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Radu Muschevici

Assistant Professor,

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Biography

Radu joined UNM's School of Computer Science in October 2019. Previously he was a post-doctoral researcher in Software Engineering at Technical University Darmstadt, Germany. Radu obtained his Ph.D. in Computer Science in 2013 in the DistriNet Research Group at KU Leuven, Belgium. His PhD research focused on novel modelling language features for supporting software variability, software product lines, feature models and dynamic software updating. Radu obtained his M.Sc. in Computer Science from Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand in 2009 and his B.Sc. from Hochschule München, Germany in 2006. He has worked as a software engineer in industry for several years.

Expertise Summary

My core research interest is in designing language concepts for programming, specification and modelling that aim at making the software developing process more efficient and the resulting software safe and trustworthy.

Applications of my research include development of advanced software engineering tools such as compilers and program analysers. These are used as part of the software development life cycle, but also in other engineering disciplines where simulation and analysis of complex behaviour is of paramount importance, such as railway operations and synthetic biology.

I am further invested in building international cooperation in higher education, e.g. through research and teaching exchanges and the development of joint degree programs.

Teaching Summary

In the current academic year (2020-2021) I will teach:

  • Software Quality Assurance (3rd year), Fall semester
  • Compilers (3rd year), Fall Semester, jointly with Dr. Tomas Maul
  • Software Engineering (1st year), Spring semester

In the previous academic year (2019-2020) I taught Software Engineering, a fist year introductory course, and Software Engineering Management, a postgraduate module.

Research Summary

Final Year Project (academic year 2021-2022) topics

If you already have a well-thought-out project idea in mind, I would be happy to discuss a potential supervision with you. I am interested in topics in the following areas:

  • Software Engineering
  • Programming Languages
  • Software Modelling and Simulation
  • Computational Biology
  • Applications of Machine Learning to above topics

I am looking for topics in these areas that have a research component and novelty factor. The outcome should have scientific value and should be potentially publishable. Conversely, I am not interested to supervise topics that are purely about developing a software prototype (web app, mobile app, etc.) that replicates or repackages already existing ideas.

Furthermore, I have three FYP topics for which I am looking for motivated students to work under my supervision:

FYP project ideas for 2021-2022 Copyright: Radu Muschevici, Radu.Muschevici@nottingham.edu.my Note: If you are a final year student interested and motivated to work on any of the following topics, please get in touch with me by email (see above) so that we can schedule a meeting/discussion. I am trying to recruit students who are genuinely interested in these topics and motivated to excel in these projects. Topic 1: A Compiler for a Variability Modeling Language (VML) The goal of the project is to design and implement a compiler for a small programming (modelling) language that can express large-scale variability in software (and other domains). Such languages already exist; some examples include: the textual variability language TVL (projects.info.unamur.be/tvl), or Clafer (clafer.org). However, these all have certain limitations, which led to an initiative to design a new and improved language for modelling variability. The new language itself, which we shall call VML here (although this is just a placeholder name for now), is currently being designed and specified, with a complete specification expected to be made available in September 2021. VMLs are a relatively simple concept: they are able to express "feature models". Feature models consist of features and the relationships (constraints) among these features (an example constraint could be: If feature A is present, then feature B or C needs to be present as well, but not B and C together). Feature models define the valid set of feature combinations (e.g. {A, B}). Such sets can become quite large, even when dealing with a relatively small number of features, therefore is is important to have tools that can analyse and manipulate feature models efficiently. The FY student's initial task is to evaluate platforms for language and compiler implementation (such as LLVM) and choose a suitable one for the project. This will be done in close consultation with the project supervisor. Once the platform is chosen, the main task is to implement the compiler. The compiler will translate VML to constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs) that can be analysed using existing CSP tools such as ChocoSolver (choco-solver.org). It is expected that the student taking up this project is interested in language design and compiler construction, and is motivated to collaborate with the small team of researchers working on the VML project. The overall goal is to publish a paper at an international peer-reviewed workshop or conference. The compiler will be an important contribution towards this objective, as it will allow us to demonstrate the language's usability and performance. Topic 2: A lightweight, Text-based, Offline Publishing Platform Numerous publishing platforms for the World-Wide Web exist. These allow anyone to publish what is often called a "blog" (a web log), where they express thoughts and ideas, and make these easily accessible to the world. Most of these publishing platforms require a web browser and the user has to learn how to use a specific website/web app (e.g. WordPress, Medium, etc). The main idea of this project is to create a platform that uses git (a distributed revision control system, RCS) to publish articles. The workflow we envisage is as follows: Users write their articles on their own personal computer using a text editor in a simple markdown language. The markdown language should support hyperlinks, as well as embedding images, videos and perhaps other documents (e.g. PDF). Once finished, the text file(s) containing the article(s) (as well as associated files, such as images) are "committed" to the git repository. Lastly, they are pushed to an online remote git repository such as Github and thus published. This workflow has several advantages over sites such as WordPress: A text editor can be found on any device and does not require many computing resources. Writing articles does not require using an unfamiliar website; in fact it does not require an internet connection at all. Only pushing to the remote repository requires a short connection to the internet. Articles can be edited and refined as often as necessary. An article is published only once the author is happy with the content. The git RCS automatically keeps track of the article's creation history. One can work on several articles in parallel and publish each of these whenever satisfied with the result. The FY student's initial task is to survey the web for any tools that go in a similar direction to the workflow described above, and evaluate these. Based on the outcome, the student will then complete the requirements specification outlined above, and design a system along the given specification, in close consultation with the supervisor. The end-goal is to implement and have a working, easy to use system that can be made available for free to anyone. The student pursuing this project would be ideally already familiar with the notion of distributed revision control and specifically with git, and possibly Github or Gitlab. An interest or experience with publishing on the web would be also an advantage.

