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David Gardner

Professor of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

David Gardner is a Professor of Physiology in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham.

From 2003, for a period of 5 years, David held a British Heart Foundation Basic Science Lectureship at Nottingham, and was briefly, prior to that, a Senior Research Fellow in the School of Human Development. He initially studied Zoology and Physiology at the University of London (First Class, 1994; Royal Holloway College) and completed a PhD in nutrition (University of Southampton, 1997). After graduating, David spent five years as a postdoctoral research fellow studying fetal physiology in the Department of Physiology, University of Cambridge. In 2016 David received his DSc for research work into 'Nutrition from Development through to Disease'.

Expertise Summary

Dr Gardner's expertise is in physiology, in particular, understanding how nutrition can affect cardiovascular, metabolic and/or renal physiology in the context of healthy aging.

Teaching Summary

Dr Gardner has been Module Convenor for The Urinary System (D12URI) which runs in year 2/5 of the undergraduate veterinary curriculum (BVM BVS). Dr Gardner contributes toward teaching in renal… read more

Research Summary

The particular research questions that I am interested in at present are the mechanisms that lead to an acute loss of kidney function (Acute Kidney Injury or AKI) and how we may either prevent it… read more

Selected Publications

Present Research Team:

Louise Lloyd - postdoctoral research associate

Dr Weng Oh - MD project student

Present Collaborators:

University of Nottingham

Dr Simon Welham, School of Biosciences

Prof Kevin Sinclair, School of Biosciences

Dr Jim Craigon, School of Biosciences

Prof Sheila Gardiner, School of Medicine

Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh

Dr Emad Al-Dujaili

Nottingham University NHS Trust

Dr Mark Devonald

Dr Tom McCulloch

Dr Zsolt Hodi

Past postgraduates and postdoctoral fellows:

Dr Louise Lloyd (graduated 2012)

Dr Clint Gray (graduated 2011)

Dr Philip Rhodes (graduated 2011)

Dr Petra Bos (graduated 2010)

Dr Gosala Gopalakrishnan (graduated 2005)

Dr Jaime Hughes - postdoctoral research fellow (2010-2011).

Dr Angeliki Karamitri - postdoctoral research fellow (2009-2010).

Dr Kevin Ryan - postdoctoral research fellow (2009-2010).

Dr Sylvain Sebert - postdoctoral research fellow (2009-2010).

Dr Matthew Elmes - postdoctoral research fellow (2009-2010).

Dr Gardner has been Module Convenor for The Urinary System (D12URI) which runs in year 2/5 of the undergraduate veterinary curriculum (BVM BVS). Dr Gardner contributes toward teaching in renal physiology (D12URI), endocrinology (D12ECN) and fetal and adult cardiovascular function (D11CRS). His teaching is directly informed by his past and present research in large and small animals.

Current Research

The particular research questions that I am interested in at present are the mechanisms that lead to an acute loss of kidney function (Acute Kidney Injury or AKI) and how we may either prevent it happening or, if that is not possible, then help the kidneys quickly recover their function. This work is conducted in association with other scientists at Nottingham and with clinicians in the Renal and Transplant Unit, NUH NHS Trust, City Hospital, Nottingham. This research aligns with the Diagnostics and Therapeutics research area in the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science and the Regenerative Medicine and Stem-Cells research priority area of the University of Nottingham. I also have an on-going, and underpinning, interest in nutrition and health. In the past i have investigated the relationship between what mothers eat before and during pregnancy and the health of their subsequent children - that is, whether they have a greater propensity to develop kidney disease or high blood pressure. This research area has become known as the developmental origins of health and disease. We know what constitutes a healthy lifestyle (lots of fruit, vegetables, fibre, physical activity) and we know what is unhealthy (high intake of simple sugars and/or refined foods, being sedentary). The developmental origins paradigm suggests that some people may just have to work a bit harder at being healthy if, for example, they were exposed to a poor nutritional environment early in their lives. If we are able to identify those individuals then we can better prepare and advise them on how to maintain good health and live a long, prosperous and fulfilling life.

All my published output and metrics are freely available online though Pubmed Central,

Researchgate (https://www.researchgate.net/profile/David_Gardner) or

Google Scholar (https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=npO5djcAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=ao)

Orchid ID: 0000-0002-6490-2412

School of Veterinary Medicine and Science

University of Nottingham
Sutton Bonington Campus
Leicestershire, LE12 5RD

telephone: +44 (0)115 951 6116
fax: +44 (0)115 951 6415
email: veterinary-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk