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Emily Kneebone

Assistant Professor in Ancient Greek Literature, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

After completing my undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Cambridge, I held a Research Fellowship at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, and a fixed-term Lectureship at the University of Edinburgh. Before coming to Nottingham in January 2018, I was Co-Investigator of an AHRC-funded project exploring the cultural history of imperial Greek epic, and College Lecturer and Director of Studies in Classics at Newnham College, Cambridge.

Teaching Summary

I enjoy teaching a wide range of topics in Greek and Latin literature, language, and culture. My current and upcoming teaching includes Intermediate and Advanced Greek modules on Greek tragedy and on… read more

Research Summary

I work primarily on Greek literature written under the Roman empire, with a particular focus on Greek epic poetry of the 1st-5th centuries AD. I have published articles on heroic ethics in… read more

I enjoy teaching a wide range of topics in Greek and Latin literature, language, and culture. My current and upcoming teaching includes Intermediate and Advanced Greek modules on Greek tragedy and on Plato's views on poetry; a first-year overview of Latin literature; and a new module on the representation of animals in the ancient world.

Current Research

I work primarily on Greek literature written under the Roman empire, with a particular focus on Greek epic poetry of the 1st-5th centuries AD. I have published articles on heroic ethics in posthomeric Greek epic; diaspora Jewish identity in Josephus' adaptation of the Hebrew Bible for a Greco-Roman audience; the representation of mortal expertise in didactic poetry; and talking animals in later Greek poetry and prose. I am also editing a volume of translations of imperial Greek epic poems, and am currently completing a book on Oppian's Halieutica, a second-century didactic epic on the sea and the wily, hostile fish that inhabit it. My next project will explore new ways of reading imperial Greek epic poetry as a corpus of literature, examining these texts as a vibrant expression of ancient cultural, political, literary, and religious debates.

Department of Classics and Archaeology

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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