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Claire Taylor

Associate Professor, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

  • 2002 University of Nottingham appointment.
  • 2001 part-time tutor contract at the University of Technology, Kingston, Jamaica.
  • 1999-2000 Research Associate, Centre for English Name Studies, School of English Studies, University of Nottingham.
  • 1995-2000 Part-time tutor, School of History, University of Nottingham;

Qualifications

  • BA Honours History (First Class) University of Nottingham 1994
  • MA Medieval History (Distinction) University of Nottingham 1995
  • PhD University of Nottingham (without corrections) 1999
  • PGCHE (with Commendation) 2006

Expertise Summary

I specialize and can supervise students in European history from the Tenth to the Thirteenth centuries. I am especially interested in;

  • Heresy and religious dissent from c.1000 to c.1300
  • Cathars
  • Waldensians
  • The Albigensian Crusade
  • The south-west of France: society, political life, economy and culture.
  • Inquisition against heresy
  • Medieval ideas about property

Teaching Summary

In my teaching I specialise in the exploration of popular heresy in the high middle ages, the crusades to c.1250, the economic and legal condition of medieval slaves and peasants, and the… read more

Research Summary

I am currently working specifically on medieval ideas of property and poverty and in the massacre of inquisitors at Avignonet in 1242.

Recent Publications

  • CLAIRE TAYLOR, 2019. Waldensians in Languedoc. In: Companions to the Christian Tradition: Waldensians Brill. (In Press.)
  • 2018. ‘Sunt quadraginta anni vel circa’: Southern French Waldensians and the Albigensian crusade’ French History. 32(3), 327-49
  • 2018. ‘The general court of the Agenais revisited: an innovation of the Albigensian Crusade’ Nottingham Medieval Studies. (In Press.)
  • 2016. ‘Looking for the ‘good men’ in Languedoc’. In: Cathars in Question Boydell & Brewer.

In my teaching I specialise in the exploration of popular heresy in the high middle ages, the crusades to c.1250, the economic and legal condition of medieval slaves and peasants, and the Mediterranean world. I also contribute to and convene team-taught undergraduate and postgraduate modules. I currently convene the Masters programme in Medieval Studies run by the Institute for Medieval Research (formerly the Institute for Medieval Studies). I am interested in how and why we study the past and have been involved with the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in improving our year one core module in this context.

Past Research

My past research has fallen into three overlapping categories.

i/ The history of South-Western France and the Plantagenet Empire, in particular its political and religious life. In addition to the article above on the Agenais and my two monographs below, which establish a strongly regional focus for discussing heresy, see the following articles and chapters.

2009. 'Royal protection in Aquitaine and Gascony by c.1000: the public, the private, and the princely'. In: LAMBERT, T. B. and ROLLASON, D., eds., Peace and Protection in the Middle Ages (Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Durham University), 36-59.

2007. 'Reform and the Basque dukes of Gascony: a context for the origins of the Peace of God and the murder of Abbo of Fleury', Early Medieval Europe 15(1), 35-52.

2003. 'The origins of the general court of the Agenais' Nottingham Medieval Studies. 47, 148-67.

1999. 'Innocent III, King John and the Albigensian Crusade (1209-1216)' In ED: Pope Innocent III and his World. (PUB)205-228.

ii/ The history of freedom and slavery/serfdom. This work resulted from a Leverhulme-funded international project into Slavery in which I was involved in a conference in Brazil (2004, p.i. was Prof. Dick Geary), which first interested me in economic approaches to the Middle Ages, but which I have yet had time to pursue except through teaching.

'From Slavery to 'unfreedom' in the western-european high middle ages', in Trabalho Livre/ Trabalho Escravo: Brasil e Europa, Seculos XVIII e XIX, eds. D.C. Libby and J.F. Furtado (Sao Paulo, Annablume 2006), 21-55.

2002. 'The year 1000 and 'those who laboured''. In: FRASSETTO, M., ed., The Year 1000: Religious and Social Response to the Turning of the First Millennium (Palgrave Macmillan). 187-236.

iii/ The history of popular heresy, in particular in South-Western France and 'dualist' heresy. This is the main work for which I am known. In addition to the items above on 'good men' and Waldensians and the sourcebook with LEGLU and RIST, the following fall under this heading…

2016. 'Looking for the 'good men' in Languedoc', in ed. A. Sennis, Cathars in Question. (Boydell & Brewer/York Medieval Press). This challenges some recent historiography concerning the nomenclature of heresy, using narrative and polemical sources, and was an invited paper at a historiographically significant conference on Cathar here.

  • Two well received monographs.

2011. Heresy, Crusade and Inquisition in Medieval Quercy (Boydell & Brewer/York Medieval Press).

2005. Heresy in medieval France: Dualism in Aquitaine and the Agenais, 1000-1249 (Boydell & Brewer/ Royal Historical Society).

These established me as a scholar with expertise in both Southern France and high-medieval heresy and popular religiosity. Having exploited not only all source genres but all of the extant sources available for the northern Languedoc specifically in this period - economic, political, clerical, cultural and legal; urban, rural, 'castral' and monastic; plains, river systems and highlands - they already give me a significant amount of transferable knowledge about the sorts of social and economic structures which exist in southern France more widely, and my knowledge of the types of sources available for unlocking them.

  • Five other significant and original articles and chapters

2013. 'Evidence for dualism in inquisitorial registers of the 1240s: a contribution to a debate' History, 98(331), 319-345. This was a response to a current debate concerning the origins of heretical beliefs, using witness testimonies.

