School of Pharmacy
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Yan Pan

Associate Professor,

Contact

  • workRoom B1B26a Block B
    Malaysia Campus
    Jalan Broga
    43500 Semenyih
    Selangor Darul Ehsan
    Malaysia
  • work+6 (03) 8725 3444

Biography

1999-2004, Bachelor of Lab Science and technology, Shanghai Second Medical University, Shanghai China

2005-2009, Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmacology, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

2006, Certificate in Good Clinical Practice, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

2016, Fellow of The Higher Education Academy

Teaching Summary

Module convener: Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics; Concepts of Pharmacogenetics

Co-teaching: Human Physiology; Asthma, Allergy and Immune disease; Molecular Pharmacology; Core skills in BMS; Structure Function and Analysis of Protein; Renal and Endocrine Diseases

Tutoring & Supervising: Final Year Projects, postgraduate research studies

Research Summary

Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are a superfamily of mono-oxygenases responsible for metabolising a wide spectrum of xenobiotics including drugs as well as endogenous compounds such as fatty acids.… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are a superfamily of mono-oxygenases responsible for metabolising a wide spectrum of xenobiotics including drugs as well as endogenous compounds such as fatty acids. Accumulation of drugs or toxins in human body may result in serious adverse toxic effects. The hydrophilicity of the metabolite is usually increased after being oxidised by CYP, which facilitates the elimination of foreign compounds from human body. However, the activities of CYPs can be inhibited or induced by various types of chemicals. As a result, drugs or food have potential to decrease or increase the elimination of co-administrated drugs, leading to adverse drug reactions or treatment failures.

My current research interest is to investigate the modulatory effects of commonly used traditional herbs on the activities of several most important human CYP isoforms (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) by in vitro evaluation. Moreover, CYPs exhibit polymorphisms. Lower or no activities of CYPs are expressed in the population carrying polymorphic genes. These people are not able to metabolise a certain group of drugs, and they are more prone to adverse drug reactions. Thus, I am also interested in investigating the activities of CYP variants and the mechanisms involved.

Future Research

In addition to in vitro investigation, I am keen to correlate in vitro with in vivo findings by performing clinical studies.

School of Pharmacy

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

For all enquiries please visit:
www.nottingham.ac.uk/enquiry