Gas Turbine and Transmissions Research Centre
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Herve Morvan

Director of the Institute for Aerospace Technology, APVC Innovation, Business Engagement & Impact, and Professor of Applied Fluid Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering

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Biography

Hervé Morvan is the Director of the Institute for Aerospace Technology (IAT) and a Professor in Applied Fluid Mechanics in the Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering.

He also supports the office of Professor Dame Jessica Corner, PVC Research & Knowledge Exchange, with particular focus on innovation, business engagement & impact.

Hervé is a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, a member of the ATI Special Advisory Group (Propulsion) and a Director of the Midlands Aerospace Alliance (MAA).

  • Hervé joined Nottingham from ANSYS in 2003, as a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) specialist. Since then he has been awarded in excess of £15m in funding from EPSRC, ATI, IUK, the EC and from industry, mainly working on the simulation of single and two-phase internal flow problems for application to the aerospace (aeroengine fluid systems) and energy (oil and gas) sectors. He also coordinates the 'INNOVATE' and 'INNOVATIVE' Marie Curie ITNs based at Nottingham (total of 37 researchers).
  • Hervé's main industrial association has been with Rolls-Royce and in particular the company's Fluid Systems Group and Transmission and Drives SCU. In 2009 Hervé spent 6 months in the company as a Royal Academy of Engineering fellow and CFD specialist and, from 2009 to March 2013, was seconded to the company as a consultant for one day per week. He had to abandon this role (though he remains an occasional consultant to the company) as he took on his current position in the IAT.
  • Hervé is the Head of Group for the Gas Turbine and Transmissions Research Centre (G2TRC), also the home to the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre (UTC) in Gas Turbine Transmission Systems, a 45 strong research team with a strong focus on oil systems, sealing technologies and rotordynamics, and the simulation of those. He collaborates closely with Prof Seamus Garvey, who leads the UTC, and Dr Kathy Simmons. The Thermo-Fluids group has made quite an impact delivering design guidelines in use in the company as well as developing and progressing numerical methods beyond TRL4. The team also regularly supports project activities.
  • Hervé's research leadership role and biggest challenge is to lead the Institute for Aerospace Technology, work with government and industry to create bridges between academic research and industry, articulate a research programme that delivers high quality outputs and support their ambitions and those of the University, federate colleagues around this research agenda, deliver the funding and necessary research and progress the development and integration of aerospace technologies to TRL6. He ambitions for the IAT to help achieve demonstration and to contribute to the acceleration of the delivery of innovation, to benefit the aerospace sector and meet its demands -currents points of emphasis are on right-first time digital design and the electrification of propulsion systems for example. Hervé is passionate about aerospace and aerospace research and relishes the challenge and the ambitions Nottingham has for this sector, which is one the priority areas for the University.
  • Linked to the above Hervé is working with key academics across the University to raise the University profile and promote activities in Transport Technology research at Nottingham and as part of the Midlands Innovation consortium. Propulsion and power systems research, the electrification of transport, lightweighting, intelligent vehicles and transport infrastructure and mobility are central to this University Research Priority Area (RPA), which he formed and led in its early stages, from May 2015 till July 2016.

In a more public way, Hervé has also made a significant contribution to the Speedo 2008 and 2012 Olympics Campaigns as the Speedo Aqualab CFD advisor. Swimming burst onto the scene in and after 2008, partly as a result of the success of the British Swimming team and of the Speedo LZR Racer the Aqualab team, he was a core member of, developed.

Some of the coverage from the collaboration with Speedo:

In Aug. 2009 he was awarded the 16th Harold J. Schoemaker Award by IAHR for his paper "The Concept of Roughness in Fluvial Hydraulics and Its Formulation in 1D, 2D, and 3D Numerical Simulation Models", J. Hyd. Res., 46(2), pp. 191-208, 2008 (with co-authors), at the 33rd IAHR World Congress in Vancouver, BC, Canada. This award is for the most outstanding paper published in Hydraulic Research during the previous two years (link: http://content.asce.org/files/pdf/IAHR09_Onsite_Program.pdf).

Expertise Summary

Aerospace and aerospace technology

Fluid mechanics

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

Internal flow problems (single and two phase flow)

External aero- and hydro-dynamics and Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI).

Teaching Summary

Computational Fluid Dynamics (MM4CFD)

Computational and Modelling Techniques (MM3CMT)

Advanced Technology Review -Aeroengines (MM4ATR)

Research Summary

Hervé is interested in the simulation of internal two phase flow problems with and without HT for application to the aerospace and energy sectors. His particular areas of expertise are in aeroengine… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Hervé is interested in the simulation of internal two phase flow problems with and without HT for application to the aerospace and energy sectors. His particular areas of expertise are in aeroengine fluid systems, engine transmission systems, engine core heat management and general two-phase flow problems (distribution, pipe flow, separation, corrosion etc.).

He has developed and extended thin film models and VOF, but he also pursues a line of research on Smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), and in particular its extension to two phase flow.

He is however always keen to explore new challenges; recently, he has worked with colleagues in materials and electrical engineering to develop a method to predict the extrusion of optic fibres to meet a set design, thus reducing the expenses of a longer experimental programme.

He has successfully supervised 13 PhD students to completion since 2005.

Gas Turbine and Transmissions Research Centre

The University of Nottingham
Faculty of Engineering
Nottingham, NG7 2RD


telephone: +44 (0)115 74 86398
email:ez-g2trc@exmail.nottingham.ac.uk