Triangle

Course overview

Start your journey to become a doctor, learning from world-leading researchers and clinicians to achieve your goals.

The course is split into two parts:

  • the early years, where students learn the skills and knowledge required to become a doctor and complete a research project leading to a BMedSci
  • the later years, called the Clinical Phase, where students put their learning into practice on placements at hospitals and GP surgeries

You'll be taught by experienced teachers in a medical school with 50 years' experience training doctors and an excellent reputation for teaching and research. You'll be able to explore a broad range of research areas as part of your studies alongside national and international leaders in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cancer research, mental health technology and more.

Medical students at Nottingham join a great student community, with a student-led society that is always putting on events throughout the year and provides support in the form of peer mentoring and more.

At Nottingham you'll get the clinical skills you need for a successful career in medicine and still have time to enjoy your university experience.

What's the difference between the medicine courses?

We often get asked what the main differences are between our different medicine courses, so we've developed a guide to help you compare them.

View the differences between our medicine courses

Advice on applying to medicine

Medical Schools Council advice on applying to study Medicine

Medical School admissions updates from the Medical School Council during the Covid-19 pandemic

UCAS

All applications must be made in UCAS by 15 October.

If you wish to make a change from another medicine course to a University of Nottingham medicine course on UCAS within 14 days of submitting your choices, please ensure the change is made before 15 October or your application will be unsuccessful.

Fee status

It’s important that we understand which fees you will be charged if you managed to secure a place, as this influences our selection process due to the number of places available for home and international students. Sometimes it is not possible for us to accurately determine your fee status from the information submitted on your UCAS application.

If we cannot accurately determine your fee status, we will ask you to complete a Fee Status Questionnaire which will be sent by email. You must then complete this questionnaire by 30 November otherwise your application will be withdrawn.

Application Timeline

If you meet our entry requirements, you may be invited for the interview stage. This usually takes place between December and February.

We usually issue offers in February and March.

DBS and Occupational Health checks are usually sent out to offer holders around May or June in the year of entry.

Access and support

We believe that everyone should have the opportunity to study medicine and we actively welcome all students including those who have a disability or ongoing health issue. We also welcome applications from care leavers, refugees, and those from areas where people are less likely to go to university.

We want to offer you the support you need from the time of your application through to the completion of your studies. The support we can offer is optional and individual to you. Please be assured that any information you provide will be treated with strict confidentiality and sensitivity. We’re aware that you may wish to leave some of the labels like ‘care’ behind, but it is important for us to know them so we can help you achieve your goals.

To provide you with the best support throughout the admissions process, it is essential that you tick the relevant boxes to notify us on your UCAS application like the disability declaration or the ‘in-care’ box if you have been in care for 3 months or more.

We are fully committed to welcoming those from all walks of life into studying medicine and would encourage you to contact us at the earliest opportunity.

Any declarations will not negatively impact on the selection process, but will help us understand how to best support you. If you know of any reason which may affect your ability to study medicine, please seek advice from us before applying.

You must be 17 or older on 1 September of the year you will begin your course to be considered.

Please be aware that we have a responsibility to ensure all students will be eligible for registration by the General Medical Council on graduation and this will influence who we are able to offer places to.

Find out more about the available School of Medicine support

Medicine at Lincoln

You can also apply for this course at Lincoln Medical School. If you apply for both, you will only need to be interviewed once. It is possible to get offers from both, or one or the other.

Clearing

Due to the popularity of this course, we do not usually go into Clearing.

Previous medicine applicants

Previous unsuccessful applicants for any of our medicine courses can re-apply and will be considered against other current applicants. However, you can only be interviewed over a maximum of two occasions, or must wait a minimum of three years after your second interview before applying again. Any previous applicants who caused significant reservations during the selection process will be rejected.

We do not accept applications from those who have previously been studying on a medicine course at this, or another medical school. We also don't allow students to transfer onto our medical courses.

Deferred Entry

We will accept deferred applications, however, in order to be fair to the next years' applicants, we only make a limited number of deferred offers.

If you don't apply for deferred entry initially, but decide to defer after receiving an offer, you must make your request by 1 May. Any requests received after the deadline will only be considered in exceptional circumstances.

Due to the limited number of places on the course, we also reserve the right to refuse deferral requests if the situation requires it (for example, if we have an exceptionally high number of deferred offer holders one year).

Intercalating

We do not offer intercalating as part of this course (where a student takes a year out of their medical studies to complete a second degree) as the BMedSci is integrated into the course structure. As a result, all students will complete a BMedSci degree as part of their course here.

However students do have an option to suspend their studies after their BMedSci to take a Masters or PhD degree before completing their BMBS.

Why choose this course?

Extra BMedSci degree

Complete a Bachelor of Medical Sciences (BMedSci) degree in your third year. You'll undertake a supervised research project in an area you find interesting without needing to study for an extra year.

Full-body dissection

Learn anatomy using full-body dissection.

Case-based learning

A case-based learning course which makes use of real patient scenarios and focuses you on their key clinical points

Work with patients

through regular visits to GPs from as early as your first term in your first year and hospitals in your final years.

