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Course overview

Want to start your journey to become a doctor, but don't meet the traditional entry requirements?

Depending on your circumstances, the Medicine with a Foundation Year course could be your route to achieving your ambitions.

The welcoming Foundation Year gives you the benefit of small class sizes and a chance to form close relationships with your fellow students. This support network will, upon successful completion of your end of year exams, transition into the early years of Medicine.

The course is split into two phases:

  • the early years, where students learn the skills and knowledge required to become a doctor and complete a research project leading to a BMedSci
  • the later years, called the Clinical Phase, where students put their learning into practice on placements at hospitals and GP surgeries

You'll be taught by experienced tutors in a medical school with almost 50 years' experience training doctors and an excellent reputation for teaching and research. You'll be able to explore a broad range of research areas as part of your studies alongside national and international leaders in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cancer research, mental health technology and more.

Medical students at Nottingham join a great student community, with a student-led society that is always putting on events throughout the year and provides support in the form of peer mentoring and more.

At Nottingham you'll get the clinical skills you need for a successful career in medicine and still have time to enjoy your university experience.

Advice on applying to medicine

Medical Schools Council advice on applying to study Medicine

Medical School admissions updates from the Medical School Council during the COVID-19 pandemic

UCAS

All applications must be made in UCAS by 15 October.

If you wish to make a change from another medicine course to a University of Nottingham medicine course on UCAS within 14 days of submitting your choices, please ensure the change is made before 15 October or your application will be unsuccessful.

Application Timeline

If you meet our entry requirements, you will be invited for the Multiple Mini Interviews stage usually between December and January.

We usually issue offers in February.

Access and support

You must be 17 or older on 1 September of the year you will begin your course to be considered.

If you have a disability or any ongoing health issues, please seek advice from the School of Medicine before applying. We welcome students who have a disability but we also have a responsibility to ensure all students will be eligible for registration by the General Medical Council on graduation.

Find out more about the available School of Medicine support

Medicine at Lincoln

You can also apply for this course at Lincoln Medical School. If you apply for both, you will only need to be interviewed once. It is possible to get offers from both, or one or the other.

Clearing

Due to the popularity of this course, we do not usually go into Clearing.

Previous medicine applicants

Previous unsuccessful applicants can re-apply for the course once and will be considered against other current applicants. Any previous applicants who caused significant reservations during the selection process will be rejected.

We do not accept applications from those who have previously been studying on a medicine course at this, or another medical school. We also don't allow students to transfer onto our medical courses.

Intercalating

We do not offer intercalating as part of this course (where a student takes a year out of their medical studies to complete a second degree) as the BMedSci is integrated into the course structure.

However students do have an option to suspend their studies after their BMedSci to take a Masters or PhD degree before completing their BMBS.

Excluded students database

When offering places to students we check the MSC Excluded Students Database as part of our commitment to professionalism and fitness to practise.

If either we or another medical school have terminated your studies, your details are shared with regulatory bodies and other medical schools through this database.

Why choose this course?

  • Complete a Bachelor of Medical Sciences (BMedSci) degree in your fourth year. You'll undertake a supervised research project in an area you find interesting without needing to study for an extra year
  • Learn in purpose-built facilities and be part of a small group of students in your first year at our modern medical school at the Royal Derby Hospital
  • Learn anatomy using full-body dissection
  • A case-based learning course which makes use of real patient scenarios and focuses you on their key clinical points
  • Work with patients through regular visits to GPs from as early as your first term in your second year and hospitals in your final years
  • Experience placements across a range of NHS trusts in Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire

Entry requirements

All candidates are considered on an individual basis and we accept a broad range of qualifications. The entrance requirements below apply to 2021 entry.

UK entry requirements
A level offer BBC including biology (or human biology) and chemistry
IB score 28 (5, 5, 5 at Higher Level including biology and chemistry, excluding core component) GCSEs as above (or equivalent)

Standard Entry Requirements

This course is only open to students who are living in the UK and have UK home status, indefinite leave to remain or refugee status (with a letter from the home office as evidence) at the time you make your application.

You must also meet the following criteria:

You cannot apply to both the five year Medicine course and the Medicine with a Foundation Year course.

If you meet the entry requirements for the five-year Medicine course, you must only apply for the five-year Medicine course.

