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Laura Grazia Di Stefano

PhD student, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

I graduated with a first-class honours Master degree in Medieval History from the University of Pisa. I did my master dissertation "Donne che vanno patrimoni che restano. Studio sulle strategie e alleanze matrimoniali nell'archivio della famiglia Salviati" at the Scuola Normale Superiore in Pisa after one year of research at the Salviati family's Archive. The thesis included the publication of private and unpublished papers of the Florentine family and it is currently available for consultation at the Archivio Salviati and the Archivio di Stato of Florence. I am currently a PhD student in Medieval History at the University Of Nottingham under the supervision of Dr Rob Lutton and Dr Ross Balzaretti. My research is funded by the University of Nottingham Vice-Chancellor's Scholarship for Research Excellence (European Union).

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Teaching Summary

I am seminar tutor on the first year history module 'Introduction to the Medieval World, 500-1500' for the Academic year 2016/2017

Research Summary

I am interested in the investigation of Venice's role as counterpart of Jerusalem in the peregrinatio ad loca sancta during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. My thesis "The business of… read more

Recent Publications

  • LAURA GRAZIA DI STEFANO, 2017. An Overlooked Manuscript of the Italian Mandeville Tradition: Florence, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, MS Ashburnham 1699, Viaggio di Giovanni Mandevilla tradotto in italiano Manuscripta. 61(1), 1-20 (In Press.)

Current Research

I am interested in the investigation of Venice's role as counterpart of Jerusalem in the peregrinatio ad loca sancta during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. My thesis "The business of pilgrimage in the fifteenth-century Venice" aims to assess the importance of the Venetian stage under two different perspectives. On the one hand, I am exploring the city evolution from simple port of departure to religious point of interest within the Holy Land pilgrimage. I am assessing not only the most important changes about the reception of pilgrims and administration of pilgrimage departures, but also in what way Venetians used the popularity of Venice as port of departure to build a well-structured religious "business" that included Venice's indulgences tours and dissemination of pilgrimage guides and maps. On the other hand, I am investigating how pilgrims perceived Venice in their writings and whether they may have been influenced by Italian culture or may have been aware of the complex bureaucratic structures created by Venetians for the administration of the Holy Land journeys.

Past Research

Through my academic career, I developed a great interest and a relevant experience in archival research, codicology, palaeography and manuscript studies in particular concerning the late medieval period. Indeed, great part of my research is based on the investigation of primary sources such as state papers produced by the Venetian Government, Venetian chronicles and pilgrimage narratives written between the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. In order to investigate the archival sources necessary for my research I spent the past year of my PhD doing research at the Archivio di Stato of Venice, the British Library, the Bodleian Library and the Eton College Archives

  • LAURA GRAZIA DI STEFANO, 2017. An Overlooked Manuscript of the Italian Mandeville Tradition: Florence, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, MS Ashburnham 1699, Viaggio di Giovanni Mandevilla tradotto in italiano Manuscripta. 61(1), 1-20 (In Press.)

Department of History

University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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