Placements

Experience placements across a range of NHS trusts and general practices in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire


Entry requirements

All candidates are considered on an individual basis and we accept a broad range of qualifications. The entrance requirements below apply to 2022 entry.

UK entry requirements
A level AAA
IB score IB 36 (6, 6, 6 at Higher Level including biology and chemistry, excluding core component) with GCSEs stated (or equivalent)

Offer requirements

A level offer

We do not use predicted A level grades and do not score A levels, AS levels, or equivalent as part of our selection process. However, any offers made will be conditional on meeting the A level requirements.

AAA: must include biology (or human biology) and chemistry.

A pass is normally required in science practical tests, where these are assessed separately. However, due to the pandemic and the uncertainty of practical tests taking place, this will not required for 2022 applicants.

We will not accept citizenship studies, critical thinking, general studies, or global perspectives as your third A.

You must study three A levels for two years and meet the entry requirements, however you can take an extra A level a year earlier or later if needed to meet the entry requirements or recommended by your school or college.

Please note we do not usually accept A levels which have taken three years to complete.

We will consider resits for no more than two A levels as long as:

  • you have completed your A levels in the last 12 months
  • you have already obtained at least ABB with at least one A in biology/human biology or chemistry
  • you must achieve AAA after taking your resits

Degree offer

You are also able to apply for this course if you already have a degree.

You will need a 2:1 degree in any subject plus the A level requirements and a minimum of GCSE level 4 (C) in maths and English language

You may also consider applying for our Graduate Entry Medicine course as this is specifically aimed at graduates of other disciplines.

Candidates may apply for medicine during any year of their existing degree studies – you do not need to withdraw. You may continue with your studies while awaiting your new Medicine application outcome. Any exams taken while on the degree will not be taken into consideration. A-levels and GCSE’s must therefore meet the requirements as outlined in our standard requirements.

Where a candidate is reliant on their degree for academic entry purposes, they may apply for our course through UCAS at the beginning of their final year with their degree or integrated masters result pending. In these cases, offers to study Medicine will be conditional on candidates achieving the necessary academic requirements. The degree must be an honours degree and the award must be conferred to us by providing a final transcript no later than 20 July each year.

Degrees must have been completed in the natural length intended for your qualification - for example 3 years for a bachelors (like a BSc) or 4 years for an undergraduate masters (like an MSci).

If you are applying with an undergraduate (bachelors or undergraduate masters) degree, you may not need to meet the standard A level requirements. We will review this if you have achieved or are predicted to achieve a first class honours degree at undergraduate level in a relevant subject with enough biology and chemistry content. You will still, however, need to have achieved as least a 4 (C) in GCSE in both maths and English language. Any offers made without the A level requirements are conditional on you achieving a first in your primary degree before starting the course.

For more information on which degrees are relevant, please contact the Student Recruitment Support Hub.

Accelerated degrees resulting in the award of a BSc Hons (completed over two years rather than three) may be accepted in lieu of A levels where a 1st class has been achieved. We will review these applications on a case-by-case basis. GCSE maths and English language must still be achieved at a minimum of C grade. For information on whether your degree is accepted please contact the Student Recruitment Support Hub.

IB offer

36 (6, 6, 6 at Higher Level including biology and chemistry, excluding core component) with the GCSE requirements (or equivalent)

We will accept either of the maths qualifications for the IB at standard level (SL) or higher level (HL).

We do not score the IB and we do not require predicted IB grades as part of our selection process. However, you will still need to achieve the IB grades required to meet your offer.

We will consider resits of a maximum of 2 subjects as long as:

  • You have completed your IB in the last 12 months
  • You have achieved 34 total points overall
  • You have obtained 6,5,5 at Higher Level with a 6 in chemistry or biology – the other one being at level 5.
  • Students must be predicted and achieve 666 (including biology and chemistry)

Contextual offers

A levels - AAB with at least one A in either biology or chemistry

IB - 35 (6,6,5 at Higher Level including 6 in either biology or chemistry, excluding core component) with the GCSE requirements (or equivalent)

This type of offer is given to students who meet our contextual admissions or elite athlete criteria.

If you are a contextual applicant and you're successful at interview, you will receive the standard A level offer. If you select us as your firm choice, your offer will then be lowered to the contextual offer of AAB or 35.

Find out more about contextual offers at University of Nottingham

Minimum entry requirements

GCSEs

If you are applying with A levels or the IB, you must meet the following GCSE requirements unless otherwise stated.

We require a minimum of 6 GCSEs at Level 7 (A).

These 6 GCSEs at Level 7 must include chemistry and biology – or double science if you have not taken the individual science subjects – and may include maths and English language.

If maths and English language are not included in your 6 GCSEs at Level 7, you will need a minimum grade of Level 6 in both subjects.

When selecting for interview, GCSE grades are scored and allocated points. We score a maximum of 8 GCSEs including the required subject grades.

If you are applying with a degree, you must have achieved at least a level 4 (C) in maths and English language.

Find out more about the selection process

We do not accept GCSE resits.

Where applicants chose to sit their GCSEs examinations for the first time in the Autumn 2020 examination series, we will not consider this as a re-sit.

We do not accept applied science, short course GCSEs or functional skills for English and maths.

