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Matthew Rendall

Lecturer in Politics and International Relations, Faculty of Social Sciences

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Biography

Matthew Rendall is Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at the University of Nottingham, and holds a PhD in Political Science from Columbia University. His earlier research focused on large-scale war and peace, including such topics as nuclear deterrence, whether there is a 'separate peace' among democracies, and collective security. This work often tested theories of war and peace through historical case studies, often drawing on original historical research. More recently he has also been writing about intergenerational justice, climate change and various topics in moral philosophy.

Expertise Summary

Teaching Summary

This autumn, I'll teach a third-year module on the ethics of climate change, and team-teach on democratic theory. In the spring, I'll teach an MA seminar called 'When Does Russia Expand, and Why?'

Research Summary

At present, I have two papers in draft: one in which I seek to formulate a new criterion for rule consequentialism that copes with cases where not all agents are behaving as they ought to, and a… read more

Recent Publications

PhD Supervision:

All areas of current research interest. More generally, I would be glad to supervise dissertations on the causes of war and peace, climate ethics and intergenerational justice.

PhD Students Supervised

Li Hak Yin, 'The Discrepancy of Chinese Foreign Policy, and its Implications Towards the World Order'

Poberezhskaya , Marianna, 'Contemporary media and the construction of anthropogenic climate change in the Russian Federation'

Gulnara Shalpykova, 'The Syr Darya River Basin: Cooperation under the Intractable Riparian Dilemma'

PhD Students Recently Completed

Kunal Mukherjee, 'From Pakistan to Londonistan: The Rise of a Home Grown Islamic Militancy in the UK'

Current Research

At present, I have two papers in draft: one in which I seek to formulate a new criterion for rule consequentialism that copes with cases where not all agents are behaving as they ought to, and a second that attacks the conventional economic approach to discounting future costs and benefits, and defends an alternative method. I've also begun work on a paper, 'Realism and Rational Choice' arguing that in representative democracies it only makes sense to vote for moral reasons. If such democracies pursue egoistic foreign policies, as realists claim states usually do, we must assume either inadequate information, irrational voters or defective democratic institutions.

Past Research

My dissertation evaluated competing explanations for the long European peace after 1815 through an analysis of Russia's Near Eastern policy, drawing on extensive research in Moscow's archives. I remain interested in the Concert of Europe and Russian foreign policy. ''Defensive realism and the Concert of Europe', appearing in The Review of International Studies in 2006, attacks John Mearsheimer's The Tragedy of Great Power Politics, arguing that defensive realism gives a better account of the long peace after 1815. I have also written about the Belgian crisis of 1830-32 and the Anglo-French crisis of 1840, and their implications for collective security and democratic peace theory.

Future Research

I have two books in mind: one on intergenerational justice, catastrophic risks, and consequentialist moral philosophy, and the other on the security dilemma and the outbreak of the Crimean War.

School of Politics and International Relations

Law and Social Sciences Building
The University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0)115 951 4862
fax: +44 (0)115 951 4859
email: politics-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk