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Sebastien Serres

Assistant Professor in Metabolic Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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  • workRoom D47 School of Life Sciences, The Medical School, Queen’s Medical Centre
    Queen's Medical Centre
    Nottingham
    NG7 2UH
    UK
  • work01158230394

Biography

My research is interdisciplinary and translational, combining magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy methods, immunohistochemistry and molecular biology. During my work at Oxford, I used these approaches to investigate cellular metabolism, vascular function and inflammatory processes in animal models.

Expertise Summary

- Cell culture and experimental models of neurological disease in rodents (intracerebral, ultrasound-guided intracardiac, intraperitoneal and subcutaneous injections).

- Perfusion, fixation and extractions of cells/tissues for histology, ELISA and biochemical assays, respectively.

- Tissue sectioning and staining (immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence).

- Electrophysiology, EEG recording, laser speckle contrast imaging.

- Determination of structural and functional changes in vivo and ex vivo using MRI (T1 and T2, diffusion, magnetisation transfer and perfusion weighted MRI, functional and molecular MRI).

- Cellular metabolism measurement in vivo and ex vivo using MRS (1H, 13C and 31P).

- Image analysis, MRI/MRS data processing and metabolic modelling.

- Human physiological studies using clinical MR scanner and SpinLab hyperpolarizer.

Research Summary

In collaboration with the Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre, our group is currently involved in the development of a cutting-edge metabolic imaging method- called Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation 13C MR… read more

Recent Publications

  • MASIERO, MASSIMO, LI, DEMIN, WHITEMAN, PAT, BENTLEY, CAROL, GREIG, JENNY, HASSANALI, TASNEEM, WATTS, SARAH, STRIBBLING, STEPHEN, YATES, JENNA, BEALING, ELLEN, LI, JI-LIANG, CHILLAKURI, CHANDRAMOULI, SHEPPARD, DEVON, SERRES, SEBASTIEN, SARMIENTO-SOTO, MANUEL, LARKIN, JAMES, SIBSON, NICOLA R, HANDFORD, PENNY A, HARRIS, ADRIAN L and BANHAM, ALISON H, 2019. Development of therapeutic anti-JAGGED1 antibodies for cancer therapy. Molecular cancer therapeutics.
  • MILLER, JACK J., GRIST, JAMES T., SERRES, SEBASTIEN, LARKIN, JAMES R., LAU, ANGUS Z., RAY, KEVIN, FISHER, KATHERINE R., HANSEN, ESBEN, TOUGAARD, RASMUS STILLING, NIELSEN, PER MOSE, LINDHARDT, JAKOB, LAUSTSEN, CHRISTOFFER, GALLAGHER, FERDIA A., TYLER, DAMIAN J. and SIBSON, NICOLA, 2018. C-13 Pyruvate Transport Across the Blood-Brain Barrier in Preclinical Hyperpolarised MRI SCIENTIFIC REPORTS. 8,
  • PEREZ-BALDERAS, F., VAN KASTEREN, S. I., ALJABALI, A. A., WALS, K., SERRES, S., JEFFERSON, A., SARMIENTO SOTO, M., KHRAPITCHEV, A. A., LARKIN, J. R., BRISTOW, C., LEE, S. S., BORT, G., DE SIMONE, F., CAMPBELL, S. J., CHOUDHURY, R. P., ANTHONY, D. C., SIBSON, N. R. and DAVIS, B. G., 2017. Covalent assembly of nanoparticles as a peptidase-degradable platform for molecular MRI: Nat Commun Nat Commun. 8, 14254
  • RADUCU, M., FUNG, E., SERRES, S., INFANTE, P., BARBERIS, A., FISCHER, R., BRISTOW, C., THEZENAS, M. L., FINTA, C., CHRISTIANSON, J. C., BUFFA, F. M., KESSLER, B. M., SIBSON, N. R., DI MARCOTULLIO, L., TOFTGARD, R. and D'ANGIOLELLA, V., 2016. SCF (Fbxl17) ubiquitylation of Sufu regulates Hedgehog signaling and medulloblastoma development: EMBO J EMBO J.

Current Research

In collaboration with the Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre, our group is currently involved in the development of a cutting-edge metabolic imaging method- called Dynamic Nuclear Polarisation 13C MR spectroscopy- to investigate metabolic changes associated with brain and musculoskeletal function in health and disease. This approach could revolutionise our understanding of age-related diseases and also provide platform for diagnosis and treatment of disease in the clinic.

Interests:

In brain research:

- How disease-related changes of perivascular cell metabolism (e.g. astrocyte, pericyte and smooth muscle cell) could alter vascular function, and thus normal functioning of the brain.

- How real-time monitoring of metabolic changes could help to optimise and/or develop novel treatment strategies that aim to improve vascular function (e.g. metabolic drug, diet or exercise).

In musculoskeletal research:

- How alteration of cellular energy regeneration during exercise could affect muscular pain and fatigue, and thus quality of life.

- How real-time metabolic monitoring could help to develop and/or guide therapies targeting the effect of peripheral vascular disease on musculoskeletal function.

School of Life Sciences

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Queen's Medical Centre
Nottingham NG7 2UH

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