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Lynn Fotheringham

Lecturer in Classics, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

I grew up in Glasgow but went to Edinburgh University where I graduated with an MA in Classics in 1991. I have studied and worked in different countries, spending what would now be called my 'gap year' at Iowa State University, teaching English in Xanthi in Northern Greece after graduating, and doing a Masters degree at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania before returning to the UK to do my D.Phil at the University of Oxford. I taught in University College Dublin for a year before coming to Nottingham in 1999. I live in Nottingham with my partner, Matt Brooker, a comics-artist who has collaborated with me on both teaching and research. We continue to travel whenever we can, having spent recent research-leave periods in Vienna, Thessaloniki, and Gijón in Northern Spain.

Expertise Summary

My main areas of expertise are Ciceronian judicial oratory, the teaching of Latin, and the Reception of the Classical World. My work on Cicero includes a focus on stylistc analysis (facilitated by concordance-work) which is also important in my Latin teaching. Reception areas I am interested in include Greek tragedy on television, and various other aspects of the Classical world in comics/novels/films, as well as the history of Ciceronian scholarship.

Teaching Summary

My teaching is currently focused on Latin language and the linked themes of Reception/creative responses to the ancient world. In the past I have taught a broad range of modules in Greek and Roman… read more

Research Summary

I am currently working on several Ciceronian topics that did not fit into my 2013 commentary on the Pro Milone: the treatment of Milo's trial in works by the later writers Asconius, Plutarch and… read more

Recent Publications

  • LYNN FOTHERINGHAM, 2016. The lives of Cicero: aspects of 19th-century biography. In: GESINE MANUWALD, ed., The Afterlife of Cicero Institute of Classical Studies. (In Press.)
  • LYNN FOTHERINGHAM, 2016. Introduction. In: ROBERT WEST and LYNN FOTHERINGHAM, eds., Cicero Pro Milone: A selection 1. Bloomsbury Academic. 1-40
  • LYNN FOTHERINGHAM, 2015. Plutarch and Dio on Cicero at the trial of Milo. In: RHIANNON ASH, JUDITH MOSSMAN and FRANCES B. TITCHENER, eds., Fame and Infamy: Essays for Christopher Pelling on Characterization in Greek and Roman Biography and Historiography 1. Oxford University Press.
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2013. Twentieth/Twenty-first century Cicero(s). In: STEEL, C., ed., The Cambridge companion to Cicero Cambridge University Press. 350-373

My teaching is currently focused on Latin language and the linked themes of Reception/creative responses to the ancient world. In the past I have taught a broad range of modules in Greek and Roman literature, Greek and Latin language, and late Roman Republican history. I am particularly enthusiastic about creating opportunities for students to gain understanding of the ancient languages at whatever level is appropriate to them.

Q83IL1 Intermediate Latin 1: for those students who did Beginners Latin (or equivalent) in a previous year, regardless of the stage they have reached in their degree. The module is usually taken by a mixture of second- and third-years and M.A. students. For many of these it is the first time that they have read 'real' Latin, having concentrated on learning the grammar in the previous year. When teaching this module, I use Cicero's Pro Archia as the text, because this short speech allows you to get the feeling of achievement that comes from reading a complete text, and because there is a good edition of the text that has lots of help for students. I use the concordance-based approach developed in my research to generate vocabulary-lists and facilitate a systematic approach to the revision of syntax. The assessment of this module involves a Portfolio built up from frequent coursework exercises rather than a closed-book exam at the end of the module. This gives students at this stage of language-acquisition the chance to display their increasing ability to analyse Latin and de-emphasises memorisation and recall.

Other Latin modules: I also teach Latin at post-Intermediate level. Texts include Virgil's Eclogues and Lucretius De Rerum Natura 1.

Q83CPC Classics and Popular Culture: I am one of several contributors to this team-taught module, which is a core module for second-year students in Ancient History/Classical Civilisation. I cover a range of topics, many of which are closely connected to my current research: on-screen versions of Greek tragedy; representation of Sparta/Cleopatra/Nero in novels, films, comics and popular history; cinematic representations of tourists and travelers visiting Greece.

Q82105 Independent Second-Year Project: I convene this module for second-year students in the Department of Classics, which has been a flag-ship for the Department's innovative approach to teaching and assessment for twenty years now. The module's focus is on communicating knowledge of the ancient world outside the Academcy: students choose both the subject-matter and format of their work: website, teaching-plan, travel guide, reconstruction, fiction, artwork, ... This approach develops the ability to work independently, and the emphasis on communication enhances employability; students may also choose a product-type related to a possible future career. For those who have taken Q83CPC, the module builds on the training that module provides in analysing non-academic products which respond to the ancient world; the focus shifts in Spring to making a product of your own.

Current Research

I am currently working on several Ciceronian topics that did not fit into my 2013 commentary on the Pro Milone: the treatment of Milo's trial in works by the later writers Asconius, Plutarch and Cassius Dio; 19th-century biographies of Cicero and commentaries on his speeches; Steven Saylor's detective novels and stories featuring Ciceronian trials. This work will lead to a series of articles; some of it forms part of my next book, a monograph on Reception.

