CRAL
Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics
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Nottingham Psycholinguistics and Language Learning Lab

Welcome!

We are an interdisciplinary group that shares an interest in language processing and acquisition in a first and second language.

Our Lab is housed in the School of English in the Trent Building, where we do behavioural and eye-tracking research.

NPL3a
 

Current Projects and Research Interests

Multi-Word Units (MWU)

Conklin

What underpins the processing advantage for MWU (e.g. idioms, binomials, compounds, collocations, phrasal verbs)?

Reading words and multi-word units in context

Conklin

How are unknown words and MWU read in context and does this change with exposure?

Interlingual homographs, homophones, and cognates

Conklin

How does interlingual overlap influence second language processing?

 

Reading one word at a time

Conklin

Because of handheld devices readers increasingly read one word at a time? How does this impact their comprehension?

Incidental language learning

Conklin

What words do learners acquire simply from reading or watching TV and movies?

Applying Science to Literature

Conklin, Guy, Scott

How do readers engage with the variants in a text that editions make available?

 

Eye-tracking lexical patterns in Dickens

Conklin

What can eye-tracking tell us about the processing of lexical patterns in prose fiction?

Irony, Emoticons & Emotion

Thompson

How do we use and understand irony and emoticons? What is our emotional response to them?

 

 
If you are interested in pursuing one of these projects for a PhD, please email the relevant supervisor(s).

Who we are

 

 In The Lab

  • EyeLink 1000+ with ExperimentBuilder and DataViewer
  • E-Prime
  • DMDX
  • BioSemi Active-Two Amplifier and EDA & EMG electrodes

PRG - Psycholinguistics Research Group

We are an active group in the Schools of English and Psychology who meet weekly to discuss research and develop research projects across the disciplines of psycholinguistics and first and second language processing.

If you are interested in joining please email for information – or just show up at one of the meetings.

Spring Semester 2017

Meetings: Tue 10:00-12:00, Trent A49

31 Jan Organizational meeting
7 Feb
Giulia Grisot, presenting a paper
14 Feb Walter van Heuven, presenting data
21 Feb
Fabio Prente, presenting data
28 Feb
Meredith Cicerchia, presenting a paper
7 Mar
Stats discussion of JML paper
14 Mar
Stats discussion of GEE
21 Mar
CUNY Conference presentation practice
28 Mar
Ben Neurohr, presenting a paper
4 Apr
Bea González, presenting a paper
9 May
Pera TBA
16 May Sara Alotaibi, presenting data
 

Recent Publications

  • Doherty, A. & Conklin, K. (2016). How gender expectancy affects the processing of “them”. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. Available Online First, 1-46.
  • Conklin, K. & Pellicer-Sánchez, A. (2016). Using eye-tracking in applied linguistics and second language acquisition research. Second Language Research, 32(3), 453-467.
  • Thompson, D., Leuthold, H., & Filik, R. (2016). Emotional responses to irony and emoticons in written language: Evidence from EDA and facial EMG. Psychophysiology, 53, 1054–1062.
  • Thompson, D. & Filik, R. Sarcasm in written communication: Emoticons are efficient markers of intention. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 21(2), 105-120.
  • Carrol, G. Conklin, K., & Gyllstad, H. (2016). Found in translation: the influence of L1 on the processing of idioms in L2. Studies in Second Language Acquisition. 38(3), 403-443.
  • Guy, J., Scott, R., Carrol, G., & Conklin, K. (2016). Challenges in Editing Late Nineteenth-and Early Twentieth-Century Prose Fiction: What Is Editorial “Completeness”? English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920, 59(4), 435-455.
  • Carrol, G., Conklin, K. Guy, J., & Scott, R. (2015). Processing punctuation in different versions of prose fiction. Scientific Study of Literature, 5(2), 200-228.
  • Carrol, G. & Conklin, K. (2015). Cross language priming extends to formulaic units: evidence from eye-tracking suggests that this idea “has legs”. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, Available online first, 1-19.
  • Carrol, G., Conklin, K., & Gyllstad, H. (2016). Found in translation: the influence of L1 on the processing of idioms in L2. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, Available online first, 1-41.
  • Guy, J., & Scott, R., Carrol, G., & Conklin, K. (2016). Editorial "Completeness" and the Challenges of Editing Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Prose Fiction. English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920, 59(4), 1-21.
  • Boo, P. & Conklin, K. (2015). The effects on RSVP on reading comprehension in an L1 and L2. Journal of Second Language Teaching and Research, 4(1), 111-129.
  • Carrol, G. & Conklin, K. (2015). Cross language priming extends to formulaic units: evidence from eye-tracking suggests that this idea “has legs”. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, Available online first, 1-19.
  • Allen, D., Conklin, K., & Van Heuven, W.J.B. (2015). Making Sense of the Sense model: Translation priming with Japanese-English bilinguals. Mental Lexicon, 10(1), 32-52.
  • Bisson, M-.J., Van Heuven, W.J.B., Conklin, K., & Tunney, R.J. (2015). The Role of Verbal and Pictorial Information in Multi-Modal Incidental Acquisition of Foreign Language Vocabulary. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 68(7), 1306-1326.
  • Rodgers, M.P.H., & Webb, S. (2011). Narrow viewing: The vocabulary in related television programs. TESOL Quarterly, 45(4), 689-717.

Recent Events and News

7th Formulaic Language Research Network Conference, Vilnius, Lithuania, June 2016

  • Carrol & Conklin. (2016). The Queen and King are out of order: Effects of frequency on the processing of binomial phrases.

BAAL Annual Meeting, Birmingham, UK, September 2015

  • Pellicer-Sánchez & Siyanova-Chanturia. Learning collocations from L2 reading: An eye-tracking study.
  • Rodgers. Comprehension of episodes of authentic television by EFL language learners.

25th EUROSLA Conference, Aix-en-Provence, France, August 2015

  • Pellicer-Sánchez & Siyanova-Chanturia. Using eye-tracking to examine L2 incidental learning of collocations from reading.

18th European Conference on Eye Movements, Vienna, Austria, August 2015

  • Conklin & Carrol. Found in translation: what eye movement data can tell us about the development of formulaic language in bilingual speakers.
  • Carrol & Conklin. No word is an island: How eye-tracking helps us to understand the processing advantage when native speakers read familiar sequences.

University Endowed Award, May 2015

  • Gareth Carrol received the award for his outstanding PhD research and his contributions to the research environment in the School of English.
 

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Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics

The University of Nottingham
Nottingham
NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 951 5900
fax: +44 (0) 115 951 5924
email: cral@nottingham.ac.uk