Bright spots shine light on the future of endangered coral reefs

   
   
Coral-Reef-PR
16 Jun 2016 12:34:48.033

PA142/16

Researchers have discovered a handful of ‘bright spots’ among the world’s embattled coral reefs, offering the promise of a radical new approach to conservation. 

Fish ecologist Dr David Feary from The University of Nottingham took part in one of the largest global studies of its kind, which conducted over 6,000 reef surveys in 46 countries across the globe, and discovered 15 ‘bright spots’ – places where, against all the odds, there were a lot more fish on coral reefs than expected. 

Dr Feary said: “Our study gives hope for new approaches to sustain coral reefs and the millions of people who depend on them. Uncovering the mechanisms that have enabled coral ‘bright spots’ to confound socioeconomic and environmental pressures will be the next challenge we face.” 

Click here for full story
 

Lead author Professor Josh Cinner from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University said: “Given the widespread depletion of coral reef fisheries globally, we were really excited to find these bright spots that were fairing much better than we anticipated. 

“These ‘bright spots’ are reefs with more fish than expected based on their exposure to pressures like human population, poverty, and unfavorable environmental conditions. 

“To be clear, bright spots are not necessarily pristine reefs, but rather reefs that have more fish than they should, given the pressures they face. 

“We wanted to know why these reefs could ‘punch above their weight’ so-to-speak, and whether there are lessons we can learn about how to avoid the degradation often associated with overfishing.” 

Co-author, Professor Nick Graham of Lancaster University says globally, coral reefs are in decline and current strategies for preserving them are insufficient. 

“Our bright spots approach has identified places we did not previously know were so successful, and the really interesting thing is that they are not necessarily untouched by man,” he says. 

“We believe their discovery offers the potential to develop exciting new solutions for coral reef conservation.” 

“Importantly, the bright spots had a few things in common, which, if applied to other places, might help promote better reef conditions.” 

“Many bright spots had strong local involvement in how the reefs were managed, local ownership rights, and traditional management practices,” says co-author Dr. Christina Hicks of Lancaster and Stanford Universities. 

The scientists also identified 35 ‘dark spots’ - these were reefs with fish stocks in worse shape than expected. 

“Dark spots also had a few defining characteristics; they were subject to intensive netting activities and there was easy access to freezers so people could stockpile fish to send to the market,” says Dr. Hicks.

This type of bright spots analysis has been used in fields such as human health to improve the wellbeing of millions of people. It is the first time it has been rigorously developed for conservation. 

“We believe that the bright spots offer hope and some solutions that can be applied more broadly across the world’s coral reefs,” says Prof. Cinner. 

“Specifically, investments that foster local involvement and provide people with ownership rights can allow people to develop creative solutions that help defy expectations of reef fisheries depletion. 

“Conversely, dark spots may highlight development or management pathways to avoid.” 

Bright spots were typically found in the Pacific Ocean in places like the Solomon Islands, parts of Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and Kiribati. Dark spots were more globally distributed and found in every major ocean basin. 

The study has been published in the journal Nature. Thirty nine scientists from 34 different universities and conservation groups conducted the research. 

Paper: (http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature18607)

— Ends —

Our academics can now be interviewed for broadcast via our Media Hub, which offers a Globelynx fixed camera and ISDN line facilities at University Park campus. For further information please contact a member of the Communications team on +44 (0)115 951 5798, email mediahub@nottingham.ac.uk or see the Globelynx website for how to register for this service.

For up to the minute media alerts, follow us on Twitter

Notes to editors: The University of Nottingham has 43,000 students and is ‘the nearest Britain has to a truly global university, with a “distinct” approach to internationalisation, which rests on those full-scale campuses in China and Malaysia, as well as a large presence in its home city.’ (Times Good University Guide 2016). It is also one of the most popular universities in the UK among graduate employers and was named University of the Year for Graduate Employment in the 2017 The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide. It is ranked in the world’s top 75 by the QS World University Rankings 2015/16, and 8th in the UK for research power according to the Research Excellence Framework 2014. It has been voted the world’s greenest campus for four years running, according to Greenmetrics Ranking of World Universities.

Impact: The Nottingham Campaign, its biggest-ever fundraising campaign, is delivering the University’s vision to change lives, tackle global issues and shape the future. More news…

 

Story credits

More information is available from Dr David Feary in the School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham on +44 (0)115 828 3051, david.feary@nottingham.ac.uk 
EmmaRayner2

Emma Rayner - Media Relations Manager

Email: emma.rayner@nottingham.ac.uk Phone: +44 (0)115 951 5793 Location: University Park

Additional resources

No additional resources for this article

Media Relations - External Relations

The University of Nottingham
C Floor, Pope Building (Room C4)
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 951 5798
email: communications@nottingham.ac.uk