If you achieve ABB at A Level, choose to resit one or both of your B grades and are predicted to achieve all standard or contextual entry requirements for the five-year Medicine course, you must only apply for the five-year Medicine course.

A Levels

BBC: must include a B in both biology (or human biology) and chemistry. A pass is required in science practical tests, where these are assessed separately.

We will not accept citizenship studies, critical thinking, general studies, or global perspectives as your third grade.

You must study three A levels for two years and meet the entry requirements, however you can take an extra A level a year earlier or later if needed to meet the entry requirements or recommended by your school or college.

Please note we do not usually accept A levels which have taken three years to complete.

We do not accept A Level resits.

GCSEs

Five GCSEs at Grade 6 (B).

You must study biology, chemistry and physics as either individual subjects, triple science or double science. You must also study English language and maths.

We do not accept any GCSE resits.

We do not accept applied science, short course GCSEs or functional skills for English and maths.

GCSEs taken over multiple years will be accepted for home schooled students as long as they meet the entry requirements.

IB

28 (5, 5, 5 at Higher Level including Biology and Chemistry, excluding core component) GCSEs as above (or equivalent)

We will accept either of the maths qualifications for the IB at standard level (SL) or higher level (HL).

English language

If your home country is not the UK, but you moved to the UK (with indefinite leave to remain) within two years before taking GCSE English language or equivalent and did not achieve Level 6 then we will accept one of the following qualifications:

  • IELTS 7.5 (no less than 7.0 in any element)
  • Pearson Test of English (Academic) 73 (minimum 67)
  • Cambridge Proficiency/Advanced test (from January 2015) 191 with no element below 185

Work Experience

Applicants should complete regular work experience when applying for medicine. 

This can be:

  • Volunteering in a care related setting
  • Volunteering with disadvantaged groups
  • Paid employment in a job working with the general public

Please note, we are not expecting any work experience to have taken place or be ongoing after March 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic. Your application for 2021 entry will not be negatively affected if you’ve been unable to complete work experience you had planned.

As part of your application we usually ask for evidence of your work experience. This may include a description of the experience, dates for when it took place, and a reference contact.

We usually send a form to candidates to complete during the application process.

If possible we'd advise that you speak to someone working in the NHS to ensure you are making an informed choice about your career in medicine.

We expect you to demonstrate a commitment to caring for people and a realistic idea of what working as a doctor entails.

Any students considering a gap year should use their time constructively either by working or further preparing yourself for a future career in medicine.

Interview and Test

You must also complete the University Clinical Aptitude Test (UCAT) in the same year you are applying. We do not accept the BioMedical Admissions Test (BMAT) for entry.

We do not have a fixed UCAT threshold score when selecting for interview.

We do not accept applicants who achieve Band 4 on the Situational Judgement Test on the UCAT.

You will be required to have an interview. This will take the form of Multiple Mini Interviews (MMI).

Interviews are offered to the top percentage of candidates based on their combined UCAT and GCSE or equivalent scores. The percentage threshold varies from year to year based on the number of applicants.

Find out more about the UCAT

Fitness to practise

We must be confident in your conduct, health and ability to be professional and interact safely with patients.

As part of your application you will be required to have an occupational health assessment and a disclosure and barring service (DBS) check.

If we have any serious concerns we will not offer you a place, and reserve the right to revoke offers should serious concerns arise before starting the course.

Find out more about fitness to practise

Offers

All offers are made subject to being successful at interview, and having a satisfactory occupational health assessment, DBS clearance, and no fitness to practise issues.

If you are still studying for the required qualifications and your predicted grades meet the entry requirements, offers will be conditional on you achieving those grades.

If you have already met the entry requirements, offers will be unconditional subject to having a satisfactory occupational health assessment, DBS clearance, and no fitness to practise issues.

Find out more about the undergraduate selection process.

Learning and assessment

How you will learn

Teaching methods

  • Anatomy sessions
  • Case-based learning
  • Clinical relevance sessions
  • Clinical skills sessions
  • eLearning
  • Full-body dissection
  • Lab sessions
  • Lectures
  • Placements
  • Practical classes
  • Self-study
  • Seminars
  • Small group learning
  • Tutorials

How you will be assessed

Assessment methods

  • Case studies
  • Clinical exams
  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Examinations
  • Formative assessments
  • Logbooks
  • Objective structured clinical exams
  • Poster presentation
  • Practical exams
  • Presentation
  • Short project
  • Verbal exam
  • Workplace-based assessment

Contact time and study hours

During your first year you will have around 12 hours of teaching contact with 25 hours of independent study per week.