GCSEs taken over multiple years may be accepted for home schooled students as long as they meet the entry requirements.

English language

If English is not your first language, you will need to have proof of your fluency with one of the following:

  • IELTS 7.5 (no less than 7.0 in any element)
  • Pearson Test of English (Academic) 79 (minimum 76)
  • Cambridge Proficiency/Advanced test (from January 2015) 191 with no element below 185

If your home country is not the UK, but you moved to the UK (with indefinite leave to remain) within two years before taking GCSE English Language or equivalent and did not achieve Level 6 then we will accept one of the alternative qualifications.

Work experience

Applicants are usually expected to complete regular work experience when applying for medicine.

This can be:

  • Volunteering in a care related setting
  • Volunteering with disadvantaged groups
  • Paid employment in a job working with the general public

As part of your application we usually ask for evidence of your work experience. This may include a description of the experience, dates for when it took place, and a reference contact.

Please note, we are not expecting any work experience to have taken place or be ongoing after March 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic. Your application for 2022 entry will not be negatively affected if you’ve been unable to complete any work experience you had planned. We will however be looking for knowledge of the profession and an understanding of the scope of the role and we may ask about this during your interview.

If possible we'd advise that you speak to someone working in the NHS to ensure you are making an informed choice about your career in medicine.

We expect you to demonstrate a commitment to caring for people and a realistic idea of what working as a doctor entails.

Any students considering a gap year should use their time constructively either by working or further preparing yourself for a future career in medicine.

Test

You must also complete the University Clinical Aptitude Test (UCAT) in the same year you are applying. We do not accept the BioMedical Admissions Test (BMAT) for entry.

Find out more about the UCAT

We do not have a fixed UCAT threshold score when selecting for interview.

We do not accept applicants who achieve Band 4 on the Situational Judgement Test on the UCAT.

Find out more about how we use the UCAT in the selection process for interviews

Interview

You will be required to have an interview. This usually takes the form of Multiple Mini Interviews (MMI). For 2022 entry, interviews may be face to face or online using Microsoft Teams. We will provide more details as they become available.

Interviews are offered to candidates based on scores as calculated by our selection process. The percentage threshold varies from year to year based on the number of applicants.

If you meet the entry requirements for the course and have completed the Nottingham Pathways to Medicine Programme, the Nottingham Potential Summer School or the Nottingham Sutton Trust Summer School, you will be considered for the interview stage without having to go through the UCAT/GCSE scoring stage of our selection process.

The fast track to interview is also available for elite athletes if the minimum entry requirements are met. In order to make sure we recognise elite athlete status, please fill in an expression of interest in UoN sport form before the UCAS deadline.

If you are eligible for the fast track to interview you will still need to sit the UCAT and achieve Band 1 to 3 on the Situational Judgement Test.

The fast track to interview is only applicable to those applying for their first degree.

Find out more about the selection process for interviews

Fitness to practise

We must be confident in your conduct, health and ability to be professional and interact safely with patients.

As part of your application you will be required to have an occupational health assessment and a disclosure and barring service (DBS) check. This usually takes place around May or June for offer holders.

We are able to accept pre-existing DBS checks as long as they meet the enhanced criteria check and are registered on the Update Service.

If we have any serious concerns we will not offer you a place, and reserve the right to revoke offers should serious concerns arise before starting the course.

Find out more about fitness to practise

Excluded students database

When offering places to students we check the MSC Excluded Students Database as part of our commitment to professionalism and fitness to practise. We may also ask if you have encountered professionalism issues with other professional bodies such as the Pharmacy Council or the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.

If either we or another medical school have terminated your studies, your details are shared with regulatory bodies and other medical schools through this database.

Offers

All offers are made subject to being successful at interview, and having an occupational health assessment, DBS clearance, and no fitness to practise issues.

If you are still studying for the required qualifications and your predicted grades meet the entry requirements, offers will be conditional on you achieving those grades.

If you have already met the offer requirements, offers will be unconditional subject to having an occupational health assessment, DBS clearance, and no fitness to practise issues.

Find out more about the undergraduate selection process.

Foundation progression options

If you meet specific criteria and don't expect to meet the grades for this course, you could apply for our Medicine with a Foundation Year course. It's the same great course, but it gives you an extra year to ensure you have the skills you need to succeed in Medicine.

Please note that you cannot apply for both this course and the Medicine with a Foundation Year course.

You cannot use other foundation courses at this university or any other medical school to transfer onto this course.

Learning and assessment

How you will learn

Teaching methods

  • Anatomy sessions
  • Clinical relevance sessions
  • Clinical skills sessions
  • Case-based learning
  • eLearning
  • Full-body dissection
  • Lab sessions
  • Lectures
  • Placements
  • Practical classes
  • Self-study
  • Seminars
  • Small group learning
  • Tutorials

How you will be assessed

Assessment methods

  • Case studies
  • Clinical exams
  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Examinations
  • Formative assessments
  • Logbooks
  • Objective structured clinical exams
  • Poster presentation
  • Practical exams
  • Presentation
  • Short project
  • Verbal exam
  • Workplace-based assessment

Contact time and study hours

During your first three years you will have approximately 16 to 18 hours of teaching contact time with around 20 hours of independent study. You'll spend around five days on placement each semester.

