logo
Department of Classics
   
   
  

 If you wish to get in touch with our administrative staff, please see the admin staff contact page.

Image of Mark Bradley

Mark Bradley

Associate Professor of Ancient History; Faculty Director of Teaching, Faculty of Arts

Contact

Biography

Background

I was born and raised in Wakefield in West Yorkshire, and went to school at Batley Grammar School where I developed interests in ancient history and Latin. I was awarded a place to study Classics at King's College, Cambridge, where I completed my B.A., M.Phil and PhD between 1995 and 2004. I wrote my doctoral thesis on 'Concepts of Colour in Ancient Rome' under the supervision of Mary Beard, to whom I owe a great deal for my interests and inspiration in Roman history and culture. During my PhD, I was appointed to a two-year Faculty Lectureship in Ancient History in the Faculty of Classics at Cambridge, and shortly after I completed the PhD in Spring 2004 I was appointed to my position at Nottingham.

Research interests

My main research interests are in the visual and intellectual culture of imperial Rome, and my work has been particularly concerned with exploring cultural differences in perception, aesthetics and sensibilities. My first book Colour and Meaning in Ancient Rome was published with Cambridge University Press in November 2009, and was longlisted for the 2011 Warwick Prize for Writing. I am also the author of several articles in the field of Roman visual culture (particularly the role of colour and form on marble sculpture), and am currently developing (along with Shane Butler, Johns Hopkins) a series of volumes on 'The Senses in Antiquity' for Routledge. The first of these, on the theme of 'Synaesthesia', was published in summer 2013, and I have recently edited the second instalment on Smell and the Ancient Senses, which was published in December 2014. I am also writing a journal article on the theme of 'Roman noses', partly exploring Roman approaches to smell, and partly examining the relationship between nose size/ shape and character/ behaviour in ancient thought.

I also have interests in the reception of the ancient world in modern European culture, and I am editor of Classics and Imperialism in the British Empire (2010, Oxford University Press), a collection of essays examining the interactive relationship between classical ideas and British imperialism from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century.

As well as pursuing further research on each of these topics, I am also engaged in a long-term research project on the theme of pollution in pre-Christian Roman society, religion and culture, a topic on which I already have a number of articles. I am editor of a volume titled Rome, Pollution and Propriety: Dirt, Disease and Hygiene in the Eternal City from Antiquity to Modernity (2012, Cambridge University Press), which is based on a conference held at the British School at Rome in June 2007. I am currently working on a book on Foul Bodies in Ancient Rome, which sets out to understand how Romans of the early Empire formulated and mobilized disgust as a response to bodies that were perceived to be 'out of place' in civilized society. My first foray into this field, a study of obesity in Roman art, was published in Papers of the British School at Rome in 2011.

Administration

I am currently Director of Teaching for the Faculty of Arts and Director of Postgraduate Teaching for the School of Humanities.

In the past, I have acted as Postgraduate Recruitment Officer and Undergraduate Admissions Officer for the Department of Classics. I was Director of Postgraduate Studies for the School of Humanities (both PGT and PGR) from 2012-2015, and Head of Taught Postgraduate Courses for the Faculty of Arts from 2013-2015.

Throughout my career, I have been warmly supported by the British School at Rome, where I have carried out a great deal of my research and to which I owe a great debt. I am currently a member of the BSR's Faculty of Archaeology, History and Letters, and Editor of the Papers of the British School at Rome. I am also a member of the Classical Association Journals Board, which oversees Classical Quarterly, Classical Review and Greece & Rome.

Expertise Summary

My teaching at Undergraduate and Masters level engages principally with ancient history and visual culture, particularly that of late Republican and early Imperial Rome. I have convened modules on Roman religion and early Rome, as well as the role of Classics in modern popular culture. In 2012, I taught a new module on 'Colour and culture in the Mediterranean world', which is based on the work of my first book and explores the role and significance of colour perception in Greco-Roman culture. I have also convened and taught key first-year and second-year modules on the Roman world, classics and popular culture, and the Extended Source Study, as well as a new module on Studying Classical Scholarship. I am also trained in advanced Latin and Greek language and literature and have taught both at all levels.