During your second, third and fourth years you will have approximately 16 to 18 hours of teaching contact time with around 20 hours of independent study per week. You'll spend around five days on placement each semester.

During your time on the Clinical Phase you will spend between 35 – 40 hours across five days every week studying and on placements. You’ll spend around two to three days on ward, clinic or GP placement visits per week with one day of independent study and one to two days of teaching contact time. This will include some time on call and some out of hours work.

Study abroad

During the final few years of your course, you'll have the opportunity to study abroad on exchanges with other medical students from across the globe. Past destinations have included Croatia, Germany, Malaysia, Norway, Slovakia, and Spain.

Students are also given a six-week elective placement at the end of their final year which they can also spend abroad.

Placements

The course includes 15 main placements over the clinical phase, with each lasting up to six weeks. There are also 10 weeks of student selected modules and a six-week elective placement.

You will experience a range of settings including medical, surgical, specialty skills, mental health and community-based medicine. Placements are located within four large NHS trusts in the region, as well as with general practices.

During placements, you will be supported by experienced clinical mentors.

Placements can take place in:

  • Nottingham at the Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham City Hospital, and Highbury Hospital
  • Derby at Royal Derby Hospital
  • Mansfield at King's Mill Hospital
  • Chesterfield at Chesterfield Royal Hospital
  • GP practices across the region

Find out more about where clinical placements take place

Modules

Typical Year One Modules

Your first year you will study all the important elements of biology and chemistry required for your studies throughout the rest of the course.

In addition, you will cover key topics in professionalism and communication and have your learning set in clinical context where appropriate.

You will undertake learning in fundamental subjects including anatomy, microanatomy and microbiology.

This year is predominantly studied at the Royal Derby Hospital Centre.

Cells and Tissues

This module considers the particulars of cell and tissue biology. You will explore a number of topics including: prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function, organelles, biological membranes, cell division, transport across membranes, and tissue types. For this module you will have a blended mix of taught classes, laboratory practicals, independent study exercises and e-learning.

Organic Chemistry

This module considers the particulars of organic chemistry. You will consider the role of carbon in living things. You will consider the structure of carbon compounds such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, and carboxylic acids.  For this module you will have a combination of taught classes, laboratory practicals, completion of workbooks, e-learning and self-directed learning, totalling 21 hours in the autumn semester.

Biological Molecules

This module is concerned with biological molecules. The content covered in this module includes: water, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, protein, nucleic acids, vitamins, and minerals. For this module you will have a mix of taught classes, laboratory practicals, completion of workbooks, e-learning and self-directed learning.

Human Genetics

This module considers aspects of medical genetics. You will consider many issues in genetics including genetic variation, inheritance, mutation, human karyotyping, dominance and co-dominance, cloning and gene therapy. You will consider human inherited conditions such as cystic fibrosis, colour blindness, sickle-cell disease and others. For this module you’ll have a combination of taught classes, completion of workbooks and e-learning.

Inorganic Chemistry

In this module you will consider the particulars in relation to inorganic chemistry. You will consider atomic structure, the periodic table and periodicity, acids, bases and salts, solutions and suspensions, chemical reactions, enthalpy of reactions and oxidation and reduction. For this module you will have a mix of taught classes, laboratory practicals, completion of workbooks, e-learning and self-directed learning, with contact time totalling 78 hours over the course of the year.

Introduction to Microbiology

This course will provide an introduction to basic microbiology. It will cover fundamental aspects of the structure, growth, replication and significance of major groups of microbes with emphasis on bacteria and viruses. Nutritional and physical requirements for growth, propagation and measurement of growth as well as procedures for killing microbes will be dealt with. Students will also be introduced to the topics of infectious disease and the significance of microbiology to industry. In practical sessions students will learn aseptic technique, routine light microscopy, basic skills in handling, growing, isolating and identifying bacteria, and general safe laboratory techniques.

