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Daniel Hucker

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Arts

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Teaching Summary

In 2018/19, I will be convening my final year Special Subject Alternatives to War: Articulating Peace since 1815. In addition, I will be convening the first year survey module Roads to Modernity,… read more

Research Summary

My current research focuses on transnational networks of peace activists in the late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century. I am currently undertaking substantial archival research in the… read more

Recent Publications

In 2018/19, I will be convening my final year Special Subject Alternatives to War: Articulating Peace since 1815. In addition, I will be convening the first year survey module Roads to Modernity, co-convening the second year option V12265 British Foreign Policy and the Origins of the World Wars, 1895-1939, and convening the MA module Foreign Policy and Appeasement, 1933-9. I will also be contributing to the teaching of the core first year module Learning History, the core second-year module V12153 The Contemporary World since 1945, and an MA option on Global History.

Current Research

My current research focuses on transnational networks of peace activists in the late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century. I am currently undertaking substantial archival research in the UK, continental Europe and the United States as part of a British Academy funded project entitled '"The public opinion of the world": transnational citizen activism and diplomacy, 1890-1920'. Analysing the activities of several transnational organisations, including the International Peace Bureau, the Inter-Parliamentary Union, the Women's International League of Peace and Freedom, and The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, I will explore how peace was articulated, the projected role that an increasingly enlightened and international 'public sphere' would play, and hence the overall influence of public opinion on international affairs during this frenetic and challenging period of modern history.

Past Research

My previous research (and this is by no means completely dormant!) explored the influence of public opinion on the foreign policies pursued by Britain and France in the late 1930s. This research uses a conceptual notion of 'representations' in order to explore how certain dominant tendencies of public opinion assumed greater potency than others, and thus had a greater impact on the policymaking elites. Differentiating between 'residual' and 'reactive' representations of opinion, it illustrates how elite perceptions of public opinion evolved in the crucial period between the Munich Agreement and the outbreak of war in September 1939. A monograph, entitled Public Opinion and the End of Appeasement in Britain and France, was published by Ashgate in February 2011.

I am interested in supervising PhDs in topics that broadly correlate with my research interests, both past and present.

Future Research

My future research will continue to focus on public opinion, but specifically the notion of a 'global' or 'international' public opinion. In particular, I am keen to interrogate how conceptions of a genuinely international public opinion had gained such traction by 1919 as to underpin President Woodrow Wilson's projected League of Nations.

Department of History

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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