Topic 3: A database and web software for genomic data The project entails the development of a publicly available knowledge database for human enhancers. Enhancers are functional genomic elements that play an important role in controlling the expression of genes. In this project, we will be extracting experimental data for accessible chromatin regions (ACRs). The human chromosomes are generally tightly packed into an array of nucleosomes. Each nucleosome consist of a histone octamer core wrapped by 147 base pairs of DNA and separated by linker DNA. This sort of packaging of the DNA into a condensed ball allows the 3 billion base pairs of human DNA to fit snuggly into the nucleus of a cell. However, the condensed DNA of the nucleosomes also acts to regulate gene expression by making it difficult for transcription factors to bind to the DNA strand to initiate gene transcription. Conversely, nucleosome perturbation and destabilisation will lead to an open chromatin conformation that is conducive for gene transcription and expression. Thus, accessible chromatin regions are generally considered to be regions of the genome that contain promoters or enhancers that allow the binding of specific regulatory factors responsible for transcriptional activation. The goal of this project is to collate and curate information on human enhancers into a user-friendly resource for biologists. This is a biological topic but the work that needs to be done is in the area of Software Engineering. It includes curating and analysing genomic data and designing and implementing a database as well as a web interface.

Recent Publications

  • A. C. ACHDA, A. AZURAT, R. MUSCHEVICI and M. R. A. SETYAUTAMI, 2017. Extending the automated feature model analysis capability of the abstract behavioral specification In: icacsis. 453-458
  • FERRUCCIO DAMIANI, MICHAEL LIENHARDT, RADU MUSCHEVICI and INA SCHAEFER, 2017. An Extension of the ABS Toolchain with a Mechanism for Type Checking SPLs In: ifm. 111-126
  • NAILY, MOH. AFIFUN, SETYAUTAMI, MAYA RETNO AYU, MUSCHEVICI, RADU and AZURAT, ADE, 2017. A Framework for Modelling Variable Microservices as Software Product Lines In: sefm. 246-261
  • HÄHNLE, REINER and MUSCHEVICI, RADU, 2016. Towards Incremental Validation of Railway Systems In: isola. 433-446
  • A. C. ACHDA, A. AZURAT, R. MUSCHEVICI and M. R. A. SETYAUTAMI, 2017. Extending the automated feature model analysis capability of the abstract behavioral specification In: icacsis. 453-458
  • FERRUCCIO DAMIANI, MICHAEL LIENHARDT, RADU MUSCHEVICI and INA SCHAEFER, 2017. An Extension of the ABS Toolchain with a Mechanism for Type Checking SPLs In: ifm. 111-126
  • NAILY, MOH. AFIFUN, SETYAUTAMI, MAYA RETNO AYU, MUSCHEVICI, RADU and AZURAT, ADE, 2017. A Framework for Modelling Variable Microservices as Software Product Lines In: sefm. 246-261
  • HÄHNLE, REINER and MUSCHEVICI, RADU, 2016. Towards Incremental Validation of Railway Systems In: isola. 433-446
  • MAYA R. A. SETYAUTAMI, ADE AZURAT, REINER HÄHNLE and RADU MUSCHEVICI, 2016. A UML Profile for Delta-Oriented Programming to Support Software Product Line Engineering In: splc.
  • MAYA R. A. SETYAUTAMI, REINER HÄHNLE, RADU MUSCHEVICI and ADE AZURAT, 2016. A UML Profile for Delta-Oriented Programming to Support Software Product Line Engineering
  • TRIANDO, RADU MUSCHEVICI and ADE AZURAT, 2016. Incremental Product Configuration in Software Product Line Engineering In: icacsis.
  • RADU MUSCHEVICI, 2015. Dynamic, Auto-adaptive Software Product Lines using the ABS Language In: icacsis. 1-6
  • MUSCHEVICI, RADU, PROENC CA, JOSÉ and CLARKE, DAVE, 2015. Feature Nets, Behavioural modelling of software product lines sosym. Special Issue on Integrated Formal Methods, 1-26
  • MUSCHEVICI, RADU, CLARKE, DAVE and PROENCCA, JOS'E, 2013. Executable Modelling of Dynamic Software Product Lines in the ABS Language In: fosd. 17-24
  • MADS DAM, ANDREAS LUNDBLAD, RADU MUSCHEVICI, KARL PALMSKOG and THIAGO HENRIQUE BURGOS DE OLIVEIRA, 2013. Autonomous Evolving Systems
  • MADS DAM, EINAR BROCH JOHNSEN, MICHIEL HELVENSTEIJN, RADU MUSCHEVICI, RUDOLF SCHLATTE and LIZETH TAPIA, 2013. Evolvability Final Report
  • REINER HÄHNLE, ELVIRA ALBERT, EINAR BROCH JOHNSEN and RADU MUSCHEVICI, 2013. Abstract Behavioral Modelling of Variant-Rich, Concurrent Software Systems
  • RADU MUSCHEVICI, 2013. Modelling Diversity in Software Product Lines
  • WONG, PETER Y.H., ALBERT, ELVIRA, MUSCHEVICI, RADU, PROENC CA, JOSÉ, SCHÄFER, JAN and SCHLATTE, RUDOLF, 2012. The ABS tool suite: modelling, executing and analysing distributed adaptable object-oriented systems sttt. 14, 567-588
  • MICHIEL HELVENSTEIJN, RADU MUSCHEVICI and PETER Y. H. WONG, 2012. Delta modeling in practice: a Fredhopper case study In: vamos. 139-148

School of Computer Science

University of Nottingham
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