School of Sociology and Social Policy
   
   
  
 

Jill Pascall

Emeritus Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences

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Biography

Professor Jill Pascall became an Emeritus Professor following her retirement from the school in 2008.

Relationships between welfare states and gender have been at the centre of Professor Pascalls's research and publication, since Social Policy: A Feminist Analysis in 1986. More recently, research with Professor Anna Kwak at the University of Warsaw on Gender Regimes in Transition studied gender and parenting in the changing social policy environment after communism (Policy Press 2005). Innovative Policies for Gender Equality at Work (2006) supported by the European Social Fund, drew comparative social policy into a national context, exploring the relevance of a range of European policies to lower paid workers in England. Gender Equality in the Welfare State? (Policy Press 2012) analysed the male breadwinner model in terms of power, employment, care, income and time. Gender and Welfare States in East Asia: Confucianism or Gender Equality? (Palgrave Macmillan 2014) is co-edited with Sirin Sung, Queens' University Belfast.

Professor Pascall considers enabling disability research involving disabled researchers particularly important. Disability and Transition to Adulthood (Hendey and Pascall, Pavilion 2001) funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, asked what enabled young disabled people to achieve independent living and employment. The European Social Fund supported two related projects with disabled researchers, asking about young disabled people. First was research with Gillian Parker, Nicola Hendey et al, Double Discrimination? Gender and Disability in Access to the Labour Market, published by the Social Policy Research Unit, University of York (2008). Second was Future Selves: Career Choices of Young Disabled People (2006) with Sonali Shah and Robert Walker. As Young Disabled People: Choices, Aspirations, Constraints (Ashgate 2008) it was published by Sonali Shah, now a research fellow at the University of Glasgow.

As Professor Emeritus in Social Policy, Professor Pascall has particularly enjoyed supervising research students, mainly in gender, health, disability and social policy. Past and present PhD students have researched gender in the welfare regimes of Germany, Jordan, Malta and Korea; lone motherhood in Taiwan; lone fatherhood; teenage parenting; aspects of health and health policy in the UK, Thailand and Turkey; reproduction and reproductive policy in the UK, Nigeria and Cameroon; Ghana's street children and Cyprus' voluntary sector. Never-too-late Julia Allison started a PhD on midwifery, published as Delivered at Home in 1996. Too busy then, enhancing midwives' work through their Royal College, to complete her Nottingham PhD, she was awarded two doctorates in 2013, at 74: a PhD for new research submitted to Manchester, and an honorary doctorate recognising her contribution to midwifery, here at Nottingham.

  • Sirin Sung and Gillian Pascall, eds. (2014). Gender and Welfare States in East Asia: Confucianism or Gender Equality? Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Gillian Pascall and Nicola Hendey (2014). Disability and Transition to Adulthood. Pavilion Publishing and Media.
  • Gillian Pascall (2012). Gender equality in the welfare state? Policy Press.
  • Gillian Pascall and Anna Kwak. Gender regimes in transition in Central and Eastern Europe. Policy Press.
  • Gillian Parker, Cornelius Grebe, Michael Hirst, Nicola Hendey and Gillian Pascall (2008). Double Discrimination? Gender and Disability in Access to the Labour Market. Social Policy Research Unit, University of York.
  • Elizabeth Fox, Gillian Pascall, and Tracey Warren (2006). Innovative Social Policies for Gender Equality at Work: research findings. School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Nottingham.
  • Sonali Shah, Gillian Pascall and Robert Walker (2006). Future Selves: Career choices of young disabled people. School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Nottingham.
  • Gillian Pascall (1996). Social Policy: A New Feminist Analysis. Routledge.

School of Sociology and Social Policy

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University of Nottingham
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Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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