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Tiziana D'Angelo

Assistant Professor in Ancient Greek and Roman Art, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

Born and raised in Italy, I completed my first degree in Classics at Collegio Ghislieri, Università degli Studi di Pavia, and then received an MPhil in Classical Archaeology from the University of Oxford and a PhD in Classical Archaeology from Harvard University. Prior to joining the Department of Classics and Archaeology at Nottingham in 2018, I was a fixed-term Lecturer in Classical Art and Archaeology at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow and Director of Studies in Classics at St Edmund's College Cambridge (2014-2018). I have also held a Jane and Morgan Whitney Fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (2013-2014), an AIA/DAI Fellowship at the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut in Berlin (2013), a Predoctoral Fellowship at the Getty Research Institute (Getty Villa) in Los Angeles (2012-2013), a Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship from the Phi Beta Kappa Society, Washington DC (2011-2012), and an Agnes Mongan Curatorial Internship at the Harvard Art Museums in Cambridge MA (2010-2011). I have participated in archaeological fieldwork in Italy and Turkey.

I shall be next on research leave in the Autumn semester 2021/22.

Expertise Summary

I specialise in ancient Mediterrenean art and archaeology and my main areas of expertise are:

  • Ancient Greek, Roman, Etruscan and Italic paintings and their modern reception
  • Art and archaeology of Magna Graecia
  • Art and archaeology of Iron Age Italy
  • Funerary art and archaeology
  • Collecting and trading of antiquities
  • Museology and public archaeology

Teaching Summary

I enjoy teaching a wide range of topics at all levels across Greek and Roman art and archaeology. At Nottingham, I have convened and taught modules on The World of the Etruscans, Greek and Roman… read more

Research Summary

I specialise in ancient Mediterranean art and archaeology, with a focus on Italy during the 1st millennium BC. My research agenda lies at the crossroads of art history, archaeology and cultural… read more

Recent Publications

  • D'ANGELO, T., 2021. Tra pietra e terracotta: materiali, tecniche e modelli della pittura funeraria in Italia meridionale. In: CIPRIANI, M., MANZO, G., SCELZA, F.U. and ZUCHTRIEGEL, G., eds., Le tombe dipinte di Paestum. Restauro, analisi, fruizione. (In Press.)
  • D'ANGELO, T., 2021. Review of Furlotti, B. Antiquities in Motion: From Excavation to Renaissance Collections (Los Angeles: Getty Research Institute, 2019) European Review of History: Revue européenne d'histoire. (In Press.)
  • D'ANGELO, T., 2020. Late Archaic funerary painting in Greek and native Apulia. In: MERIANI, A. and ZUCHTRIEGEL, G., eds., La Tomba del Tuffatore: Rito, arte e poesia a Paestum e nel Mediterraneo d’epoca tardo-arcaica Pisa: ETS. 133-174
  • D'ANGELO, T., 2020. Hybris and sophrosyne on the Amazon Sarcophagus from Tarquinia. In: BRUNI, S., ed., La mitologia figurata degli Etruschi. Nuove ricerche. Pisa: ETS. 91-109

I enjoy teaching a wide range of topics at all levels across Greek and Roman art and archaeology. At Nottingham, I have convened and taught modules on The World of the Etruscans, Greek and Roman Painting, Interpreting Ancient Art and Archaeology, and a Special Subject on "Otherness" in Classical Art. I also contribute to other undergraduate and postgraduate team-taught modules in the Department, including The Silk Road: Cultural Interactions and Perceptions, Great Discoveries in Archaeology, Greek and Roman Mythology, Roman Dining, Researching the Ancient World, Extended Source Study (worksheet on the Alexander Mosaic) and Studying Classical Scholarship (worksheet on Frank M. Snowden Jr. and Blacks in Antiquity).

I supervise undergraduate and postgraduate dissertations in ancient Mediterranean art and archaeology and their reception.

I became a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy in 2021.

Current Research

I specialise in ancient Mediterranean art and archaeology, with a focus on Italy during the 1st millennium BC. My research agenda lies at the crossroads of art history, archaeology and cultural history, and my publication record covers three major areas of research: 1) ancient Greek, Roman, Etruscan and Italic painting; 2) art and archaeology of Magna Graecia and pre-Roman Italy; 3) reception of classical art.

My research on ancient wall painting is concerned with both iconographic issues and technical questions related to the use of pigments and colour. I am also interested in the tension between 'Classical' and 'non-Classical' cultures across and beyond the Mediterranean and in the last few years I have been working on visual and material evidence of contact and interaction between native, Greek and Roman populations in southern Italy during the 1st millennium BC. My extensive experience in the museum world has allowed me to work on a number of collections of antiquities and I am especially interested in the development of the antiquities market in Europe and North America between the 18th and the 20th century.

My current book project, titled Colour, Death and Identity: Funerary Painting in Southern Italy, examines the cultural, political and artistic role of funerary wall painting in southern Italy between the 5th and 3rd centuries BC. I examine the paintings' contexts, iconography, stylistic features, and their use of colour, and I also address the broader question of how we can reconstruct the social and cultural identity of native communities in southern Italy and their interactions with the Greeks and the Romans. In particular, these tombs have allowed me to explore how local populations reacted to the crisis of Greek power and welcomed or resisted the military and cultural expansion of Rome.

I am also working with Professor Maya Muratov (Adelphi University / The Metropolitan Museum of Art) on a monograph that focuses on a private collection of ancient engraved gems assembled in the 19th century by Charles W. King, a Fellow of Trinity College Cambridge, and sold to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1881. This study looks at King's collection and his unpublished papers and reconstructs his multifaceted profile as a collector, scholar and amateur, with the purpose of shedding light on the changing attitudes towards collecting and the classical world in 19th-century Europe and North America.

Department of Classics and Archaeology

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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