2012. ''Heresy' in Quercy in the 1240s: authorities and audiences'. In: ANDREW ROACH, ed., Heresy and the Making of European Culture: Medieval and Modern Perspectives (Ashgate). 239-255. This concerned the authorial voices opresent in inquisition depositions.

2006. 'Elite reform and popular heresy in c.1000: "Revitalization Movements" as a model for understanding religious dissidence historically'. In: COOPER, K. and GREGORY J., eds., Elite and Popular Religion (Studies in Church History,vol. 42) Boydell & Brewer for The Ecclesiastical History Society. 41-53. This allowed me to pursue an interest in the psychology of transformative religiosity.

2005. 'Authority and the Cathar heresy in the northern Languedoc'. In: FRASSETTO, M., ed., The Origins of Heresy and Persecution in the Middle Ages: Essays on the Work of R. I. Moore (Brill). This explored structures of authority in northern Languedoc.

2000. 'The letter of Héribert of Périgord as a source for dualist heresy in the society of early eleventh-century Aquitaine' Journal of Medieval History. 26 (4), 313-349. This was my 'break-through' article, which attempted a post-revisionism concerning the geographical spread of dualist heresy.

Future Research

Apostolic Economics: Heresy and Property in Languedoc, c.1160-c.1300 CE

The major twelfth-century 'popular' religious heresies in western Europe - known as Catharism and Waldensianism - adopted an 'apostolic' lifestyle. That is to say, they rejected all property, whether held individually (like secular people) or collectively (like monks). They begged, in other words, living hand-to-mouth as a point of principle. However, this project suggests that from when they first entered southern France (Languedoc), they abandoned this practice and adopted a new approach because of some very specific local economic characteristics. The rise and fall of four significant forms of heterodox life are discussed in relation to their regional and Biblical influences. Through this, the nature of southern French society itself is illuminated, as are issues concerning heretical movements more widely.

  • CLAIRE TAYLOR, 2019. Waldensians in Languedoc. In: Companions to the Christian Tradition: Waldensians Brill. (In Press.)
  • 2018. ‘Sunt quadraginta anni vel circa’: Southern French Waldensians and the Albigensian crusade’ French History. 32(3), 327-49
  • 2018. ‘The general court of the Agenais revisited: an innovation of the Albigensian Crusade’ Nottingham Medieval Studies. (In Press.)
  • 2016. ‘Looking for the ‘good men’ in Languedoc’. In: Cathars in Question Boydell & Brewer.
  • TAYLOR, C., RIST, R. and LEGLU, C., 2013. The Cathars and the Albigensian Crusade: a sourcebook Routledge.
  • FITZGERALD, E., TAYLOR, C. and CRAVEN, M., 2013. To the castle! a comparison of two audio guides to enable public discovery of historical events Personal and Ubiquitous Computing. 17(4), 749-760
  • CLAIRE TAYLOR, 2012. 'Heresy' in Quercy in the 1240s: authorities and audiences. In: ANDREW ROACH, ed., Heresy and the making of European culture: medieval and modern perspectives Ashgate. 239-255
  • TAYLOR, C., 2011. Heresy, crusade and inquisition in medieval Quercy York Medieval Press.
  • TAYLOR, C., 2009. Royal protection in Aquitaine and Gascony by c.1000: the public, the private, and the princely. In: LAMBERT, T.B. and ROLLASON, D., eds., Peace and protection in the Middle Ages Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Durham University. 36-59
  • TAYLOR, C., 2006. Elite reform and popular heresy in c.1000: "revitalization movements" as a model for understanding religious dissidence historically. In: COOPER, K. and GREGORY J., eds., Elite and popular religion (Studies in Church History, vol. 42) Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer for The Ecclesiastical History Society. 41-53
  • TAYLOR, C., 2006. In: LIBBY, D.C. and FURTADO, J.F., eds., Trabalho Livre/ Trabalho Escravo: Brasil e Europa, Seculos XVIII e XIX Sao Paulo : Annablume. 21-55
  • TAYLOR, C., 2005. Heresy in medieval France: dualism in Aquitaine and the Agenais, 1000 -1249 London: Royal Historical Society.
  • TAYLOR, C., 2005. Authority and the Cathar heresy in the northern Languedoc. In: FRASSETTO, M., ed., The Origins of Heresy and Persecution in the Middle Ages: Essays on the Work of R. I. Moore Leiden : Brill.
  • TAYLOR, C., 2004. Susan M. Johns, Noblewomen, Aristocracy and Power in the Twelfth-Century Anglo-Norman Realm (Manchester, 2003); Bruce L. Venarde (translation and annotation), Robert of Arbrissel: A Medieval Religious Life (Washington DC, 2003); Conor McCarthy (ed.) Nottingham Medieval Studies. 48, 245-51
  • TAYLOR, C., 2004. Ceorl. In: PARSONS, D. and STYLES, T., eds., The Vocabulary of English Place-Names 3. Nottingham : Nottingham University Press.
  • TAYLOR, C., 2004. Christine de Pisan. In: PENNINGTON, R., ed., Amazons to Fighter Pilots: a Biographical Dictionary of Military Women Westport, CT : Greenwood Press. 95-8
  • TAYLOR, C., 2003. The origins of the general court of the Agenais Nottingham Medieval Studies. 47, 148-67
  • TAYLOR, C., 2002. The year 1000 and 'those who laboured'.. In: FRASSETTO, M., ed., The Year 1000: Religious and Social Response to the Turning of the First Millennium Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan. 187-236
  • TAYLOR, C., 1999. Innocent III, King John and the Albigensian Crusade (1209-1216) In: Pope Innocent III and his World. 205-228

Department of History

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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