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Reinhard Stöger

Associate Professor in Epigenetics, Faculty of Science

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Biography

Dr Reinhard Stöger

Associate Professor in Epigenetics

Reinhard's research interests encompass epigenetic mechanisms of nucleic acid modifications, chromatin, non-coding RNAs, epigenetic inheritance, gene-environment interactions and energy metabolism. Current research projects include:

  • Analysing the impact of environmental stressors on honeybee health, combining transcriptomics, metabolomics, and systems biology.
  • Epigenetic regulation of Leptin, encoding a key metabolic hormone.
  • Mitochondrial DNA metabolism.

Teaching Summary

Teaching in courses that cover the following topics: epigenetics, developmental biology, respiration, cell signalling, cell cycle, growth factors, endocrinology, evolutionary adaptations.

Research Summary

Research concentrates on identification and characterisation of genomic loci that are responsive to environmental stressors and stimuli such as under/overnutrition, synthetic compounds and hormones.… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

Research concentrates on identification and characterisation of genomic loci that are responsive to environmental stressors and stimuli such as under/overnutrition, synthetic compounds and hormones. Do the epigenetic marks change? How persistent are this epigenetic changes?

Reinhard heads an international team that recently reported subtle but distinct changes in expression of metabolic genes and lipid composition in honeybee larvae upon exposure to low levels of an insecticide.

The Leptin gene has unusual DNA modification patterns. How are these epigenetic marks established and how do they modulate the expression of this important metabolic hormone?

Research is also underway to explore DNA metabolism of the mitochondrial genome in response to developmental and environmental stimuli.

Past Research

Reinhard Stöger has long-standing experience and research interest in epigenetic phenomena.

He worked with Denise Barlow at the IMP/Vienna (Austria), to discover and describe an imprinted gene in mammals.

Reinhard worked in London and Seattle, focusing largely on epigenetic mechanisms in human syndromes and diseases. Reinhard identified a new subfamily of chromodomain helicases, contributed to the conception and development of new methods and research tools.

He advanced a hypothesis that provides an explanation for the difficulty of identifying allelic variations associated with non-syndromic obesity and type 2 diabetes.

School of Biosciences

Sutton Bonington
Campus
Nr Loughborough, LE12 5RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 9516400
fax: +44 (0) 115 9516020
email: biosciences-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk

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