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Matthew Duncombe

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

I'm currently an Assistant Professor in Philosophy. Between 2014 and 2016 I was a Post Doctoral Fellow in Classics at Durham University and from 2012 to 2014 I was a post-doc in philosophy at the University of Groningen. The University of Cambridge awarded my PhD in 2012.

Drop In Hours: Monday and Friday, 15.30-16.30, University Park Campus, Humanities Building, Room C06

Expertise Summary

Ancient Philosophy; Ancient Logic.

Research Summary

My British Academy project, entitled 'Relativity in Ancient Philosophy' asks at what it is for things to relate to each other. What is it to be larger or smaller, for example? In particular, I'm… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

My British Academy project, entitled 'Relativity in Ancient Philosophy' asks at what it is for things to relate to each other. What is it to be larger or smaller, for example? In particular, I'm looking at ancient views of relativity and how underlying assumptions about relativity affected ancient philosophy. I articulate Plato's ideas about relatives and follow how Aristotle, the Stoics and Sceptics develop these ideas, given their own agendas. I also argue that ancient thinking can help us get clear the phenomenon of relativity more generally.

Past Research

My work in Groningen looked at dialectic in Aristotle's logic as part of a project on the Roots of Deduction.

Future Research

I'm developing a number of projects centered on ancient logic and argument. One project, which I refer to as 'use and abuse of ancient logic' looks at what ancient philosophers thought logic was for and how this might explain the otherwise odd formal features of logic. Is logic a tool for reasoning well? Is it a tool for arguing well? Does logic track structural features of reality? What sort of agent is a good logician? Another project, on infinite regress arguments in philosophy, looks at this well known argument form, and asks whether these are good arguments and, if so, under what conditions.

Department of Philosophy

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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