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Holly Miller

Research Fellow. Dama International Project, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

Since November 2012: Research Fellow, Dama International, University of Nottingham

January 2012 - October 2012: Post-doctoral Research Assistant, Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolution, University of Cambridge

Expertise Summary

Lithic (chipped stone) analysis; stable isotope analysis of zooarchaeological material; prehistory of the Near East; origins of nomadic pastoralism in the Southern Levant; material culture of the Near East; the development of lithic technologies, beads and personal adornment, bead technology

Research Summary

I am currently working on an AHRC-funded project entitled "Dama International: Fallow Deer and European Society". My role on this project is to use stable isotope analysis in order to look at… read more

Current Research

I am currently working on an AHRC-funded project entitled "Dama International: Fallow Deer and European Society". My role on this project is to use stable isotope analysis in order to look at potential sources of evidence for movement, management practices, changing environmental circumstances, etc.

This research forms part of a larger, multi disciplinary, project that brings together wider archaeological, historical, scientific and anthropological sources of evidence. The successful story of fallow introductions can provide important insights into human population movements, trade and ideology with the potential to provide cultural evidence of the highest quality and relevance for a range of disciplines and audiences.

http://www.fallow-deer-project.net

Follow the fallow deer project on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DeerProject

Past Research

Prior to becoming a member of the team on the fallow deer project, my PhD research, undertaken at the University of Liverpool, focused on similar assessments of human-animal-landscape relationships - dietary and environmental change, developing human-animal relationships, early animal management practices, movement patterns and associated societal change- applied to the origins of nomadic pastoralism in the steppe and desert of the Southern Levant.

Department of Archaeology

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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