Professional and Communication Skills

This module begins to introduce the process of personal and professional development of future doctors by requiring regular reflection, action planning and documentation of their progress through the Foundation Year. It also comprises an introduction to the areas of basic communication and clinical skills and professionalism through exploring lifestyle factors and their influence on health, the NHS and topical medical and ethical issues, health psychology and health promotion. The module develops research and study skills, academic writing, building resilience, communication and counselling skills, clinical skills, record keeping and information governance.

Study Skills

This module relates to the practical skills needed to help you with your studies and in your future career. This module will cover skills including: information gathering, recording information, data analysis, time management, effective scientific writing and laboratory reports, referencing, computer skills, and examination success. For this module you will have a mix of taught classes, workbooks, e-learning and self-directed learning, with contact time totalling 21 hours of contact time over the course of the year.

Health, Behaviour and Society

This module is related to the particulars of health, behaviour and society. The content covered in this module includes: health psychology, health promotion, and coping with illness. This module also considers lifestyle factors and their influence on health including exercise, diet, tobacco, alcohol and stress. For this module you will have a blended mix of taught classes, completion of workbooks, and self-directed learning totalling 21 hours of contact time over the course of the year. 

Biochemical Processes

This module is concerned with biochemical processes. For this module you will consider proteins including primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure and function, enzyme structure, enzyme function and activity, DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular respiration. For this module you will have a combination of taught classes, laboratory practicals, completion of workbooks and e-learning. 

Body Structure

This module is concerned with body structure. You will be introduced to anatomy, organs and organ systems including alimentary canal, blood vessels, brain and spinal cord, heart including changes that occur at birth, kidney, liver, and lungs. You’ll also be taught about the peripheral nerves, reproductive organs, and the skeleton and muscles. For this module you will have a blended mix of taught classes, completion of workbooks, e-learning and self-directed learning.

Body Processes

This module is concerned with body processes. You will cover topics including: absorption, filtration and reabsorption in the body, chemical digestion, gaseous exchange, immune response such as the innate and acquired immunity, muscle contraction, and nerve impulses and how they are transmitted and their coordination. In this module you will have a combination of taught classes, laboratory practicals, completion of workbooks and e-learning.

The above is a sample of the typical modules that we offer at the date of publication but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. This prospectus may be updated over the duration of the course, as modules may change due to developments in the curriculum or in the research interests of staff.

In your second year, you'll move to the Medical School at Nottingham and you'll develop an understanding of the scientific and professional basics of medicine. You will then be taught subjects on themes based on overarching clinical problems: specifically respiratory and cardiovascular medicine, the musculoskeletal system, and cancer.

There is also the opportunity to reinforce your learning through hospital and general practice visits.

In the spring semester, students have the chance to study an optional module, looking into specific topics in a bit more depth.

Scientific Basis of Medicine

This module contributes to developing an understanding of the scientific basis of clinical practice. In particular the module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of fundamental biochemical, physiological and anatomical concepts and their relation to disease processes. This is delivered by lectures, popular topics sessions, directed reading, private study, workshops and practical classes. The theme-based content will include: Cells, Biochemical Basics, Tissues of the Body, Muscle, Nerves, Pharmacology, Blood and Infection, Reproduction, Inflammation and Metabolism.

Professional Basis of Medicine

This module contributes to developing an understanding of the doctor as a professional. Students will be taught the basic knowledge, skills and attitudes required for the assessment and management of patients. Students will be introduced to the concept of the patient as a whole person. They will be asked to consider challenging ethical scenarios. The module will provide students with some basic clinical skills and introduce them to theoretical and statistical approaches to understanding health.

Respiratory and Cardiovascular Medicine

This module provides an introduction to the basic anatomy and physiology of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems together with fundamentals in haematology, in terms of physiological control mechanisms, the pathophysiology and pharmacological approaches to treating common disease states. This is delivered by lectures, popular topics sessions, directed reading, private study, workshops, practical classes and hospital and general practice clinical visits.

Musculoskeletal and Trauma

The module develops a working knowledge of the normal structure and function of the musculoskeletal system. In addition to looking at normal structure and function, there is an opportunity to study the basic pathophysiology of disease development, related clinical skills, some potential treatments and the basic principles of drug therapy in some common diseases. In clinical visits, students will focus on musculoskeletal examination, developing clinical skills of assessing a patient with a potential fracture and examination of the musculoskeletal system.