I am also writing up conference-papers on two non-Ciceronian topics for publication in edited volumes. Both focus on Reception, looking at the presentation of slavery in modern novels set in the ancient world, and at Don Taylor's productions of Greek tragedy for the BBC. I continue to work with my colleage Steve Hodkinson and the comics-writer Kieron Giillen (author of Three), exploring the process of collaboration between academics and people working in the creative industries.

Past Research

My past publications cluster in two areas: Cicero's speeches; and various aspects of Reception.

My commentary on Cicero's Pro Milone focuses on the structure of the speech, using insights from Discourse Analysis and a computer-generated concordance of the speech to enhance our appreciation of Cicero's verbal skill. I exploit to use this approach in my teaching.

My work on Reception has looked at positive and negative representations of ancient Sparta, and at the process of adapting epic for the screen.

Future Research

My next book will be a monograph on Reception, using the idea of 'authenticity' to unite my diverse interests in this field. I plan to cover:

  • two very different on-screen versions of Euripides' Iphigenia in Aulis;
  • Steven Saylor's detective novels and stories featuring Ciceronian trials;
  • the cinematic presentation of tourists and travellers visiting the Classical countries;
  • the sanitisation of Hercules and other Greek heroes in comics and cinema;
  • collaboration between academics and people working in the creative industries.

The book will explore the different ideas of 'authenticity' held by creators and audiences, and how the discourse around this concept shapes both production and response. There will be an emphasis on the limitations on any possible 'authenticity', and an exploration of the different possible results of a creator's work with the ancient sources. A strong theme will be the opposition between a reverential approach to the Classical world and a more 'gritty', supposedly realistic one.

As part of this project I am working on bringing the 2012 BFI mini-season, "Classics on TV: Greek Tragedy on the Small Screen", to the Lakeside Arts Centre in 2015/16. I will develop activities to accompany these screenings and will use the opportunity to conduct some audience-research.

I will be on research leave in spring 2015/16.

  • LYNN FOTHERINGHAM, 2016. The lives of Cicero: aspects of 19th-century biography. In: GESINE MANUWALD, ed., The Afterlife of Cicero Institute of Classical Studies. (In Press.)
  • LYNN FOTHERINGHAM, 2016. Introduction. In: ROBERT WEST and LYNN FOTHERINGHAM, eds., Cicero Pro Milone: A selection 1. Bloomsbury Academic. 1-40
  • LYNN FOTHERINGHAM, 2015. Plutarch and Dio on Cicero at the trial of Milo. In: RHIANNON ASH, JUDITH MOSSMAN and FRANCES B. TITCHENER, eds., Fame and Infamy: Essays for Christopher Pelling on Characterization in Greek and Roman Biography and Historiography 1. Oxford University Press.
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2013. Twentieth/Twenty-first century Cicero(s). In: STEEL, C., ed., The Cambridge companion to Cicero Cambridge University Press. 350-373
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S. and BROOKER, M., 2013. Storyboarding and epic. In: LOVATT, H.V. and VOUT, C., eds., Epic visions: visuality in Greek and Latin epic and its reception Cambridge University Press. 168-190
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2013. Persuasive language in Cicero's Pro Milone: a close reading and commentary Institute of Classical Studies.
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2012. The positive portrayal of Sparta in late-twentieth-century fiction. In: HODKINSON, S. and MORRIS, I.M., eds., Sparta in modern thought: politics, history and culture Classical Press of Wales. 393-428
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2009. An Action Research Approach to Assessment and Learning on a Second Year Classics Module. In: SIDOROVITCH, A., ed., Teaching for Integrative Learning: Innovations in University Practice 2. Nottingham: Centre for Integrative Learning. 48-58
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2007. The numbers in the margins and the structure of Cicero's Pro Murena Greece & Rome. 54(1), 40-60
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2007. Having your cake and eating it: how Cicero combines arguments. In: POWELL, J.G.F. and RUBINSTEIN, L., eds., Logos: rational argument in ancient rhetoric London: Institute of Classical Studies. 69-90 (In Press.)
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2007. Cicero detective? Omnibus. 16-19
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2006. Cicero's fear: multiple readings of Pro Milone 1-4 Materiali e Discussioni per l'Analisi dei Testi Classici. 57, 63-83
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2006. Gliding transitions and the analysis of structure: Cicero's <i>Pro Archia</i>. In: DEROUX, C., ed., Studies in Latin literature and Roman history 13. Brussels: Latomus. 32-52
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2004. Repetition and Unity in a Civil Law Speech: The <i>Pro Caecina</i>. In: POWELL, J.G.F. and PATERSON, J.J., eds., Cicero the Advocate Oxford: Oxford University Press. 253-76
  • FOTHERINGHAM, L.S., 2000. Marking the Messenger: Language and Function in Greek Tragedy In: Theatre: Ancient and Modern. Selected Proceedings of a Two-Day International Research Conference.
  • LYNN FOTHERINGHAM, In: FIONA HOBDEN and AMANDA WRIGLEY, eds., Broadcasting Ancient Greece on Television Edinburgh University Press. (In Press.)

Department of Classics

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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