I also have skills in the interpretation of visual culture (alongside literary and linguistic material) and have published articles on the interpretation of coloured marbles in early imperial Rome and the significance of paint on ancient marble sculpture, as well as my book on the role and significance of colour in ancient Rome. I am referee for the 'Copenhagen Polychromy Network Project', an initiative based at the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek at Copenhagen to further the study and reconstruction of paint traces on classical sculpture. From 2011-2014, I was also Director of Nottingham University's Urban Culture Network, and in 2014 co-organised a major cross-displinary conference on 'Urban Mapping: Approaches to Cartography in the Arts and Sciences'. I was also founder of a collaborative project between the Departments of Classics and Archaeology at Nottingham and the School of Ancient History and Archaeology at Leicester on the theme of 'Mediterranean Identities: Culture, History and Archaeology' (MICHA), the first conference of which was held in March 2010. I am also a member of the Nottingham Institute for Research in Visual Culture (NIRVC).

PhD Supervision

I am able to supervise research students in most areas of Republican or early imperial Roman social, cultural and political history, on Roman religion, as well as aspects of ancient perception, and certain themes within the reception of classical antiquity in modern European culture. I am currently supervising three research students: one on the Roman Republican censorship, one on trees in the history and culture of Roman Italy, and one (from September 2015) on the senses and the female body in ancient Rome. I have previously supervised four research students who completed their PhDs on 'Pollution in Roman religion' (awarded 2011), 'Roman female suicide' (awarded 2011), 'Approaches to healing in Roman Egypt' (awarded 2011) and 'Clothing and society in late antiquity' (awarded 2013).

Media and Outreach

I have made a number of appearances on television and radio. I appeared as academic consultant for the making of the 1960s Doctor Who: The Romans, released on DVD in 2009. I was also Lead Consultant for a BBC4 series on religion in the city of Rome from paganism to Christianity (Rome: a History of the Eternal City), presented by Simon Sebag Montefiore and aired in December 2012; the episode in which I was interviewed can be viewed here. I was also a consultant and talking head for a BBC1 documentary titled 'Rome's Invisible City', presented by Alexander Armstrong and Michael Scott, which was aired in June 2015. I have also appeared on Radio 4's 'Front Row' and ABC's 'The Body Sphere', talking about colour in the ancient world.

I am also extensively involved in Outreach and Knowledge Transfer activities. I have been responsible for designing online Activities in Classical Studies for the national Young, Gifted and Talented programme. These Activities, together with short movies and suggested responses, can be viewed on the YGT website. I was also Treasurer for the Nottingham Branch of the Classical Association from 2008 to 2012.

Teaching Summary

I am currently Director of Teaching for the Faculty of Arts: in this role I chair the Arts Faculty Teaching Board, sit on the University's Teaching and Learning Board, and oversee all aspects of… read more