Students will receive an introduction to sports medicine and physiotherapy and explore the factors that lead to errors in diagnosis and treatment, including appreciation of human fallibility and performance influencers. Students will also learn more about evidence-based medicine. The module is taught through lectures, workshops, practicals and dissection classes as well as hospital and general practice clinical visits. There is also a requirement for private study to attain the knowledge and understanding outcomes specified in the module description.

Cancer

This module contributes to developing an understanding of the scientific basis of clinical practice. In particular the module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of disease processes associated with cancer; the anatomy of the neck shoulder and upper limbs; clinical skills associated with examination of the cardiovascular system. This is delivered by lectures, case studies, directed reading, private study, workshops, anatomical examination and clinical skills training sessions. 

The theme-based content will include:

  • Anatomy – triangles of the neck; axilla and shoulder; mammary gland; lymphatics; nerve plexuses
  • Molecular medicine – molecular basis of the control of cell cycle and cell growth; the biology, pathology and genetics of cancer; respiratory failure
  • Pharmacology – Biologics as novel therapeutics
  • Physiology – Nutrition and cancer
  • Professional development – Health beliefs and culture; examination of the cardiovascular system; communicating with distressed people
  • Public health – interpreting and communicating risks; screening and diagnostic testing

Students will be introduced to the concept of randomized controlled trials and will reinforce their learning during further general practice clinical visits.

Optional modules

Medicine Optional Modules
  • Clinical Toxicology
  • Narratives & Health
  • History of Anatomy & Medicine
  • Cancer staging and grading
  • Risky Business (preventing medical error)
  • A closer view of the eye
  • Introduction to psychiatry
  • Molecular medicine
  • Medical microbiology
  • Creative clinical communication
  • Translational neuro-oncology
The above is a sample of the typical modules that we offer at the date of publication but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. This prospectus may be updated over the duration of the course, as modules may change due to developments in the curriculum or in the research interests of staff.

Your third year continues your theme based teaching, looking into a variety of other clinical problems. In each semester you will be able to take an optional module which interests you most.

Gastrointestinal Medicine

This module aims to develop knowledge and understanding of fundamental biochemical, physiological, pharmacological and anatomical concepts and their relation to gastrointestinal disease processes. The module will provide an introduction to the alimentary system, and important aspects of nutrition and metabolism. This is to be delivered by lectures, practicals, workshops and private study. The theme-based context will include topics related to malnutrition, luminal gastroenterology and liver disease. The students will be continuing their general practice clinical visits, with a special focus on patients with gastrointestinal conditions. They will also be taught the skills of history taking and examination for patients with abdominal/ alimentary conditions. Students will also revisit the concept of safety, considering foresight, hazard awareness and risk. Students will also be introduced to measures of disease frequency and its relevance in clinical medicine.

Renal

This module provides an introduction to the renal system, a key system involved in whole body homeostasis. The introduction to the renal system covers basic physiology, pharmacology, anatomy and histology. It includes descriptions of the intrarenal circulation and its relation to tubular elements, the processes located to the proximal tubule, loop of Henlé, distal tubule and collecting duct, and the integration of these systems in the control of extracellular fluid volume and osmolality (including hormonal mechanisms) and in acid-base balance. The module is delivered by lectures, workshops, practical classes, case studies, directed reading, private study, and clinical visits to general practice. Problem solving classes examine the use of diuretics and disorders of acid-base balance. Two plenary clinical sessions deal with the consequences of renal failure. Students will continue their general practice visits. They will also explore the role of non-technical skills in healthcare with a focus on teamwork, communication, decision making and situation monitoring. 

Endocrine and Reproduction

This introduction to the endocrine system will cover basic physiology, pharmacology, anatomy, histology and outline clinical features. This will provide the knowledge base for management of disease. This module will include the non-reproductive endocrine system with particular attention on pituitary, adrenal, thyroid and pancreatic function. As the endocrine system is a key system involved in whole body homeostasis, principles of control and integration of metabolism will be re-visited. This introduction to the reproductive system will cover basic physiology, pharmacology, anatomy, histology and outline clinical features. This will provide the knowledge base for management of disease. This module will include the male and female reproductive system and pregnancy with particular attention on function of the ovary and testes, endometrial, cervical epithelial and prostate gland changes, placental physiology, problems in pregnancy and hormonal control of the reproductive system.

