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Pieter Houten

Research Fellow, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

Pieter Houten (1984) obtained his BA and Research MA degrees in History at Utrecht University. His PhD-dissertation Civitates Hispaniae was carried out at Leiden University between 2013 and 2018 within the ERC-funded project 'An Empire of 2000 Cities'. Afterwards he has been working as a lecturer for the History departments at Leiden en Utrecht University, in addition he taught Academic Skills at the Humanities faculty of Leiden University.

Currently he is working within the LatinNow project at the Centre for the Study of Ancient Documents in Oxford. The focus of his research within the LatinNow project is on the Latinization during the Imperial period, especially on those who learn to speak and write Latin after the initial contact. To understand this development the use of epigraphy within the imperial urban/rural domains and the distribution of instrumenta scripta/scriptoria will be studied. GIS-database will be used to display and study the spread of the epigraphy and instrumenta as to understand the development and to gain new insights into the distribution of writing and literacy.

Research Summary

His research focus within the LatinNow project concerns Latinization on the Iberian Peninsula during the Imperial period. With the knowledge he has obtained writing his PhD-thesis Civitates Hispaniae… read more

Current Research

His research focus within the LatinNow project concerns Latinization on the Iberian Peninsula during the Imperial period. With the knowledge he has obtained writing his PhD-thesis Civitates Hispaniae on Imperial urbanization, he will build on the research regarding the Latinization of the Republican period by Dr Moncunill and Dr EstarĂ¡n. The focus of his research is on the Latinization during the Imperial period, especially on those who learn to speak and write Latin after the initial contact. To understand this development the use of epigraphy within the imperial urban/rural domains and the distribution of instrumenta scripta/scriptoria will be studied. In addition he will use a GIS-database to display the spread of the epigraphy and instrumenta as to understand the development and to gain new insights into the distribution of writing and literacy.

Past Research

Pieter has finished his PhD-dissertation Civitates Hispaniae: urbanisation on the Iberian Peninsula during the High Empire, within the ERC-funded project, 'An empire of 2000 cities', directed by Prof. Luuk de Ligt and Prof. John Bintliff. The principal aims of his book are to provide a comprehensive reconstruction of the urban systems of the Iberian Peninsula during the High Empire and to explain why these systems looked the way they did. While some chapters focus on settlements that were cities or towns from a juridical point of view, the implications of using a purely functional definition of towns are also explored. Key themes include continuities and discontinuities between pre-Roman and Roman settlement patterns, the geographical distribution of cities belonging to various size brackets, economic relationships between self-governing cities and their territories, and the role of cities as nodes in road systems and maritime networks. In addition, it is argued that a considerable number of self-governing communities in Roman Spain and Portugal were polycentric rather based on a single urban centre.

Department of Classics and Archaeology

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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