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Jonathan Aylott

Associate Professor in Analytical Bioscience, Faculty of Science

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Biography

I gained my degree and PhD from the University of East Anglia. I then undertook a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Raoul Kopelman's laboratory at the University of Michigan. In 2000, I returned to the UK to take up a Lectureship in Analytical Science at the Department of Chemistry, University of Hull. In 2004 I was appointed Lecturer in Analytical Bioscience in the School of Pharmacy at Nottingham.

Research Summary

My research interests focus on the design, development and implementation of miniaturized analytical devices. Such devices can then be applied to measuring biological samples in-situ and in… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

My research interests focus on the design, development and implementation of miniaturized analytical devices. Such devices can then be applied to measuring biological samples in-situ and in real-time, generating a better understanding of disease states. Optical nanosensors are the primary focus of this research and utilise the sensitivity of fluorescence to make quantitative measurements inside living cells. The nanosensor devices are typically 50 nm in diameter and small enough to be inserted into living cells with a minimum of physical perturbation. Nanosensors enable real-time changes in small molecule concentrations in single cells to be made. They exhibit advantages over widely used fluorescence dye based methods because the nanosensor matrix imparts two key benefits: 1. Protection of the sensing component from interfering species within the intracellular environment 2. Protection of the intracellular environment from any toxic effects of the sensing component. Nanosensors capable of measuring glucose, oxygen, calcium, zinc and pH have been prepared and work is ongoing to widen the range of analytes that can be detected using this technology. An additional attractive feature of nanosensors is that they can be imaged and quantified using standard technologies, e.g., confocal microscopy, utilised in life science research. Further areas of research include developing strategies for introducing nanosensors to cells, the goal being a generic 'soft' chemical method with which to routinely deliver nanosensors to large numbers of living cells in a controllable manner. And to develop optical methods capable of resolving individual nanosensors, thereby overcoming Abbe's diffraction limit, and offering the possibility of an optical nanoscope.

Memberships of Committees and Professional Bodies

• Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry• Member of Materials Research Society• Member, EPSRC Peer Review College

School of Pharmacy

University of Nottingham
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Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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