The students will be continuing their general practice clinical visits, with a special focus on patients with an endocrine condition and will be taught diversity in sexuality and how to challenge attitudes of prejudice. Students will examine eyes and ears using an otoscope and ophthalmoscope respectively. They will also be introduced to the concepts of systems and basic quality improvement approaches in healthcare. Further epidemiological analysis and the basis of evidence-based medicine will be introduced. Having previously considered why errors occur they will explore the steps and role of incident analysis in healthcare, including Duty of Candour.  

Central Nervous System

This module provides an introduction to the basic anatomy, physiology, pharmacology and psychology of the central nervous system. The module aims to develop knowledge of these fundamental principles within the context of relevant weekly themes. The theme-based content will begin with a focus on depression and anxiety.

Students will be provided with a general introduction to the relevant brain anatomy followed by an in depth examination of the system physiology and pharmacology. The depression and anxiety theme will include individual sessions on the limbic system, emotion and mood, and treatment strategies. Ultimately, this will provide the basis for understanding theme based functions and the production of behaviours. Subsequent weekly themes include: pain (including sessions on neuropsychology of pain, the use of anaesthetics, and pain management), movement disorders (including sessions on the anatomy and pharmacology of movement, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and executive function), dementia (including sessions on Alzheimer’s disease, neuropsychological assessment, and memory), sensory disorders (including sessions on the visual and auditory systems and epilepsy), and finally serious mental illness (including sessions on neurotransmission, attention, language, and schizophrenia).

Integrated Module

This module gives students an opportunity to undertake problem-based learning. Working in small groups, students will evaluate cases centred around the life cycle to include children, young adults, middle age and the older patient. Each week culminates in a plenary session where scientists and clinicians will discuss each case based upon student direction.

Optional modules

Autumn semester
  • Sport and exercise medicine
  • Advanced anatomical sciences
  • Physics of the body
  • Lymphatic organs and antigen presentation
  • Molecular immunology and autoimmunity
  • Molecular medicine
  • Creative medicine
  • Drugs of abuse
  • No research about me, without me
  • Pre-clinical drug screening
Spring semester
  • Pain
  • Exploring bones
  • Defects in development
  • Cranial nerves revisited
  • Molecular diagnostics
  • Complementary and alternative medicines
  • Neuron connectivity
  • Hearing healthcare
  • Introduction to sensory neuroscience
  • Introduction to R*
  • Improving your chances of publication
The above is a sample of the typical modules that we offer at the date of publication but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. This prospectus may be updated over the duration of the course, as modules may change due to developments in the curriculum or in the research interests of staff.

Your fourth year begins with a supervised research project in an area of your choice and an accompanying Research Methods module to help with the project. You are also able to take two optional advanced medical science modules which may or may not be related to your project. This will lead to being awarded the BMedSci.

Following your project you'll begin the Clinical Phase which will see you rotate through a series of placements at major teaching hospitals and within primary care across the region.

Research Methods

In this module some topics will be taught centrally to all third year students and others within the homebase where your research project is located. The module includes the following topics: literature retrieval and creation and management of a bibliography; scientific writing including the presentation of research data; study methods and study design including formulating and testing hypotheses; evidence-based medicine; human and animal research ethics; critical analysis of a scientific paper; statistical analysis of research data. 

Honours Year Project

In your chosen area for your research, you’ll spend year three working on your Honours Year project in which you will carry out your project to test the hypothesis formulated in the research methods module. The form of the project can vary and may be based on laboratory work, audit, patient studies or an extended literature review with proof of critical engagement. A submission of around 10,000 words is expected as your project write-up. A range of optional modules related to Research Project are shown below. 

The Treatment and Prevention of Infection

In this module you’ll build on previous learning to acquire knowledge, skills and attitudes of direct clinical relevance for the management of infection, particularly in a hospital setting. The module is divided into three parts; the general properties of antimicrobial agents, the general principles of the management of infection and antimicrobial chemotherapy in practice. You’ll have around nine hours per week of lectures, the majority of which are delivered by consultant microbiologists, or an antimicrobial pharmacist, from a local partner hospital. 

Optional modules

Antibiotics: Origins, Targets and the Bacterial Resistome

This module will focus on antibiotics that target two essential cell processes in bacteria: DNA replication and gene transcription. Lectures will cover the fundamental principles of these processes, and the origins, structures and functions of antibiotics developed against them. You’ll then assess how bacteria gain resistance to these antibiotics through mutation and selection, and the known mechanisms of how resistance spreads through microbial communities.

