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Discussion Papers

Featured discussion papers

NICEP 17/01: Race, Representation and Policy: Black Elected Officials and Public Spending in the US South

Description
In this paper Andrea Bernini, Giovanni Facchini and Cecilia Testa provide the first systematic assessment on the effect of the Voting Right Act on the racial make-up of US local governments between 1964 and 1980, providing causal evidence that it increased black representation in important elective bodies, for example, county commissions, with extensive policy making power.
Date:
October 2017

NICEP 17/02: The First and Last Word in Debates: Plaintive Plaintiffs

Description
Elena D'Agostino and Daniel J. Seidmann discuss whether it is better to have the first or the last word in debates.
Date:
October 2017

CFCM 17/06: Does rental housing market stabilize the economy? A micro and macro perspective.

CFCM 17/06: Does rental housing market stabilize the economy? A micro and macro perspective.
Description
In this paper, Michal Rubaszek and Margarita Rubio conduct an original survey among a representative group of 1005 Poles to dig into the causes of rental market underdevelopment and design appropriate policy recommendations.
Date:
August 2017

GEP 17/10: Globalisation and state capitalism: Assessing Vietnam's accession to the WTO

Description
In this paper Leonardo Baccini, Giammario Impullitti and Edmund J. Malesky assess the productivity gains from trade in an economy with a substantial presence of State-Owned Enterprises.
Date:
August 2017

CFCM 17/04: Customer financing, bargaining power and trade credit uptake

Description
Simona Mateut and Thanaset Chevapatrakul examine whether the relative roles played by the financing and the bargaining power motives vary depending on the amount of trade credit taken by firms.
Date:
July 2017

GC 17/03: Forecast evaluation tests and negative long-run variance estimates in small samples

GC 17/03: Forecast evaluation tests and negative long-run variance estimates in small samples
Description
David Harvey, Steve Leybourne and Emily Whitehouse show that in small, but empirically relevant, sample sizes, the long-run variance estimate used to compute the Diebold-Mariano test for forecast accuracy can frequently be negative. The authors consider a number of alternative approaches to estimating the long-run variance, and examine the finite sample performance of tests that use these differing approaches.
Date:
June 2017

CeDEx 2017-10: Social comparisons in job search: experimental evidence

Description
Jingcheng Fu, Martin Sefton and Richard Upward use a laboratory experiment to investigate how social comparisons affect job-seekers' behaviour.
Date:
June 2017

CeDEx 2017-07: Disappointment Aversion and Social Comparisons in a Real-Effort Competition

CeDEx 2017-07: Disappointment Aversion and Social Comparisons in a Real-Effort Competition
Description
Simon Gächter, Lingbo Huang and Martin Sefton investigate the contribution of social comparison effects to the disappointment aversion previously identified in a two-person real-effort competition.
Date:
May 2017

CREDIT 17/03 The economic impact of political instability and mass civil protest

CREDIT 17/03 The economic impact of political instability and mass civil protest
Description
Samer Matta, Simon Appleton and Michael Bleaney use synthetic control methodology, which constructs a counterfactual in the absence of political instability, to estimate the output effect of 38 regime crises in the period 1970-2011.
Date:
April 2017

CeDEx 2017-05: Nudging the electorate: what works and why?

CeDEx 2017-05: Nudging the electorate: what works and why?
Description
Felix Kölle, Tom Lane, Daniele Nosenzo and Chris Starmer investigate how citizens can be nudged to register to vote in elections, and why some nudges work better than others.
Date:
April 2017
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