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Edmund Stewart

Assistant Professor in Ancient Greek History, Faculty of Arts

Contact

  • workRoom B5 (Office Hours: Monday 3-4, Wednesday 10-11) Humanities
    University Park
    Nottingham
    NG7 2RD
    UK
  • work+44 (0)115 95 14810

Biography

I am originally from London and I completed my first degree in Classics at the University of Edinburgh. After a brief spell in Oxford for my Masters, I began my PhD at Nottingham in 2009 on the subject of the dissemination of Greek tragedy during the fifth and fourth centuries BC, under the supervision of Patrick Finglass and Alan Sommerstein. I graduated in December 2013. I have taught Classics as a teaching associate at Warwick (2016/17), Nottingham (2012/13) and the University of Leeds (2013/14). In addition, I have taught English for Academic Purposes at the University of Lincoln and University College London. I am very pleased to now be rejoining my alma mater.

Expertise Summary

My research covers Greek social and economic history, the history of Greek drama and festival culture, Greek tragedy and Greek lyric.

Teaching Summary

I have taught modules on a wide range of subjects in the fields of both Greek and Latin languages, literature and ancient history. Modules I have developed and convened include: Greek Politics and… read more

Research Summary

I am currently developing research into ideas of work in antiquity and specifically ancient professionalism in fifth and fourth century Athens. This project aims to enhance our understanding of the… read more

Recent Publications

  • EDMUND STEWART, 2019. Ion of Chios: The case of a foreign poet in classical Sparta. Classical Quarterly. 68(2), 394-407
  • 2018. Ezekiel's Exagoge: A typical Hellenistic tragedy? Greek Roman and Byzantine Studies. 58, 223-52
  • 2018. Spartan choruses and foreign poets: an antidote to civil strife?. In: Conflict in the Peloponnese: Social, Military and Intellectual.: Proceedings of the 2nd CSPS PG and Early Career Conference Online Publication 4. The Centre for Spartan & Peloponnesian Studies. 111-32
  • STEWART, E, 2017. Greek tragedy on the move: the birth of a panhellenic art form c. 500-300 BC Oxford : Oxford University Press.

I have taught modules on a wide range of subjects in the fields of both Greek and Latin languages, literature and ancient history. Modules I have developed and convened include: Greek Politics and the Economy, Greek Religion, Greek Tyrants, Women in the Greek World, Wine and Song: Greek Lyric, Greek Tragedy: Orestes on stage in classical Athens, and Interpreting Ancient Literature.

I would be interested in supervising postgraduate dissertations on any subject within the fields of Greek political, economic and social history (especially on professionalism and work or festivals and festival culture), Greek drama and Greek lyric.

I will be on research leave during the whole academic year of 2019/20.

PhD Students:

Jason Porter: Slavery and Strategies of Slave Owning in Classical Athens

Malcolm Belfield: Tragic Tetralogies

Current Research

I am currently developing research into ideas of work in antiquity and specifically ancient professionalism in fifth and fourth century Athens. This project aims to enhance our understanding of the social and economic pressures affecting professionals and thus provide a new perspective from which to interpret the texts and material culture they produced. The impact of skill (techne) on the ancient city has received relatively little attention, yet professionals (such as poets, seers, sculptors, bankers or doctors) formed an important social category within the ancient city and the overall labour market. This research aims to reveal a neglected social category in the ancient city, the professional class, as well as to better understand the workings of the ancient labour market.

I organized an international conference held at Nottingham in June 2016 entitled 'Skilled Labour and Professionalism in Ancient Greece and Rome'. An edited volume based on the proceedings of that conference is currently forthcoming with Cambridge University Press.

Past Research

The findings of my doctoral research were published by Oxford University Press in 2017 as a monograph entitled

  • EDMUND STEWART, 2019. Ion of Chios: The case of a foreign poet in classical Sparta. Classical Quarterly. 68(2), 394-407
  • 2018. Ezekiel's Exagoge: A typical Hellenistic tragedy? Greek Roman and Byzantine Studies. 58, 223-52
  • 2018. Spartan choruses and foreign poets: an antidote to civil strife?. In: Conflict in the Peloponnese: Social, Military and Intellectual.: Proceedings of the 2nd CSPS PG and Early Career Conference Online Publication 4. The Centre for Spartan & Peloponnesian Studies. 111-32
  • STEWART, E, 2017. Greek tragedy on the move: the birth of a panhellenic art form c. 500-300 BC Oxford : Oxford University Press.
  • EDMUND STEWART, 2016. An ancient theatre dynastry: The elder Carcinus, the young Xenocles and the sons of Carcinus in Aristophanes Philologus. 160, 1-18
  • EDMUND STEWART, 2016. Professionalism and the poetic persona in archaic Greece Cambridge Classical Journal. 62, 200-223
  • EDMUND STEWART, 2014. Professionalism in Ancient Athletics Nikephoros: Journal of Sports and Culture in Antiquity. 27, 273-93
  • EDMUND STEWART, Tragedy and tyranny: Euripides, Archelaus of Macedon and popular patronage. In: SIAN LEWIS, ed., Tyranny: New Contexts Presses Universitaires de Franche ComtĂ©. (In Press.)
  • EDMUND STEWART, EDWARD HARRIS and DAVID LEWIS, eds., Skilled Labour and Professionalism in Ancient Greece and Rome Cambridge University Press. (In Press.)

Department of Classics and Archaeology

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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