Anti-Cancer Therapies and Cardiovascular Disease

This module focuses on how cancer therapies have developed in recent years, and how the long-term cardiovascular effects of these treatments in cancer survivors should be considered.

Six lectures will cover: an introduction to cancer therapy, the role of VEGF in tumour angiogenesis, anti-VEGF cancer therapies, cardiovascular consequences of anti-cancer treatment, the role of alternative splicing and molecular targeting in cancer and future strategies for cancer therapy.

Cancer (year three)

This module provides a clinical overview of cancer including: the molecular biology of cancer, cancer angiogenesis, pre-clinical modelling of cancer, clinical trials and adjuvant treatments in cancer, and breast cancer: biology and treatment and new biological treatments for cancer. You’ll have nine hours of direct teaching with further home-based reading assignments and self-directed learning.

Clinical Microbiology

This module will explore microbiology in the clinical environment, in particular: medical virology in the context of cancer, pathogenesis, the clinical consequences infections and their management, and prevention and management and control of hospital-acquired infections. You’ll have seven 1-hour taught sessions although the module is largely self-directed learning.

Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

In this module you’ll cover key topics including a revision of functional neuroanatomy and understanding functional connectivity between brain regions, focussing specifically on brain circuits underlying cognitive function and an introduction to imaging methods (EEG,MRI, fMRI). You’ll build your knowledge and understanding of major neuropsychiatric disorders and current research in these fields including schizophrenia, Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, depression and, autism and disorders of social cognition. 

Developmental Neuroscience

This module will provide you with a conceptual framework relevant to embryonic, foetal, neonatal, childhood and adolescent growth and development. You’ll be introduced to the pervasive concept of human development as a programmed evolution in structure and function of the brain. You’ll explore the need for development in human neuroscience with reference to brain embryology; pre-term birth, brain tumours; and epilepsies, and other current clinical research areas, from new-borns to teenagers. You’ll have six hours of direct contact time.

The above is a sample of the typical modules that we offer at the date of publication but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. This prospectus may be updated over the duration of the course, as modules may change due to developments in the curriculum or in the research interests of staff.

Your final two years form the majority of the Clinical Phase. You'll rotate through a series of six-week placements at major teaching hospitals and within primary care across the region. These years will provide you with the professional knowledge, skills, values, and behaviours to succeed through direct experience.

During both years you will have the option of student selected modules which can be at home or abroad and will end with a six-week placement of your choice and a medical assistantship to prepare you for the UK Foundation Programme.

Clinical Phase 1: Foundations for practice

This phase provides students with the opportunity to acquire and develop professional knowledge, skills, values and behaviours through experiential learning in primary care settings, outpatient clinics, operating theatres, the emergency room and patients’ homes. This is combined with seminars and simulation-based learning.

This phase will comprise of an introductory week followed by five sets of six-week placements in medicine, surgery, specialty skills, mental health and community-based medicine.

Placements are integrated to allow students to maximise their learning in each setting. After two placements there will be a formative assessment week, and at the end of the five placements students will have summative assessments. Students will progress to a 12-week block involving a two-week junior assistantship and 10 weeks of two or four-week Student Selected Modules (SSMs). Students will choose from a wide variety of SSMs from across Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Lincolnshire.

Clinical Phase 2: Advanced Practice

This final phase of the course is intended to prepare students for the transition to working as a Foundation doctor and enable appropriate preparation for the GMC Medical Licensing Assessment.

Advanced Practice will consist of an introductory week followed by a series of clinical placements including a formative assessment mid-way through. Topics covered will include: Health Care of Later Life; Leadership and Management training; Intermediate Medicine including Rheumatology; Cancer and Palliative Care; Child Health, Obstetrics and Gynaecology; Advanced Primary Care; Critical Illness; Advanced Medicine and Surgery. Upon completion of these clinical placements, a revision week will be held followed by the final summative examinations.

Transition to Practice

The Transition to Practice programme is embedded in within the Advanced Practice phase. This is completed with a final 12-week period incorporating a six-week elective and a six-week senior medical assistantship.

