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Andrew Mumford

Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, Faculty of Social Sciences

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Biography

Dr Andrew Mumford is a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations. His primary area of research is state responses to sub-state violence. His recent book The Counter-Insurgency Myth: The British Experience of Irregular War (Routledge, 2011) offers a macro-level history of the evolution of British responses to asymmetric insurgent threats. Andrew has published journal articles on a range of issues that explore how the British state in particular has attempted to deal with insurgencies, including torture, negotiations and reliance on air power. His latest book is Proxy Warfare, published by Polity in spring 2013.

Andrew gained his PhD from the University of Warwick in International Relations. He has been a Research Fellow at the International Centre for the Study of Terrorism at Pennsylvania State University, and has previously taught at the Universities of Sheffield and Hull. He is an Associate Editor of Political Studies. He will be a Visiting Fellow at the Eccles Centre for American Studies at the British Library in London during the 2012-13 academic year.

Expertise Summary

Dr Andrew Mumford's primary area of research is state responses to sub-state violence. His recent book The Counter-Insurgency Myth: The British Experience of Irregular War (Routledge, 2011) offers a macro-level history of the evolution of British responses to asymmetric insurgent threats. He is also co-editor of International Law, Security and Ethics: Policy Challenges in the Post-9/11 World (Routledge, 2011) and The Theory and Practice of Irregular Warfare: Warrior-Scholarship in Counterinsurgency. Andrew has published journal articles on a range of issues that explore how the British state in particular has attempted to deal with insurgencies, including torture, negotiations and reliance on air power. He has just published his latest book, Proxy Warfare, deconstructing the phenomena of indirect conflict intervention (Polity, 2013).

Teaching Summary

Andrew teaches modules across the International Relations and Security Studies spectrum.

Level 3: The War in Iraq (M13193)

Postgraduate: Contemporary Warfare (M14140/1) and Terrorism and Insurgencies (M14001/51)

Research Summary

Andrew Mumford's primary area of research is state responses to sub-state violence. His recent book The Counter-Insurgency Myth: The British Experience of Irregular War (Routledge, 2011) offers a… read more

Selected Publications

PhD supervision

Andrew is keen to hear from potential PhD students with research proposals in the area of proxy war, counter-insurgency warfare, sub-state violence, and Anglo-American security/foreign policy more widely.

Current Research

Andrew Mumford's primary area of research is state responses to sub-state violence. His recent book The Counter-Insurgency Myth: The British Experience of Irregular War (Routledge, 2011) offers a macro-level history of the evolution of British responses to asymmetric insurgent threats. He is also co-editor of International Law, Security and Ethics: Policy Challenges in the Post-9/11 World (Routledge, 2011) and The Theory and Practice of Irregular War: Warrior-Scholarship in Counterinsurgency. Andrew has published journal articles on a range of issues that explore how the British state in particular has attempted to deal with insurgencies, including torture, negotiations and reliance on air power. His latest book, Proxy Warfare was published by Polity in 2013.

Andrew is currently in the process of writing a book on the phenomena of of proxy wars in the international system. Under contract with Polity, this book aims to offer the first significant deconstruction of war conducted through third parties. This research project will set the international political and strategic background of proxy warfare in the modern world, tracing its development throughout the last century and posit it as a highly pertinent factor in contemporary conflict. It will also address the way in which proxy interference often prolongs conflicts given the perpetuity of arms, money and sometimes proxy fighters sponsored by third party donors, and to this extent can be held accountable for a significant amount of conflict casualties, both amongst the warring combatants but also amongst the civilian population. Furthermore, it will emphasis why, given the direction of the 'War on Terror' and the prominence now achieved by non-state actors in conflict analysis, this is an important time to be studying the phenomena of proxy warfare.

  • MUMFORD, A., 2013. Proxy warfare Polity.
  • 2013. Proxy Warfare and the Future of Conflict RUSI Journal. 158(2), 40-46
  • MUMFORD, A., 2012. The counter-insurgency myth: the British experience of irregular warfare Routledge.
  • MUMFORD, A., 2012. Minimum force meets brutality: detention, interrogation and torture in British counter-insurgency campaigns Journal of Military Ethics. 11(1), 10-25
  • ANDREW MUMFORD, 2011. ‘Counter-Insurgency Research: A Case of Recurring Amnesia’ At: International Studies Today, Vol.1 No.1
  • ANDREW MUMFORD, AIDAN HEHIR & NATASHA KUHRT, ed., 2011. International Law, Security and Ethics: Policy Challenges in the Post-9/11 World Routledge.
  • ANDREW MUMFORD, 2011. ‘Puncturing the Counterinsurgency Myth: Britain and Irregular Warfare in the Past, Present and Future’
  • ANDREW MUMFORD, 2009. ‘Unnecessary or Unsung? The Role of Air Power in Britain’s Colonial Counter-Insurgencies’ Small Wars and Insurgencies. Vol.20(No. 3/4), pp.636-55
  • ANDREW MUMFORD & CAROLINE KENNEDY-PIPE, 2009. ‘Is Torture Ever Justified? Torture, Rights and Rules from Northern Ireland to Iraq’. In: ANTHONY LANG AND AMANDA BEATTIE, ed., War, Torture and Terrorism: Rethinking the Rules of International Security Routledge. 54-68
  • ANDREW MUMFORD & CAROLINE KENNEDY-PIPE, 2007. ‘Torture, Rights, Rules and War: Ireland to Iraq’ International Relations. Vol.21(No. 1), 121-128.
  • ANDREW MUMFORD, 2005. ‘Intelligence Wars: Ireland and Afghanistan – The American Experience’ Civil Wars. Vol. 7(No. 4), 377-395

School of Politics and International Relations

University of Nottingham
University Park, Nottingham
NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 951 4862
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email: politics-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk