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Featured Publications

The impact of trade agreementsThe impact of trade agreements on consumer welfare

In this publication in the Journal of the European Economic Association, Giuseppe Berlingieri, Holger Breinlich and Swati Dhingra estimate the impact of the European Union’s trade agreements on consumer prices.
 

Firm dynamicsFirm dynamics and residual inequality in open economies

In this publication in the Journal of the European Economic Association, Gabriel Felbermayr, Giammario Impullitti and Julien Prat study the implications of labor and product market reforms on wage inequality in an open economy model with search frictions and firm heterogeneity.
 

Conditional cooperation and betrayal aversionConditional cooperation and betrayal aversion

In this publication in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Robin Cubitt, Simon Gächter and Simone Quercia use a laboratory experiment to investigate whether there is a link between two phenomena that have attracted the attention of behavioural economists and psychologists: conditional willingness to cooperate in social dilemmas and particular aversion to risks that arise from the possibility of intentional exploitation by other human agents.
 

Global imbalances revisitedGlobal imbalances revisited: The transfer problem and transport costs in monopolistic competition

In this recent publication in the Journal of International Economics, Paolo Epifani and Gino Gancia study the welfare effects of trade imbalances in a two-sector model of monopolistic competition and show that unlike the conventional wisdom trade imbalances do not impose any double burden on surplus countries.
 

The sustainability of empire in a global perspectiveThe sustainability of empire in a global perspective: the role of international trade patterns

In this recent publication in the Journal of International Economics, Roberto Bonfatti argues that large changes in trade patterns may lead to a change in the shape of empires, through secession. In particular, if the world outside of the empire switches from being a trade competitor of the colony to being less of a trade competitor, or a trade partner, the colony becomes more likely to secede.
 

The importance of peers for compliance with norms of fair sharingThe importance of peers for compliance with norms of fair sharing

In this publication in the European Economic Review, Simon Gächter, Leonie Gerhards, and Daniele Nosenzo show, using a large-scale dictator game experiment (N = 850), that “peers” can have a profound influence on individuals’ perceptions of norms of fair sharing, but find limited evidence of the influence of norms and peers on actual sharing behaviour.
 

Trust and technology transfersTrust and technology transfers

In this publication in the Journal of Economic Behaviour and Organization, Maria Garcia-Vega and Elena Huergo empirically investigate how widely held perceptions of the trustworthiness of the host economy influence international technology transfers that subsidiaries receive from their business group or from other international providers.
 

Growth, Import Dependence and WarGrowth, import dependence and war

In this publication, forthcoming in the Economic Journal, Roberto Bonfatti and Kevin O'Rourke argue that industrialisation may lead an emerging industrial nation to trigger war either against a resource-rich country or the incumbent nation. The model can help explain the US-Japanese conflict of 1941 and Hitler's invasion of Poland, and has implications for US-Chinese relations today.
 

Growth and inequality in public good provisionGrowth and inequality in public good provision

In this publication in the Journal of Public Economics, Simon Gaechter, Friederike Mengel, Elias Tsakas, and Alexander Vostroknutov report the results of experimental 'public good' games in which participants choose how to divide their resources between two investment options in each of either 10 or 15 rounds of the game. The first is a private option with a smaller but predictable return, while the second has a larger return to be divided equally among all of the players regardless of contribution. Some of the games gave the option for players to penalise other players at a cost to themselves too.
 

The Research Reproducibility Crisis and Economics of ScienceThe research reproducibility crisis and economics of science

In this forthcoming publication in the Economic Journal, Zacharias Maniadis and Fabio Tufano offer an overview of the current state of play on the crisis of research reproducibility and the consequent twofold opportunity for cross-fertilization between economics and other empirical disciplines.
 

Exploring Reproducibility in EconomicsTo replicate or not to replicate? Exploring reproducibility in economics

In this forthcoming publication in the Economic Journal, Zacharias Maniadis, Fabio Tufano and John A. List employ both theory and empirical evidence to discuss the import of replication for improving confidence in novel research findings in (empirical) economics.
 

Generalised mean-risk preferencesGeneralised mean-risk preferences

In this paper, published in the Journal of Economic Theory, Daniel Schoch (School of Economics, Malaysia Campus) axiomatises mean-risk preferences for a larger class of deviation measures. The first result extends Grechuk’s case when the decision maker has mean-risk preferences with some unknown deviation risk measure. The second and major result covers the case when the deviation measure is given. This generalises Löffler’s result to a broad class of risk measures.
 

Subsidies with export share requirements in ChinaSubsidies with export share requirements in China

In this publication, published in the Journal of Development Economics, Fabrice Defever and Alejandro Riaño study the effect of subsidies subject to export share requirements, that is, conditioned on a firm exporting at least a given fraction of its output. They show that this type of subsidy boosts exports more and provides greater protection for domestic firms than a standard unconditional export subsidy, albeit at a substantial welfare cost.
 

Is poor financial literacy a barrier to home ownership?Is poor financial literacy a barrier to home ownership?

In this publication, published in the Journal of Urban Economics, John Gathergood and Joerg Weber use survey data from British households to measure financial literacy. They found that financial literacy with respect to understanding mortgages is generally low in the population, and lower still among renters. Financial literacy predicts home ownership for young homeowners, and young people with poor financial literacy are more likely to take on larger debts and use alternative mortgage products.
 

From mine to coastFrom mine to coast: Transport infrastructure and the direction of trade in developing countries

In this publication in the Journal of Development Economics, Roberto Bonfatti and Steven Poelhekke find that the infrastructure developed to connect mines to the coast also lowers the cost of trading other goods with overseas countries compared to trading overland with neighbouring countries. Their findings have important implications for optimal investment in Africa's transport infrastructure, particularly at a time in which Chinese investments seem to be re-inforcing Africa's interior-to-coast networks.
 

 

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