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Tusharika Deka

Doctoral Researcher, Faculty of Social Sciences

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Biography

Tusharika is a Doctoral Researcher in the School of Politics and International Relations at the University of Nottingham where she is affiliated to Institute of Asia and Pacific Studies (IAPS). She is the recipient of the Vice - Chancellor' Scholarship for Research Excellence (International) award from the University of Nottingham to pursue her Ph.D. Prior to starting her Ph.D. at the School of Politics and International Relations, Tusharika has completed her MSc in International Relations from the University of Aberdeen and was the recipient of the Commonwealth Shared Scholarship funded by Department for International Development (DFID) and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and the Scottish Government for the year 2016-17. Previously she has done her Bachelors (Honours) in Political Science from Indraprastha College For Women, University of Delhi. Her research project investigates the ongoing Kashmir Conflict from an internal perspective and the question of citizenship of Kashmiris in Contemporary India.

Expertise Summary

National and Ethnic Conflict-Regulation, Religion and Politics, South Asian Politics, Critical Terrorism Studies, Securitization, Constructivism

Supervisors

Adeney, Katharine

Mumford, Andrew

Research Summary

Tusharika' research mainly explores the reasons behind political discontent and resort to violence in the state of India-administered Kashmir. Disgruntled groups in their own capacity have tilted… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Tusharika' research mainly explores the reasons behind political discontent and resort to violence in the state of India-administered Kashmir. Disgruntled groups in their own capacity have tilted towards violence breeding to the creation of various self-reinforcing trajectories which has led to never-ending conflict in the Kashmir Valley. Previously it was assumed that the Kashmir conflict was largely externally driven (from Pakistan), but it has now become more localized and indigenized: incorporating diverse segments of the Kashmiri youth (unemployed, working class, and the educated elite. The research aims to navigate the competing framework of Kashmiri citizenship in a conflict-driven society

Supervisors

Adeney, Katharine

Mumford, Andrew

School of Politics and International Relations

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