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Image of Katharina Lorenz

Katharina Lorenz

Associate Professor in Classical Studies; Director, Digital Humanities Centre, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

Before coming to Nottingham in 2005 I studied Classical Archaeology, Ancient History and Greek at Berlin, Oxford and Heidelberg. During my doctoral studies I worked in a research group concerned with urban culture in imperial Rome at the German Archaeological Institute in Rome. After graduating with a Dr. phil. from Heidelberg, I was associate member of the research group Image - Body - Media at the Institute for Visual Media in the Centre for Art and Media in Karlsruhe and lecturer in Classical Archaeology at Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen.

In 2014 I received a Vice-Chancellor Achievement Award for my work in Digital Humanities.

Please note that I will not be available for undergraduate/postgraduate teaching at the department until Autumn 2017/18 (doctoral supervision will continue as normal): in Autumn 2015/16 I am on secondment as Visiting Professor at Humboldt-Universität Berlin; from April 2016 I will take up a 12-month research fellowship at the Morphomata Centre of Advanced Study at the University of Cologne; I will be on research leave in Spring 2016/17.

Expertise Summary

  • Classical archaeology and ancient art history of the Greek and Roman world
  • Historiography of art history and classical archaeology
  • Digital Humanities

Teaching Summary

In 2014/15, I taught a variety of courses on Greek and Roman art at UG and PG level (all content was directly informed by my research, and there was plenty of opportunity for students to get hands-on… read more

Research Summary

My work ranges across the fields of Greek and Roman art and archaeology: Greek and Roman painting, sculpture (esp. portraiture) and visual/spatial narrative. I am especially interested in the… read more

In 2014/15, I taught a variety of courses on Greek and Roman art at UG and PG level (all content was directly informed by my research, and there was plenty of opportunity for students to get hands-on research experience): Q81ART Interpreting Ancient Art; Q83VIS Visual Mythology; Q83AFC Ancient Faces: Greek and Roman Portraiture; Q82SCS Studying Classical Scholarship. I also ran a professional development module at MA level, teaching students across the Arts Faculty important skills in dealing with digital technologies: Q84DLT Digital Literacies for the Heritage Sector.

I am part of Q-Kolleg, a teaching collaboration with the Winckelmann Institut, Humboldt University Berlin, fostering international research collaboration between our students. Here you can find a report from a recent visit of the Humboldt students to Nottingham.

In 2012/13 I led the object strand in the AHRC-funded postgraduate research skills training program Hidden Collections: the team I mentored created a blog for the 2013 Nottingham exhibition of the Nemi collection: "In Fundilias Footsteps".

In my role as the Director of the Digital Humanities Centre (DHC), I am particularly interested in the use of presentation technologies in learning and in classroom teaching ( for some of my recent research in this area, see: The Rhetoric of Multi-Display Learning Spaces), and in mentoring our students to improve their digital literacy. Together with Matt Davies, the Manager of the DHC, I also mentor a large team of undergraduate student volunteers working for the DHC (from digitisation technologies to social media marketing and business engagement); some of them use the work experience in the DHC to fulfill the requirements for the Nottingham Advantage Award.

I currently supervise three PhD theses, on Dionysian sarcophagi (Leveritt), on audience experiences in gallery contexts (Fosh), on religious experience in Archaic sanctuaries (Round); and an MPhil thesis on depictions of Bellerophon on Roman mosaics (Barton).

I would be interested in supervising research in the area of Greek and Roman art and visual culture, and especially on Greek and Roman painting, mythological images and the meanings of style.

If you want to listen to some of my teaching material:

Vodcast: On teaching critical skills

Vodcast: What's the point of studying Pompeian painting?

Open University Course: Myth in the Greek and Roman Worlds

Current Research

My work ranges across the fields of Greek and Roman art and archaeology: Greek and Roman painting, sculpture (esp. portraiture) and visual/spatial narrative. I am especially interested in the methodologies for the study of Classical art and their implications for historical understanding. I am a member of the AHRC Peer Review College and on the editorial board for De Gruyter's series URBS and Ashgate's series Image, Text and Culture in Classical Antiquity.

In Autumn 2015/16 I am on secondment as Visiting Professor at Humboldt-Universität Berlin; from April 2016 I will take up a 12-month fellowship at the Morphomata Centre of Advanced Study at the University of Cologne. During this period, I will work on my new monograph project, Identity and Likeness in Roman portraiture.

Arts & Technology

I am the Director of the Digital Humanities Centre, funded by the Capital Investment Fund and located in the School of Humanities. I co-lead, with Ben Bedwell, the University's Research Priority Area "Heritage and the Digital". I am Co-I on the UNUK-funded Discipline Bridging Award project Digital Humanities and Arts Praxis.

In 2014 I received a Vice-Chancellor Achievement Award for my work in Digital Humanities.

Nemi

Since coming to Nottingham in 2005 I have been involved in research on the Roman Sanctuary of Diana at Nemi in Italy. The Nottingham Castle Museum and Galleries curate the largest collection of archaeological finds from the site. In collaboration with the museum I led a project on the virtual display of these artefacts (www.speculum-dianae.nottingham.ac.uk). In Summer 2013, the Castle hosted a major exhibition dedicated to the Nemi collection. In February 2014, I ran an international conference to underpin further collaborative work on the site, along with the production of a new catalogue for the Nottingham collection.

Supported by a CAS Research Development grant, I was also able to begin work on a related project, studying the Roman portraits from Nemi by means of 3D scanning technology. For this work, I am collaborating with computer scientists and forensic anthropologists in the US, and with the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen. Here you can find our first publication on the the topic. This work underpins my current book project, Identity and Likeness in Roman portraiture.

For a list of presentations, past and future, see here.

If you want to listen to me:

Open University Course: Myth in the Greek and Roman Worlds

Vodcast: What's the point of studying Pompeian painting?

Past Research

  • Mythological Images and their Interpretation: Iconology, Semiotics and Image Studies in Ancient Art History. Cambridge University Press (submitted).
  • I was the Principal Investigator on the AHRC Digital Transformations International Network Data - Asset - Method. Harnessing the Infinite Archive, working with the co-investigator Steve Benford in Computer Science, the Horizon Digital Economy Research Institute and colleagues across the Arts Faculty. Together with other university partners in the UK and US, and with cultural institutions and industry partners in the UK, we explored the shaping of digital archives and in turn, technology and knowledge.
  • Bilder machen Räume. Mythenbilder in pompeianischen Häusern (Berlin, 2008).
  • Iconotexts. The relationship of text and image in the ancient world (access to the online documentation of the conference Ikonot exte. Duale Mediensituationen. Giessen, February 16-19, 2006).

Department of Classics

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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