During your time on the Clinical Phase you will spend between 35 to 40 hours across five days every week studying and on placements. You’ll spend around two to three days on ward, clinic or GP placement visits per week with one day of independent study and one to two days of teaching contact time. This will include some time on call and some out of hours work.

Your holidays will also differ during the Clinical Phase from the standard student timetable. You will get around the same holiday you would get on a regular job for each of your final years, approximately 6 weeks. This is usually taken as two weeks at Christmas, two weeks at Easter, and two weeks during the summer.

Study abroad

During the final few years of your course, you'll usually have the opportunity to study abroad on exchanges with other medical students from across the globe. Past destinations have included Croatia, Germany, Malaysia, Norway, Slovakia, and Spain.

Students are also given a six-week elective placement at the end of their final year which they can also usually spend abroad. 

All study abroad and elective placement destinations will depend on the Covid-19 situation and will remain under consideration.

Placements

The course includes 15 main placements over the clinical phase, with each lasting up to six weeks. There are also 10 weeks of student selected modules and a six-week elective placement.

You will experience a range of settings including medical, surgical, specialty skills, mental health and community-based medicine. Placements are located within four large NHS trusts in the region, as well as with general practices.

During placements, you will be supported by experienced clinical mentors.

Placements can take place in:

  • Nottingham at the Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham City Hospital, and Highbury Hospital
  • Derby at Royal Derby Hospital
  • Mansfield at King's Mill Hospital
  • Chesterfield at Chesterfield Royal Hospital
  • GP practices across the region

Find out more about where clinical placements take place

Modules

You'll begin your degree by developing an understanding of the scientific and professional basics of medicine. You will then be taught subjects on themes based on overarching clinical problems: specifically respiratory and cardiovascular medicine, the musculoskeletal system, and cancer.

There is also the opportunity to reinforce your learning through hospital and general practice visits.

In the spring semester, students usually have the chance to study an optional module, looking into specific topics in a bit more depth.

Compulsory modules

Medicine 1: Scientific and professional basis of medicine

This module contributes to developing an understanding of the scientific and professional basis of medicine.

In particular the module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of fundamental biochemical, physiological and anatomical concepts and their relation to disease processes.

The theme-based content will include:

  • Cells
  • Biochemical Basics
  • Tissues of the Body
  • Muscle
  • Nerves
  • Pharmacology
  • Blood and Infection
  • Reproduction
  • Inflammation
  • Metabolism

Students will also be taught the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes required for the assessment and management of patients. Students will be introduced to the patient as a whole person. They will be asked to consider challenging ethical scenarios and will receive an introduction to ethical frameworks as well as considering issues such as information governance and confidentiality.

The module will provide students with some basic clinical skills and introduce them to theoretical and statistical approaches to understanding health. They also will receive training in first aid for mental health. This is delivered by lectures, popular topics, directed reading, private study, workshops, e-learning, practical classes and hospital and general practice clinical visits to both primary and secondary care.

Medicine 2: Respiratory, Cardiovascular, Cancer, and Musculoskeletal

This module provides an introduction to the basic anatomy and physiology of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems, cancer biology and the musculoskeletal system, together with fundamentals in haematology.

The module teaches physiological control mechanisms, the pathophysiology and pharmacological approaches to treating common disease states. It also aims to develop knowledge and understanding of cancer biology and the anatomy of the neck shoulder and upper limbs.

In terms of professional development and communication, health beliefs and culture and communicating with people who are distressed are taught as well as how to interpret and communicate risks and screening and diagnostic testing. Students will be introduced to the concept of randomized controlled trials.

This module is delivered by lectures, seminars, practical classes, podcasts, directed reading, private study, workshops and clinical visits.

Integrated Medicine 1

This module enables development and assessment of the student’s capacity to integrate knowledge across all body systems to assess patient and symptom presentation permitting differential diagnosis.

The module will include understanding of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology as well as clinical testing and patient communication and treatment and will build upon knowledge and skills obtained from the case studies that overarch each week.

Biomedical Skills 1

This module provides students with the background to anatomy, radiology and imaging, coupled with a basic understanding of clinical measurements (biochemical, physiological, pharmacological and numerical) that will be essential for progress in clinical medicine.

Optional

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, we made the difficult decision to not run any optional modules for Year 1 and 2 students during the 2020/21 and 21/22 academic years. As a result of continuing uncertainty we are unsure of the delivery of optional modules for Year 1 and 2 students during the 2022/23 academic year.

We do not yet know how modules may change in future years of this course, as a result of the coronavirus situation or other factors, such as developments in the curriculum. Where we have to make material changes to modules, we will update this online prospectus as soon as we can.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on Friday 08 October 2021.

Your second year continues your theme based teaching, looking into a variety of other clinical problems. In each semester you will usually be able to take an optional module which interests you most.

Compulsory

Medicine 3: Gastrointestinal medicine, endocrine physiology, reproductive systems and kidneys

This module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of fundamental biochemical, physiological, pharmacological and anatomical concepts and their relation to gastrointestinal disease processes, endocrine physiology, the reproductive system and the kidney.

