Hearing Sciences

New research updates and improves measures of benefit from otolaryngology interventions

 

Researchers from Hearing Sciences – Scottish Section and the Royal Hospital for Children in Glasgow have updated and improved the widely used Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) and Glasgow Children’s Benefit Inventory (GCBI) for better assessment of benefit from intervention.

The Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) and Glasgow Children’s Benefit Inventory (GCBI)were designed to be patient-reported questionnaires administered after an intervention such as surgery, without the need for any pre-treatment measurement. They have proved to be very popular, having been used in a large number of studies and translated into many languages. Both scales avoid the use of disease-specific language and are therefore suitable for use in a wide variety of disciplines.

Following analysis of large datasets, researchers from University of Nottingham Hearing Sciences – Scottish Section and the Royal Hospital for Children in Glasgow have updated the subscale scoring systems for both the GBI and the GCBI. The additional subscales generated by the shortened GBI (renamed GBI-5F) provide more information about the benefit of interventions than was previously available. The new 4 factor subscale scoring system for the GCBI can reveal much more about how specific treatments benefit certain aspects of children’s wellbeing.

Both publications include improved guidelines for how to calculate and present the results, which will be of value both to researchers and to those using the instruments for routine audit purposes.

GBI: Browning GG, Kubba H, Whitmer WM. Revised 15-item Glasgow Benefit Inventory with five factors based on analysis of a large population study of medical and surgical otorhinolaryngological interventions. Clinical Otolaryngology. September 2020. doi:10.1111/coa.13649

GCBI: Kubba H, Whitmer WM. Exploring the Factor Structure of the Glasgow Children’s Benefit Inventory: New Recommendations for Reporting Results. Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology. October 2020. doi:10.1177/0003489420965634

Posted on Thursday 29th October 2020

Hearing Sciences

Division of Clinical Neuroscience
School of Medicine
University of Nottingham
Medical School, QMC
Nottingham, NG7 2UH


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