School of Sociology and Social Policy
 

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Hannah Wilkinson

Assistant Professor of Criminology, Faculty of Social Sciences

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Biography

I joined the School of Sociology and Social Policy as an Assistant Professor of Criminology in September 2022. My research interests lie in the areas of war, state violence and social harm.

Before joining the University of Nottingham, I worked as a Lecturer in Criminology at Keele University. I also worked as a Teaching Fellow and Sessional Tutor at Keele alongside my doctoral research, which explored experiences of military to civilian transitions in the 21st century.

I have worked with third-sector organisations and charities to support ex-military people who have been imprisoned, and share research in accessible ways with local communities and practitioners. My research, teaching, and wider activism are anchored to social justice.

I am a member of the European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control; the European Society of Criminology; the British Society of Criminology; the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society, and the University of Nottingham Centre for the Study of Post-Conflict Societies.

ORCID ID: 0000-0002-9569-4775

ResearchGate Profile

Expertise Summary

My work spans several areas, including: 21st century warfare; military to civilian transitions; social harm and zemiology; identities and interactions with state institutions; British veterans' experiences of the US and UK led 'war on terror'; critical social theory, forms of capital and Bourdieusian 'field theory'; narrative and visual methods, including photo and object based research; and philosophies seeking to understand the complexity of mass violence and human suffering.

Teaching Summary

I convene the core second-year Criminology module, Contemporary Theories of Crime, Justice and Society. I also contribute to the core first year module, Punishment and Penality, and supervise… read more

Research Summary

I am currently working on publications exploring military to civilian transitions and former British soldiers' experiences of violence in the 'war on terror'. Through the concept of 'combat capital',… read more

Selected Publications

I convene the core second-year Criminology module, Contemporary Theories of Crime, Justice and Society. I also contribute to the core first year module, Punishment and Penality, and supervise undergraduate research on the third year Dissertation module.

I previously contributed to the following modules at Keele University:

Undergraduate

State Crimes and Crimes against Humanity - module author & convenor

Dissertation - supervisor

Crime and Justice in a Global Context

Research Methods in Criminology

Mental Health and Offending

Understanding Crime

Criminal Justice: Process, Policy and Practice

Psychology and Crime

Introduction to Criminology - module author & convener

Postgraduate

Contemporary Criminology: Theory and Practice (MA, Level 7);

Researching Crime and Criminal Justice (MA);

Advanced Topics in Criminology and Criminal Justice (MA);

Dissertation (MA, Supervisor)

Other:

In 2017 I was invited to contribute to the second year Sociology module, Deconstructing Gender at Manchester Metropolitan University - with a session based on my research with military veterans: 'War, what is it good for? Deconstructing Masculinity'.

I co-supervised Dr. Emma Thacker's interdisciplinary professional doctorate, with thesis title: Contract Cheating and Academic Literacies: Exploring the landscape (viva passed June, 2022). I have also been an external MRes supervisor at Birkbeck University of London.

In terms of supervising doctoral research, I am interested in projects exploring broader areas of harm, including but not limited to:

War; border violence; authoritarianism; the climate emergency; local and global conflict; abolition and transformative justice; social exclusion entangled with 'race', class and gender; and the illegalisation of protest.

Please get in touch if you would like to discuss a potential PhD project.

Current Research

I am currently working on publications exploring military to civilian transitions and former British soldiers' experiences of violence in the 'war on terror'. Through the concept of 'combat capital', my research seeks to understand the complex embodied traces and symbolic 'value' of war. I am in the process of writing my doctoral thesis into a book, with working title: War and Social Harm.

I am also researching harms flowing from the UK government's response to COVID-19.

Past Research

I have evaluated third-sector housing projects designed for veterans leaving imprisonment, and have worked with charities to support ex-military communities and their families across Birmingham, Stoke and the Midlands.

In 2017 I worked as a Research Assistant with Dr Samantha Weston to evaluate the Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) prevention programme delivered by Staffordshire Police. I also worked with Sam in 2016 to evaluate early intervention and community-based prevention of solvent (ab)use in the UK, provided by the charity Re-Solv.

Alongside academic colleagues, artists, policy makers and advocates with veteran communities, I worked on the multi-disciplinary project 'Reimagine the Veteran' led by Dr Emma Murray, Liverpool John Moores University. The 2016 project included making a short video about my PhD research and theoretical concept of 'combat capital'.

My PhD research explored the experiences of former military personnel leaving the armed forces and areas of conflict in the 21st century. The project used photos, objects, and narrative story telling methods to understand the embodied impact of delivering violence on behalf of the British military in the 'war on terror'. The research also offers rich insights into military to civilian transitions and experiences of (re)shaping identities after institutionalisation.

I recently published findings around the harms of criminalisation for military veterans, including the complex 'dance of disclosure' faced by ex-armed forces communities navigating life with a criminal record amid a time of violent austerity.

School of Sociology and Social Policy

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University of Nottingham
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