The module will provide an introduction to the alimentary system, and important aspects of nutrition and metabolism.

In addition, endocrine system teaching will provide the knowledge base for management of disease. This module will include the non-reproductive endocrine system with particular attention on pituitary, adrenal, thyroid and pancreatic function. As the endocrine system is a key system involved in whole body homeostasis, principles of control and integration of metabolism will be re-visited.

The reproductive system will cover the male and female reproductive system and pregnancy with particular attention on function of the ovary and testes, endometrial, cervical epithelial and prostate gland changes, placental physiology, problems in pregnancy and hormonal control of the reproductive system.

Renal teaching will provide descriptions of the intrarenal circulation and its relation to tubular elements, the processes located to the proximal tubule, loop of Henle, distal tubule and collecting duct, and the integration of these systems in the control of extracellular fluid volume and osmolality (including hormonal mechanisms) and in acid-base balance.

Students will be continue their general practice clinical visits. They will also be taught the skills of history taking and examination for patients with abdominal/alimentary conditions and they will be taught how to clearly explain information to patients. They will also focus on patients with an endocrine condition and will be taught diversity in sexuality and how to challenge attitudes of prejudice. Students will examine eyes and ears using an otoscope and ophthalmoscope.

Students will revisit the concept of safety, considering foresight, hazard awareness and risk. Students will also be introduced to measures of disease frequency and its relevance in clinical medicine. Physical and psychological changes and health behaviours that occur during adolescence will be explored. They will also be introduced to the concepts of systems and basic quality improvement approaches in healthcare. Further epidemiological analysis and the basis of evidence-based medicine will be introduced.

Topic specific communication skills will be explored. Having previously considered why errors occur they will explore the steps and role of incident analysis in healthcare, including Duty of Candour. They will also explore the role of nontechnical skills in healthcare with a focus on teamwork, communication, decision making and situation monitoring.

Delivery will predominantly be via lectures, podcasts, workshops, anatomical dissection classes, clinical visits, e-microscope histology and directed private study.

Medicine 4: Central Nervous System

This module provides an introduction to the basic anatomy, physiology, pharmacology and psychology of the central nervous system.

The module aims to develop knowledge of these fundamental principles within the context of relevant weekly themes. The theme-based content will begin with a focus on depression and anxiety.

Students will be provided with a general introduction to the relevant brain anatomy followed by an in depth examination of the system physiology and pharmacology. The depression and anxiety theme will include individual sessions on the limbic system, emotion and mood, and treatment strategies. Ultimately, this will provide the basis for understanding theme based functions and the production of behaviours.

Subsequent weekly themes include:

  • pain (including sessions on neuropsychology of pain, the use of anaesthetics, and pain management)
  • movement disorders (including sessions on the anatomy and pharmacology of movement, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and executive function)
  • dementia (including sessions on Alzheimer’s disease, neuropsychological assessment, and memory)
  • sensory disorders (including sessions on the visual and auditory systems and epilepsy)
  • and serious mental illness (including sessions on neurotransmission, attention, language, and schizophrenia).

Content will be delivered through lectures, podcasts, and practical classes on brain dissection, clinical neurological demonstrations and plenary lectures. Furthermore, the module also continues to consider the themes of patient safety and human factors as well as continuing with their primary care visits. Students will be expected to engage in directed reading and private study.

Integrated Medicine 2

This module enables development and assessment of the student’s capacity to integrate knowledge across all body systems to assess patient and symptom presentation permitting differential diagnosis.

The module will include understanding of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology as well as clinical testing and patient communication and treatment and will build upon knowledge and skills obtained from the case studies that overarch each week.

Biomedical Skills 2

This module provides students with further background to anatomy, radiology and imaging, coupled with a basic understanding of clinical measurements (biochemical, physiological, pharmacological and numerical) that will be essential for progress in clinical medicine.

Clinical Medicine

This module contributes to further development of an understanding of the doctor as a professional. Students will be taught the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes required for the assessment and management of patients. Students will be introduced to the patient as a whole person.

They will be asked to consider challenging ethical scenarios and will be taught how to communicate sensitively and empathetically with different patients in various scenarios.

The module will provide students with some basic clinical skills (e.g. taking a patient history, assessing gastrointestinal function) and introduce them to theoretical and statistical approaches to understanding health.

This is delivered by lectures, popular topics, directed reading, private study, workshops, practical classes and hospital and general practice clinical visits to both primary and secondary care.

Optional

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we made the difficult decision to not run any optional modules for Year 1 and 2 students during the 2020/21 and 2021/22 academic years. As a result we are also unsure of the delivery of optional modules for Year 1 and 2 students during the 2022/23 academic year.

We do not yet know how modules may change in future years of this course, as a result of the coronavirus situation or other factors, such as developments in the curriculum. Where we have to make material changes to modules, we will update this online prospectus as soon as we can.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on

Your third year begins with a supervised research project in an area of your choice and an accompanying Research Methods module to help with the project. You are also able to take two optional advanced medical science modules which may or may not be related to your project. This will lead to being awarded the BMedSci.

You will spend a compulsory week in primary care developing skills to assess patients in a general practice environment and participate in a therapeutics module, that will develop your prescribing skills before you move into the clinical phases of the programme.

