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Matt Myers

Teaching Associate in Roman History, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

Originally from Teesside, I completed my undergraduate degree in Ancient History and History at the University of Leicester before moving to Nottingham for my MA in Classical Literature. I remained in Nottingham to study for an AHRC funded PhD in Classics, under the supervision of Helen Lovatt and Simon Malloch. In October 2018 I rejoined the Department of Classics and Archaeology as a Teaching Associate in Roman History. My main area of interest lies in the history and historiography of the early Roman empire, particularly the works of Tacitus. I also have broader interests in the role of violence in the ancient world, as well as the themes of space, visuality, and sensory perception in Latin literature.

Outside of work I can usually be found mountain biking, taking in live music, or spending too much time and money in local record shops.

Teaching Summary

My office hours in Spring 2019 are: Tuesdays 4-5; Wednesdays 2-3.

In the 18/19 academic year I am teaching on the following modules:

Level 1:

Studying the Roman World

Interpreting Ancient History

Level 2/3:

Violence in the Roman World

Augustus Special Subject

Intermediate Latin

Studying Classical Scholarship

Classics and TV

The Christian Empire

MA:

Researching the Ancient World

Ancient War and its Representations

Research Summary

My PhD thesis, entitled Vision and Space in Tacitus, focused on the role of visuality in the works of the Roman historian Tacitus. In particular, I examined the role of vision and space in the… read more

Current Research

My PhD thesis, entitled Vision and Space in Tacitus, focused on the role of visuality in the works of the Roman historian Tacitus. In particular, I examined the role of vision and space in the politics of Tacitus' history writing, emphasising the importance of these concepts in his depiction of imperial power and its manipulation in the early principate. I feel there is still a lot to be said about visuality in Tacitus and am currently beginning to revise my thesis for publication as a monograph in the coming years. I am also in the early stages of research into the role of sensory perception in Roman historiography more generally.

Department of Classics and Archaeology

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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