Research Summary

Foul bodies in ancient Rome

This project sets out to understand how Romans of the early Empire formulated and mobilized disgust as a response to bodies that were perceived to be 'out of place' in civilized society. The study of emotions in the classical world has received some comprehensive scholarly attention in recent years, and classical scholars have in recent decades begun to recognise the pervasive significance of pollution in Greco-Roman religion, society and culture, but these two areas of scholarly research have normally been kept distinct. Twenty-first century scholarship in anthropology and sociology has positioned 'disgust' as a critical factor in the value judgments of human society and its organization of customs, laws and hierarchies. Furthermore, recent work - both in academic and popular circles - has scrutinized the relationship between dirt ('matter-out-of-place'), disgust (reactions to that dirt) and civilization, and has questioned how far disgust is a universally shared emotion driven by common human values, and how far it is influenced, shaped and regulated by culture. Since Mary Douglas, scholars in a range of disciplines have steered the study of pollution specifically on to the human body: it is there, in the blood, flesh and bodily excretions, that communities calibrate the language and imagery of dirt, whether it be criminal behaviour, a city in ruins, political corruption or perceived racial threats. This research project, then, unites all these various threads - emotions, pollution, religion, law and medicine - and examines a rich body of evidence from the literature, rhetoric and art of early imperial Rome to explore the classification and evaluation of foul bodies in contemporary society and culture: the monstrous bodies of Roman myth and fiction; consumptive bodies; deformed bodies; bodies used in obscene ways; criminals; and bodies that are aged, diseased or dead. It examines ancient medical discussions of the ideal and non-ideal body, approaches to hygiene and sanitation, and the use of the senses - eyes, noses, ears - to identify and evaluate foul bodies, as well as bodies that are foul by association (origin/ race, occupation, environment and community, behaviour). It also considers the integration of these various discourses within contemporary religious and political life. Finally, it examines the legacy of pagan bodies in the early Church from late antiquity through to Renaissance Italy, and in doing so considers the contribution made by ancient Rome and cultural memories of the pagan past to concepts of the deviant body in later western thought.

I have already published a substantial article on one aspect of this project: 'Obesity, corpulence and emaciation in Roman art', in Papers of the British School at Rome 79 (2011): 1-41, and I am currently writing an article on 'Roman noses', which examines representations of noses and approaches to smelling in ancient thought, literature and art.

Recent Publications

  • BRADLEY, M., ed., 2014. Smell and the Ancient Senses Routledge.
  • BRADLEY, M., 2014. Art and the senses: the artistry of bodies, stages and cities in the Greco-Roman world. In: A Cultural History of the Senses in Antiquity I. Bloomsbury. 183-208
  • BRADLEY, M., 2013. Pollution, Greece and Rome. In: BAGNALL, R. ET AL., ed., The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Ancient History Blackwell.
  • BRADLEY, M., 2013. Colors and color perception. In: BAGNALL, R. ET AL., ed., The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Ancient History Blackwell.

I am currently Director of Teaching for the Faculty of Arts: in this role I chair the Arts Faculty Teaching Board, sit on the University's Teaching and Learning Board, and oversee all aspects of teaching and learning for the School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies, the School of English and the School of Humanities. I am also (until January 2016), Director of Postgraduate Teaching (PGT) for the School of Humanities.

I have wide-ranging experience teaching in most areas of Classics, but I specialise in teaching the history, society and culture of the Roman world, with particular emphasis on the city of Rome. At undergraduate level I have convened and taught large modules on Religion and the Romans, Early Rome: Myth, History and Archaeology, The Fall of the Roman Republic and and I have also taught the first-year module ​Colour and Culture in the Mediterranean World, as well as Classics and Popular Culture. At MA level, I have taught aspects of Greek and Roman politics and empire and imperialism, the Ancient City, as well as a range of classes connected to my areas of research. I also teach Latin and Greek at all levels.

PhD Supervision

I have taught five research students on a range of topics (Roman female suicide; pollution in Roman religion; medicine and healing in Roman Egypt; the Roman Republican censorship; clothing in late-antique Roman society; Roman trees; and Roman senses and the female body). I am happy to discuss ideas and proposals with other potential research students.

Please note that I will be on research leave for Spring Semester 2015/16.

Future Research

Roman Noses: Smell and Smelling in Ancient Rome

Smell is a vapid, transient and elusive phenomenon. Because it is so difficult to document, describe and understand, and because - as thinkers from Aristotle to Alain Corbin have recognized - the sense of smell belongs more to the world of animals than civilised man, smell was not the subject of detailed research until the 1980s, and there remains no comprehensive study of olfaction in classical antiquity. This project will build on five years of research into the role of olfaction in Roman elite literature from the late Republic through to the advent of Christianity to complete the first comprehensive book-length study of smell in ancient Rome, and disseminate its findings to the public domain via schools, museum displays and the media. When and how did the Roman elite turn to smell to communicate information and values? What traces does it leave in the evidence available to us? And how did it relate to taste, touch, hearing and sight in the Roman sensorium?