You'll then move into the final years and begin the Clinical Phase which will see you rotate through a series of placements at major teaching hospitals and within primary care facilities across the region.

Compulsory

Evidence Based Medicine

The aim of this module is to introduce the concept of evidence based medicine and review in depth many of the research methodologies, which underpin this. This will include ethical issues in animal and human research studies.

During the evidence based medicine course students will be building on previous learning and acquiring knowledge, skills and attitudes that link to aspects of the Outcomes for Graduate specified by the GMC. They will learn about the design of biomedical studies of various kinds, and the collection, analysis and interpretation of data, how to search for scientific information and how to critique biomedical studies and research papers. They will develop an understanding of the ethical considerations in medical research and the principles of academic integrity.
Students will attend lectures and will be required to engage in private study, including the reading of scientific research papers.

It will be essential to demonstrate appropriate professional attitudes and behaviour.

Honours Year Project

In your chosen area for your research, you’ll spend year three working on your Honours Year project in which you will carry out your project to test the hypothesis formulated in the research methods module. The form of the project can vary and may be based on laboratory work, audit, patient studies or an extended literature review with proof of critical engagement. A submission of around 10,000 words is expected as your project write-up. A range of optional modules related to Research Project are shown below. 

Therapeutics

This module will help you develop your prescribing skills and understanding of therapeutics and treating infections to prepare you for the Clinical Phase.

Primary Care Placement

You will spend a compulsory week in primary care developing skills to assess patients in a general practice environment to prepare you for the Clinical Phase.

Optional modules for year three research project

Anti-Cancer Therapies and Cardiovascular Disease

This module focuses on how cancer therapies have developed in recent years, and how the long-term cardiovascular effects of these treatments in cancer survivors should be considered.

Six lectures will cover: an introduction to cancer therapy, the role of VEGF in tumour angiogenesis, anti-VEGF cancer therapies, cardiovascular consequences of anti-cancer treatment, the role of alternative splicing and molecular targeting in cancer and future strategies for cancer therapy.

GPCR polymorphisms, disease and personalised medicine

This module aims to facilitate:

  • an understanding of the major class of receptors in man, GPCRs, and their varied roles as drug targets
  • awareness of the range of genetic polymorphisms in GPCRs and associated proteins linked with disease and drug action, backed by specific examples
  • and critical evaluation of the ability to target such polymorphic variants therapeutically to deliver future medical advances.

This will predominantly be within the home base and there is a requirement for students to carry out significant private study including reading advanced texts, review articles and research papers on specialist medical science topics.It will be essential to demonstrate appropriate professional attitudes and behaviour.

Models and Approaches in Mental Illness

The module will explore theoretical, research and clinical approaches to the understanding of theaetiology and treatment of common mental illness/disorders such as mood and anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. It will draw upon international as well as local research in these fields at the University of Nottingham.

You'll gain knowledge and understanding of the following in common mental health:

  • Models and approaches that are being used to understand how mental health problems are caused and/or maintained and how they can be treated
  • Link between brain and cognitive function and underlying psychological and/or clinical problems.Methods used in research and clinical practice to study and/or manage the psychopathology of mental illness.
Quantitative and Qualitative Methods for Mental Health Research

The module 'Quantitative and Qualitative Methods for Mental Health Research' is designed so that students can acquire the concepts, skills and knowledge required to conduct and evaluate both qualitative and quantitative research in mental health and explore concepts and principles of psychiatry and applied psychology to enhance their evidence-based practice.

Critical Thinking Skills in Epidemiology and Public Health

This module is intended to prepare students for interpreting the literature they will read as practising physicians.

This involves teaching them critical thinking skills and includes examination of three medical topics covered by the assigned papers.

These will include the following study designs:

  • case control studies
  • randomised controlled trials
  • cross-sectional population surveys
  • cohort studies

Important issues in epidemiological research such as ethics and clinical constraints, case definition, research methods, power, bias and confounding and strength of evidence will be discussed, as relevant, for each paper.

Systematic reviews and national clinical guidelines will also be studied to understand the process of how these contribute to evidence based medicine. This will provide understanding of how individual research studies are brought together, evaluated for their quality. and combined to provide the recommendations and guidance that is used by healthcare professionals in practice.

Cancer

This module provides a clinical overview of cancer including:

  • the molecular biology of cancer
  • cancer angiogenesis
  • pre-clinical modelling of cancer
  • clinical trials and adjuvant treatments in cancer
  • breast cancer: biology and treatment
  • new biological treatments for cancer.
Principles of Surgical Infection

The module includes the following topics:

  • Basic surgical microbiology revision
  • Operating theatre rituals and their scientific basis (if any)
  • Surgical aspects of various surgeries, for example: vascular graft surgery, orthopaedic surgery,neurosurgery, and gastro – intestinal surgery, with emphasis on infection prevention
  • Scientific, pathological and microbiological aspects of the above. Identification and discussion of period of risk (different in each) and logistic/patient risk factors
  • Prevention of surgical infection: identification of the problem and practical solutions. Relative contributions of hospital vs community pathogens, and of theatre vs ward sources.
  • Treatment of surgical infection: therapeutic choices and their pharmacokinetic aspects
Methods in Public Health and Epidemiology

This module builds on previously taught techniques and principles that distinguish epidemiological research from true experimental research. It also provides an introduction to commonly used planning and decision making tools in public health practice.

