School of Biosciences
  • Print
   
   
 

Image of Tim Robbins

Tim Robbins

Associate Professor in Plant Genetics, Faculty of Science

Contact

Teaching Summary

Most of my teaching is at MSc level and I manage the Plant-route of the new MSc course in Biotechnology.

I co-convene a 20 credit module D24BA1 "Advanced Molecular Techniques in Biotechnology"

I convene a 20 credit module D24BA8 "Plant Biotechnology MSc Pre-project"

I also teach on a range of BSc and MSc modules

Research Summary

The main area of research in my group is gametophytic self-incompatibility with a ribonuclease-based mechanism. This is one of the most widely distributed genetic mechanisms that prevents self… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

The main area of research in my group is gametophytic self-incompatibility with a ribonuclease-based mechanism. This is one of the most widely distributed genetic mechanisms that prevents self fertilization in angiosperms. Self pollen is rejected following a highly specific recognition between pollen and pistil. We study self-incompatibility in members of the Solanaceae (Petunia and Solanum) and Rosaceae (Prunus and Pyrus).

Self-incompatibility in the Solanaceae My research in the Solanaceae has involved using the model system of Petunia. The S-RNase has been cloned for three functional S-alleles. As part of a collaboration with the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Beijing) an F-box candidate for the pollen-S gene was identified (Qiao et al, 2004). Most cultivars of Petunia hybrida are self-compatible and we are also studying the molecular basis of self-compatibility which is associated with a particular S-RNase (So). A more recent area of research in the Solanaceae is a collaboration with Dr Glenn Bryan at the James Hutton Institute, Dundee on the allelic diversity of S-RNases in wild species of Solanum. This work was recently published (Dzidzienyo et al, 2016).

Self-incompatibility in the Rosaceae In collaborative projects with Ken Tobutt and colleagues at East Malling we have sequenced a wide range of S-RNases to study S-allele diversity in the genus Prunus. The study of a two self-compatible mutants in sweet cherry (Prunus avium) provided evidence confiming the role of S-linked F-box genes in self-incompatibility in the Rosaceae (Sonneveld et al, 2005). I have also collaborated with Dr Javier Sanzol and colleagues at CITA Zaragosa studying S-RNase diversity in the European pear (Pyrus communis).

School of Biosciences

University of Nottingham
Sutton Bonington Campus
Nr Loughborough
LE12 5RD, UK

For all enquiries please visit:
www.nottingham.ac.uk/enquire

Find us
Campus map
Room Locations on Campus