Human Rights Law Centre
   
   
  

Nottingham Studies on Human Rights

The Nottingham Studies on Human Rights is a series edited within HRLC by Professor David Harris and Professor Dominic McGoldrick. It comprises a collection of monographs and edited volumes offering scholarly analysis and discussion of the theory and practice of international and national human rights law. The series covers all categories of human rights and the machinery for their implementation. It extends to the human rights standards developed within the United Nations and within regional human rights organisations. Particular attention is given to how these standards are applied and implemented in practice, as well as to issues of current concern and debate.

All volumes in the series are available on the Brill website.

Volume 1: Human Rights Diplomacy: Contemporary Perspectives

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Human Rights Diplomacy: Contemporary Perspectives, edited by Professor Michael O'Flaherty, Dr George Ulrich, Dr Amrei Mueller and Professor Zdzislaw Kedzia (Brill Academic Publications, 2011) is the first volume in the newly established series Nottingham Studies on Human Rights with Martinus Nijhoff Publications.

The first volume is a collection of essays that explore the notion, tools and challenges of human rights diplomacy, which is understood as the utilisation of diplomatic negotiation and persuasion for the specific purpose of promoting and protecting human rights. Theoretical reflections are combined with first-hand accounts from a wide range of policy-makers involved in human rights diplomacy at the bilateral, regional and multilateral (UN) level.

Contributors include inter-governmentally appointed office-holders, human rights ambassadors, members of UN human rights treaty bodies and representatives of inter-governmental organisations, national human rights institutions and non-governmental organisations. Their analysis shows that skilful and principled diplomacy can become a crucial part of a holistic approach to human rights protection, complementing other means such as legal remedies, public advocacy, political pressure and technical assistance. This book builds on discussions at a high-level workshop on the topic, organised by the HRLC, the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation and the Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań in January 2009.

 

 

Volume 2: The Relationship between Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and International Humanitarian Law 

The Relationship between Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and International Humanitarian Law offers a detailed analysis of the legal consequences of the parallel application of economic, social and cutural rights and international humanitarian law to non-international armed conflicts.

The volume focuses on health-related issues covering topics such as the scope of limitations to and derogations from economic, social and cultural rights;  the right to health in military-targeted states; states' obligations to mitigate the adverse public health impact of armed conflicts and to provide humanitarian assistance.

Not only does the discussion of the parallel application of economic, social and cultural rights and international humanitarian law emphasise the potential to enhance the protection of people affected by armed conflicts, but it also highlights the difficulties involved.

The book, authored by Dr Amrei Mueller and edited by Professor Harris and Professor O'Flaherty (Brill Academic Publications, 2013), is the second volume of the Nottingham Studies on Human Rights, published by Martinus Nijhoff Publications.

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Volume 3: The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights: Conscience for the World  

V3-Nottingham-Human-Rights-Series 

The third volume of the Nottingham Studies on Human Rights considers the role of the top United Nations Human Rights official. The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights: Conscience for the World, edited by Felice Gaer and Christen Broecker, is an analysis of the achievements, leadership styles and obstacles encountered by the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, and makes recommendations for the future.

A total of 18 expert contributors including present and former UN policymakers, human rights practitioners, legal scholars, and current High Commissioner Navi Pillay examine how UN High Commissioners past and present have worked to end atrocities, hold to account perpetrators of abuses, to promote equality and justice, and provide protection and redress to victims.

 

 

Volume 4: Cooperation and the International Criminal Court: Perspectives from Theory and Practice

The fourth volume of the Nottingham Studies on Human Rights, Cooperation and the International Criminal Court – Perspectives from Theory and Practice, provides a unique insight into the current status of cooperation as well as future challenges for the ICC. 

As the International Criminal Court (ICC) does not possess its own enforcement mechanism, its ability to function is heavily dependent on cooperation. The volume provides a detailed analysis of the ICC cooperation regime by scholars and practitioners in international criminal law. Chapters focus on the law and practice of state cooperation, the role of civil society and regional organisations, asset recovery for the purpose of reparations, policy issues and how technology-driven tools can strengthen the ICC cooperation regime in practice. 

The volume is the outcome of an expert workshop  HRLC convened in September 2013. It was edited by the Head of HRLC’s International Criminal Justice Unit, Professor Olympia Bekou , and former HRLC Research Assistant Daley Birkett.

Volume 4, NSHR
 

 

Volume 5: Towards Convergence in International Human Rights Law - Approaches of Regional and International Systems

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The fifth volume of the Nottingham Studies on Human Rights, Towards Convergence in International Human Rights Law - Approaches of Regional and International Systems, explores the opportunities and challenges posed by the co-existence of multiple regional and international human rights bodies.

For some, normative pluralism within human rights is inevitable, and even desirable. Others view it as a threat to the integrity and coherence of international human rights protection. Topics within the volume are divided in three parts: i) rights, ii) themes, and iii) systems. Chapters look at the dialogue between international and regional bodies and address questions as to desirability, challenges and benefits of harmonising the two.

The volume was co-edited by Ms Carla Buckley, HRLC Research Fellow, Dr Alice Donald and Professor Philip Leach, Middlesex University, and is the outcome of a two-day expert workshop hosted by HRLC in June 2013. The workshop convened 25 leading experts in international human rights adjudications, including practitioners and academics. Serving and former judges, members and staff of the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights and the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and Inter-American Court of Human Rights, the European Court Human Rights and United Nations human rights treaty bodies, as well as leading UK and European academics in the area were represented.

 

 

Volume 6: The United Nations Special Procedure System 

The sixth volume of the Nottingham Studies on Human Rights, The United Nations Special Procedures System, explores the 'state of play' of the system.

The United Nations Special Procedures system is a key element of the evolving international framework for human rights protection and promotion. However, despite the system’s expansion, the range of roles and functions performed by mandate holders, and the mounting evidence of its strengths and limitations, there has been very little academic interrogation or analysis of Special Procedures. This lacuna is ever-more problematic given the growing profile and effectiveness of the Special Procedures’ work, as well as the increasing attention and challenges that they face, both externally from States and internally from within the UN system. 

The volume was co-edited by Professor Aoife Nolan, Head of HRLC's Economic and Social Rights Unit, Professor Rosa Freedman, University of Reading, and Professor Thérèse Murphy, Queen's University Belfast, and is the outcome of a two-day expert workshop hosted by HRLC in November 2014.

 

 UN Special Procedures Book

 

 

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