Department of History

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Sascha Auerbach

Associate Professor in Modern British and Colonial History, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

I am a historian of race, the state, and imperialism in the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. I was born in London, but did my degrees in the U.S. at Oberlin College (B.A.) and Emory University (M.A.,Ph.D.). Before coming to Nottingham, I held full-time posts in both the U.S. and Canada, most recently at the University of Northern British Columbia. I recently completed a year-long research sabbatical, supported by the Leverhulme Foundation. In the past, my work has also been supported by the US-UK Fulbright Commission, the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, and the Isaac Manasseh Meyer Fellowship (National University of Singapore). I am currently the Director of the Nottingham Institute for the Study of Slavery (ISOS), and the co-editor of the Cambridge University Press book series, "Histories of Slavery and its Global Legacies."

Expertise Summary

I am primarily a cultural historian, with a particular interest in the interaction between individual identity, structures of the state, and ideas about race and gender. My topics of study range from the history of local courtrooms in London's East End to slavery and indentured labour in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds. My current research examines the end of slavery in the British Empire, its long-term legacies, and their relationship to the modern state, Liberalism, and anti-colonial and humanitarian activism in modern Europe.

I can supervise undergraduate and postgraduate students with research interests in the following areas:

  • Late-stage slavery and its legacies in the nineteenth century
  • Chinese and Indian Labour Diasporas in the Nineteenth Century
  • Race and migration in the British Empire
  • Legal culture and gender in Britain and the Empire

I am currently supervising the following Ph.D. theses:

Elizabeth Egan (w/Prof. David Lambert, Warwick), "Constructing and Contesting Creole Whiteness in Jamaica, 1865-1938"

James Hulbert (w/ Prof. David Lambert, Warwick and Dr. Alex Korb, Leicester), "Before High Imperialism: Exploring the trans-imperial nature of British colonial violence in Australia, India and South Africa, 1857-1884"

I expect to be on research leave in the autumn of 2023.

Teaching Summary

Over the past twenty years, I have offered a wide array of modules at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. These have ranged from general histories of modern Europe to MA seminars on… read more

Research Summary

My third monograph, The Overseer State: Slavery, Indentured Labor, and Governance in the British Empire, 1812-1913, will be published next year in the "Critical Perspectives on Empire" series at… read more

Recent Publications

Over the past twenty years, I have offered a wide array of modules at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. These have ranged from general histories of modern Europe to MA seminars on postcolonial theory. Currently, my teaching focuses on the history and historiography of imperialism and colonialism in a global context. I am particularly interested in late-stage slavery and its legacies, the various ways by which colonialism was contested and resisted, and how the colonial encounter reshaped the theories and practices of the modern state.

Current Research

My third monograph, The Overseer State: Slavery, Indentured Labor, and Governance in the British Empire, 1812-1913, will be published next year in the "Critical Perspectives on Empire" series at Cambridge University Press. This book, the research for which was supported by a Leverhulme Research Fellowship, examines the transition from late-stage slavery to Indian and Chinese indentured labour in the nineteenth-century British Empire (esp. the Caribbean and Southeast Asia) and its historical significance in both the domestic and colonial contexts. By examining both the structural elements of colonial labour regimes and the more intimate social history of the African, Indian and Chinese labour diasporas, I hope to reconcile the established tradition of imperial political and economic history with the newer veins of cultural and postcolonial histories and to deepen our understanding of the historical relationship between the Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Past Research

My published scholarship has focused on race and immigration in British and British imperial society, and on the relationship between the state and the individual in modern society. My first book, Race, Law, and "the Chinese Puzzle" in Imperial Britain, was published in 2009. My second, Armed with Sword and Scales: Law, Culture, and Local Courtrooms in London, 1860-1913, was published in 2022 by Cambridge University Press. Later this year, my newest article, "Of Rights and Riots: Indenture and (Mis)Rule in the Late Nineteenth-Century British Caribbean," will appear in the English Historical Review. In addition, I have published research articles in a number of journals, including Law and History Review, 20th Century British History, the Journal of British Studies, The Historian, the Journal of Social History, and Comparative Studies in Society and History. My article in Law and History Review received Honorable Mention for the 2016 Sutherland Prize from the American Society for Legal History.

Future Research

I am currently developing three new research projects. The first looks at the material history of imperialism, especially how it relates to the historical agency of inanimate objects. The second examines how late-stage slavery and the post-slavery plantation economy in European empires helped catalyze new ideas and practices about public health. The third investigates the relationship between science, aesthetics and imperialism in the later nineteenth-century.

Department of History

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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