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A heart drug could significantly increase survival rates for children with an aggressive form of brain tumour, says new study

Tuesday, 16 July 2019

Researchers at the University of Nottingham have discovered that repurposing a heart drug could significantly increase the survival rate for children with ependymoma – a type of brain tumour.

 The findings, published in Scientific Reports and led by experts in the University’s Schools of Medicine and Life Sciences, suggest that co-treatment with a drug normally used to treat cardiac hypertrophy can overcome chemotherapy  resistance and increase survival in over a third of ependymoma patients.

 Ependymoma are the second most common malignant brain tumours in children. They can occur across all age groups, but the outcome for children is lower than in their adult counterpart. The poorest survival is seen in infants, with the five year prognosis at just 42-55%.

 The use of chemotherapy in children with ependymomas has had variable levels of success, leading to the frequent belief that ependymomas are chemoresistant tumours, since over half of tumours cannot be cured by chemotherapy alone.

The study was led by Dr Beth Coyle from the University of Nottingham’s School of Medicine and Dr Ian Kerr from the School of Life Sciences. The PhD student who undertook the research, Durgagauri Sabnis, was a recipient of a University of Nottingham Vice Chancellor’s Research Excellence Scholarship and the British Federation of Women Graduates (BFWG) foundation grant.

We are hopeful that by combining this repurposed drug with current treatments we can give new hope for long term survival to patients with these devastating brain tumours”.
Dr Beth Coyle from the University of Nottingham’s School of Medicine

In this study the authors set out to determine the nature of this chemoresistance. They show that, in patients treated with chemotherapy alone, the presence of a chemotherapy drug-pumping protein called ABCB1 was associated with a significantly poorer outcome.

Tumours that expressed ABCB1 were less likely to respond to chemotherapy and more likely to be locally invasive.

The authors then used a heart drug to inhibit ABCB1 function in cells taken from patient’s tumours. The heart drug was able to stop ABCB1 pumping chemotherapy drugs out of the tumour cells making them more sensitive to chemotherapy and less able to migrate.

ABCB1 is expressed in over one third of patient’s tumours, all of whom could potentially benefit from repurposing of this heart drug in future clinical trials.

A full copy of the report – ‘A role for ABCB1 in prognosis, invasion and drug resistance in ependymoma’ - can be found here.

Story credits

More information is available from Dr Beth Coyle from the University of Nottingham’s School of Medicine at beth.coyle@nottingham.ac.uk

Charlotte Anscombe - Media Relations Manager - Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences
Email: charlotte.anscombe@nottingham.ac.uk
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The University of Nottingham is a research-intensive university with a proud heritage, consistently ranked among the world's top 100. Studying at the University of Nottingham is a life-changing experience and we pride ourselves on unlocking the potential of our 44,000 students - Nottingham was named both Sports and International University of the Year in the  2019 Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide, was awarded gold in the TEF 2017 and features in the top 20 of all three major UK rankings. We have a pioneering spirit, expressed in the vision of our founder Sir Jesse Boot, which has seen us lead the way in establishing campuses in China and Malaysia - part of a globally connected network of education, research and industrial engagement. We are ranked eighth for research power in the UK according to REF 2014. We have six beacons of research excellence helping to transform lives and change the world; we are also a major employer, proud of our Athena SWAN silver award, and a key industry partner- locally and globally.

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