  • BRADLEY, M., ed., 2014. Smell and the Ancient Senses Routledge.
  • BRADLEY, M., 2014. Art and the senses: the artistry of bodies, stages and cities in the Greco-Roman world. In: A Cultural History of the Senses in Antiquity I. Bloomsbury. 183-208
  • BRADLEY, M., 2013. Pollution, Greece and Rome. In: BAGNALL, R. ET AL., ed., The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Ancient History Blackwell.
  • BRADLEY, M., 2013. Colors and color perception. In: BAGNALL, R. ET AL., ed., The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Ancient History Blackwell.
  • BRADLEY, M., 2013. Purification, Rome. In: BAGNALL, R. ET AL., ed., The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Ancient History Blackwell.
  • BRADLEY, M., 2013. Colour as synaesthetic experience in antiquity. In: Synaesthesia and the Ancient Senses Acumen. 127-140
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2011. Obesity, corpulence and emaciation in Roman art Papers of the British School at Rome. 79, 1-41
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2010. Greed, grit, and grandeur: Roman civilization in the Victorian nursery Omnibus (London). 60, 27-30
  • BRADLEY, M., 2010. Tacitus' Agricola and the conquest of Britain: representations of empire in Victorian and Edwardian England. In: BRADLEY, M., ed., Classics and Imperialism in the British Empire Oxford University Press. 123-57
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2010. Colors/ Amber Cabinet Magazine. 39, 7-9
  • BRADLEY, M., 2010. Classics at Nottingham Journal of Classical Teachers. 19,
  • BRADLEY, M., ed., 2010. Classics and imperialism in the British Empire Oxford University Press.
  • BRADLEY, M., 2010. Introduction: Approaches to Classics and Imperialism. In: BRADLEY, M., ed., Classics and Imperialism in the British Empire Oxford University Press. 1-28
  • BRADLEY, M., 2009. Colour and meaning in Ancient Rome 1st ed. Cambridge University Press.
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2009. The importance of colour on ancient marble sculpture Art History. 32, 427-457
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2009. Review of Hardwick, L. & Gillsepie, C. (2007) (eds.) Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds (Oxford) Classical Review. 59(2), 613-15 (In Press.)
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2008. Review of K. Galinsky (2005, eds.) The Cambridge Companion to the age of Augustus European Review of History. 15(2), 207-209
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2007. Review of J. Porter (2006, ed.) Classical pasts: the classical traditions of Greece and Rome Journal of Hellenic Studies. 127, (In Press.)
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2007. Review of A. Rouveret, S. Dubel & V. Naas (2006, eds.) Couleurs et matieres dans l'antiquite: textes, techniques et pratiques Classical Review. 57, (In Press.)
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2006. Colour and marble in early imperial Rome Cambridge Classical Journal. 52, 1-22
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2006. Review of L. Villard (2002, ed.) Couleurs et vision dans l'antiquite classique Bryn Mawr Classical Review. 08 47,
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2006. Thinking with dirt: Roman sewers and the politics of cleanliness. Omnibus (London). 51, 3-5
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2006. Review of B. Goff (2005, ed.) Classics and Colonialism Journal of Roman Studies. 96, 213-214
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2004. The colour "blush" in ancient Rome. In: CLELAND, L. and STEARS, K., eds., Colour in the ancient Mediterranean world Oxford : Hedges. 117-21
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2002. It all comes out in the wash: looking harder at the Roman fullonica Journal of Roman Archaeology. 15(Fascicule 1), 20-44
  • BRADLEY, M.A., 2002. Fool's gold: Colour, culture, innovation and madness in Nero's Golden House Apollo. VOL 156(ISSU 485), 35-44

Department of Classics

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

Contact details