The elective period is an opportunity for you to gain insight into medical practice in a different setting within the UK or anywhere in the world. The elective holds an exciting opportunity that will provide you with a chance to expand your skill set and overcome new challenges.

During the medical assistantship you will apply previous learning to the practical assessment and management of patients by workplace based learning. You will be expected to attain the level of practice of an FY1 doctor at the start of their employment being assessed by portfolio and logbook review. It will include shadowing a Foundation Year 1 doctor, and provides an excellent preparation for your own Foundation Year training.  

The above is a sample of the typical modules that we offer at the date of publication but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. This prospectus may be updated over the duration of the course, as modules may change due to developments in the curriculum or in the research interests of staff.

Fees and funding

UK students

£9,250
Per year

International students

Not available for course*
Per year
*For full details including fees for part-time students and reduced fees during your time studying abroad or on placement (where applicable), see our fees page.

EU tuition fees and funding options for courses starting in 2021/22 have not yet been confirmed by the UK government. For further guidance, check our Brexit information for future students.

Additional costs

As a student on this course, you should factor some additional costs into your budget, alongside your tuition fees and living expenses such as travel and accommodation.

  • £40 for an enhanced DBS check, and you may wish to subscribe to the DBS update service for £13 per year.
  • £65+ for a stethoscope

You may need to buy some smart clothes to wear for clinical work settings.

You should be able to access the books and resources you need for the course through our libraries, however you may wish to purchase your own copies or get specific books which may cost up to £80 each.

Scholarships and bursaries

The School of Medicine covers costs for:

  • A laboratory coat
  • A travel bursary (provided for students on placement in the clinical years of the programme)
  • Printer credit to the value of £200

In the final two years of your course, students who live in the UK are eligible for NHS bursary funding which can help cover living costs and tuition fees.

Find out more about the NHS Bursary

The University of Nottingham offers a wide range of bursaries and scholarships. These funds can provide you with an additional source of non-repayable financial help. For up to date information regarding tuition fees, visit our fees and finance pages.

Home students*

Over one third of our UK students receive our means-tested core bursary, worth up to £1,000 a year. Full details can be found on our financial support pages.

* A 'home' student is one who meets certain UK residence criteria. These are the same criteria as apply to eligibility for home funding from Student Finance.

Careers

On graduating, you'll be able to provisionally register with the General Medical Council for a licence to practice medicine in the UK.

To fully register with the GMC and be able to practice medicine unsupervised in the NHS or as part of a private practice, you will need to complete a Medical Licensing Assessment and complete the UK Foundation Programme.

Find out more about the GMC registration process

While most students continue in a traditional medical career to become doctors, a medicine degree can lead to careers in research, sales, journalism, illustration, communications, and economics and more.

Average starting salary and career progression

A doctor on the UK Foundation Programme can expect to start at £27,689 to £32,050.

As you gain experience as a doctor and develop your professional skills, you may progress on to senior clinical posts and earn up to £107,688 depending on your role and years of service.

Studying for a degree at the University of Nottingham will provide you with the type of skills and experiences that will prove invaluable in any career, whichever direction you decide to take.

Throughout your time with us, our Careers and Employability Service can work with you to improve your employability skills even further; assisting with job or course applications, searching for appropriate work experience placements and hosting events to bring you closer to a wide range of prospective employers.

Have a look at our careers page for an overview of all the employability support and opportunities that we provide to current students.

The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain’s leading graduate employers (Ranked in the top ten in The Graduate Market in 2013-2020, High Fliers Research).

General Medical Council (GMC)

This course is accredited by the General Medical Council (GMC). Upon graduation, you will be able to register provisionally with the GMC and begin the UK Foundation Programme. 

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" I chose the University of Nottingham for my six year course because it offered everything I wanted: beautiful scenery, an integrated BMedSci degree that keeps me competitive, and full-body dissection which allows me to integrate my knowledge with practical skills. What I like about studying in Nottingham is the opportunities it has provided me with to become what I have always wanted! "
Daniel McDonald-Smith, Medicine with a Foundation Year BMBS

Related courses

The University has been awarded Gold for outstanding teaching and learning

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) 2017-18

Disclaimer

This online prospectus has been drafted in advance of the academic year to which it applies. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate at the time of publishing, but changes (for example to course content) are likely to occur given the interval between publishing and commencement of the course. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply for the course where there has been an interval between you reading this website and applying.