Students will develop an understanding of how epidemiological research principles can be applied to public health medicine. Students are also introduced to statistical software packages and will learn to carryout basic statistical tests including chi-squared tests, t-tests and correlation.

They will also be introduced to advanced statistical methods such as logistic regression, multivariable analysis and meta-analysis. Students will develop an understanding of some of the core activities of public health practice and methodological approaches underpinning public health practice.

Developmental Neuroscience

This module will provide you with a conceptual framework relevant to embryonic, foetal, neonatal, childhood and adolescent growth and development. You’ll be introduced to the pervasive concept of human development as a programmed evolution in structure and function of the brain.

You’ll explore the need for development in human neuroscience with reference to brain embryology; pre-term birth, brain tumours; and epilepsies, and other current clinical research areas, from new-borns to teenagers.

The Molecular Pathology of Cancer

This module uses colorectal cancer as a paradigm of neoplastic disease and covers the molecular basis of cancer, the clinicopathological manifestation of disease and translational research.

Innate Immunity and the Immunopathology of Inflammation

You will be build on previous learning and acquiring knowledge to extend and deepen your understanding of molecular and cellular aspects of innate immunity and gain knowledge and understanding of the mechanistic basis of inflammatory diseases.

This will also enable you to appreciate the development of novel forms of therapy for inflammatory diseases.

Clinical Applications of Current Neuroglia Research

The module will cover the following topics:

  • Introduction to neuroglia cells including historical perspectives and description of roles of neuroglia (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglia) in CNS physiology
  • The role and potentialuse as clinical targets of neuroglial cells in the following conditions will be described: insulininduced hypoglycaemia, demyelinating diseases, brain tumours, epilepsy and CNS regeneration
Respiratory Medicine

The course focuses on the clinical knowledge and basic research approaches to investigate:

  • Asthma
  • Chronic Pulmonary Obstructive Disease
  • Interstitial Lung Disease
  • Lung cancer and infection.
Clinical Renal Physiology and Therapeutics

Kidney disease is relatively common and its incidence is increasing because of the ageing population and increases in the incidence of obesity, diabetes mellitus and hypertension.

This module focuses on the pathology and treatment of kidney diseases. This will predominantly be within an overview of renal structure and function, the clinical features of, and diagnostic tools used in, kidney disease, the pathology,assessment and management of kidney diseases such as glomerular disease,vascular disease, nephrotic syndrome, and chronic kidney disease.

Patient safety, human error and avoiding harm in healthcare

This module considers:

  • the epidemiology of harm in healthcare
  • theories of what safety means in healthcare
  • models of how errors and harm occur
  • the role of investigation in reducing harm
  • the evidence for safety initiatives
  • the role of human factors in delivering safe healthcare
Malignant Haematology

This module will provide an overview of normal haematopoiesis and current concepts in normal and cancer haematopoietic stem cell biology.

It will also:

  • enable students to develop an appreciation of the causes, pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms of haematological malignancies
  • provide an insight into the laboratory tests important in the diagnosis, stratification and prognosis of specific malignant haematological conditions
  • provide an overview of the diagnosis, treatment and management of haematological malignancies
  • develop an appreciation of the rationale behind the national leukaemia trails
  • give students an overview of the principles of stem cell transplantation
  • demonstrate the new research findings (drugs, mutations, biomarkers etc) in malignant haematology which are improving management and outcome of patients and allowing the advancement of targeted therapy.
The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on

Your final two years form the majority of the Clinical Phase. You'll rotate through a series of six-week placements at major teaching hospitals and within primary care across the region. These years will provide you with the professional knowledge, skills, values, and behaviours to succeed through direct experience.

During both years you will have the option of student selected modules which can be at home or abroad and will end with a six-week placement of your choice and a medical assistantship to prepare you for the UK Foundation Programme.

Compulsory

Clinical Phase 1: Foundations for practice

This phase provides students with the opportunity to acquire and develop professional knowledge, skills, values and behaviours through experiential learning in primary care settings, outpatient clinics, operating theatres, the emergency room and patients’ homes. This is combined with seminars and simulation-based learning.

This phase will comprise of an introductory week followed by five sets of six-week placements in medicine, surgery, specialty skills, mental health and community-based medicine.

Placements are integrated to allow students to maximise their learning in each setting. After two placements there will be a formative assessment week, and at the end of the five placements students will have summative assessments. Students will progress to a 12-week block involving a two-week junior assistantship and 10 weeks of two or four-week Student Selected Modules (SSMs). Students will choose from a wide variety of SSMs from across Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Lincolnshire.

Clinical Phase 2: Advanced Practice

This final phase of the course is divided into two components: Advanced Practice 1 and Advanced Practice 2.

This part of the course is intended to prepare students for the transition to working as a Foundation doctor and enable appropriate preparation for the GMC Medical Licensing Assessment.

Advanced Practice will consist of an introductory week followed by a series of clinical placements including a formative assessment mid-way through between Advanced Practice 1 and 2. Topics covered will include: Health Care of Later Life; Leadership and Management training; Intermediate Medicine including Rheumatology; Cancer and Palliative Care; Child Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology; Advanced Primary Care; Critical Illness; Advanced Medicine and Surgery. Upon completion of these clinical placements, a revision week will be held followed by the final summative examinations.

Transition to Practice

The Transition to Practice programme is embedded in within the Advanced Practice phase. This is completed with a final 12-week period incorporating a six-week elective and a six-week senior medical assistantship.

The elective period is an opportunity for you to gain insight into medical practice in a different setting within the UK or anywhere in the world. The elective holds an exciting opportunity that will provide you with a chance to expand your skill set and overcome new challenges.

During the medical assistantship you will apply previous learning to the practical assessment and management of patients by workplace based learning. You will be expected to attain the level of practice of an FY1 doctor at the start of their employment being assessed by portfolio and logbook review. It will include shadowing a Foundation Year 1 doctor, and provides an excellent preparation for your own Foundation Year training.  

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for information on available modules. This content was last updated on

Fees and funding

UK students

£9,250
Per year

International students

To be confirmed in 2021*
Keep checking back for more information
*For full details including fees for part-time students and reduced fees during your time studying abroad or on placement (where applicable), see our fees page.

If you are a student from the EU, EEA or Switzerland starting your course in the 2022/23 academic year, you will pay international tuition fees.

This does not apply to Irish students, who will be charged tuition fees at the same rate as UK students. UK nationals living in the EU, EEA and Switzerland will also continue to be eligible for ‘home’ fee status at UK universities until 31 December 2027.

For further guidance, check our Brexit information for future students.

Additional costs

As a student on this course, you should factor some additional costs into your budget, alongside your tuition fees and living expenses such as travel and accommodation.

  • £40 for an enhanced DBS check, and you may wish to subscribe to the DBS update service for £13 per year.
  • £65+ for a stethoscope

You may need to buy some smart clothes to wear for clinical work settings.

You should be able to access the books and resources you need for the course through our libraries, however you may wish to purchase your own copies or get specific books which may cost up to £80 each.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School of Medicine covers costs for:

  • a laboratory coat
  • printer credit to the value of £200

In the final year of your course, students who live in the UK are eligible for NHS bursary funding (with some exceptions) which can help cover living costs and tuition fees.

Find out more about the NHS Bursary

Home students*

Over one third of our UK students receive our means-tested core bursary, worth up to £1,000 a year. Full details can be found on our financial support pages.

* A 'home' student is one who meets certain UK residence criteria. These are the same criteria as apply to eligibility for home funding from Student Finance.

International students

We offer a range of international undergraduate scholarships for high-achieving international scholars who can put their Nottingham degree to great use in their careers.

International scholarships

Careers

On graduating, you'll be able to provisionally register with the General Medical Council (GMC) for a licence to practice medicine in the UK. We'll help you through this process and provide support as you transition to the UK Foundation Programme.

To fully register with the GMC and be able to practice medicine unsupervised in the NHS or as part of a private practice, you will need to complete a Medical Licensing Assessment and complete the UK Foundation Programme.

Find out more about the GMC registration process

While most students continue in a traditional medical career to become doctors, a medicine degree can lead to careers in research, sales, journalism, illustration, communications, and economics and more.

Average starting salary and career progression

A doctor on the UK Foundation Programme can expect to start at £27,689 to £32,050.

As you gain experience as a doctor and develop your professional skills, you may progress on to senior clinical posts and earn up to £107,688 depending on your role and years of service.

98.8% of medicine undergraduates from the School of Medicine secured graduate level employment or further study within 15 months of graduation. The average annual salary for these graduates was £34,461.*

*HESA Graduate Outcomes 2020. The Graduate Outcomes % is derived using The Guardian University Guide methodology. The average annual salary is based on graduates working full-time within the UK.

Studying for a degree at the University of Nottingham will provide you with the type of skills and experiences that will prove invaluable in any career, whichever direction you decide to take.

Throughout your time with us, our Careers and Employability Service can work with you to improve your employability skills even further; assisting with job or course applications, searching for appropriate work experience placements and hosting events to bring you closer to a wide range of prospective employers.

Have a look at our careers page for an overview of all the employability support and opportunities that we provide to current students.

The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain’s leading graduate employers (Ranked in the top ten in The Graduate Market in 2013-2020, High Fliers Research).

General Medical Council (GMC)

This course is accredited by the General Medical Council (GMC). Upon graduation, you will be able to register provisionally with the GMC and begin the UK Foundation Programme. 

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" I chose Nottingham due to the amazing campus and the fact that the course had an integrated BMedSci. What also drew me in was the early clinical contact, so I knew I would be seeing patients from very early on. I love that I get to meet new people every day and being able to be with people in their time of need is a privilege. "
Ibrahim Mutlib, Medicine student

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Important information

This online prospectus has been drafted in advance of the academic year to which it applies. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate at the time of publishing, but changes (for example to course content) are likely to occur given the interval between publishing and commencement of the course. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply for the course where there has been an interval between you reading this website and applying.