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Catalogue of the D.H. Lawrence Collection

George Lazarus Collection of literary papers and associated manuscripts

Contents - La Z 4-5

  • La Z 4 - Letters and postcards from D.H. and Frieda Lawrence to various correspondents; 1913-1933
  • La Z 5 - Correspondence of and between contemporaries of D.H. Lawrence; c.1911-1964
    • La Z 5/1 - Anne Estelle Rice to Cyril Beaumont
    • La Z 5/2 - John Galsworthy to James Pinker
    • La Z 5/3 - William Gerhardie to Nancy Pearn
    • La Z 5/4 - Edward Nehls to Rachel Annand Taylor
    • La Z 5/5 - Viola Meynell to Martin Secker
    • La Z 5/6 - Katherine Mansfield to Beatrice Campbell
    • La Z 5/7 - John Middleton Murry to Beatrice and Gordon Campbell
    • La Z 5/8 - Various correspondents
    • La Z 5/9 - to P. Beaumont Wadsworth
    • La Z 5/10 - to T.S. Mercer

The catalogue is in four parts, part one contains La Z 1, part two contains La Z 2-3, part three contains La Z 4-5 and part four contains La Z 6-14.

La Z 4 1913-1933 Letters and postcards from D.H. and Frieda Lawrence to various correspondents; 1913-1933

A collection of letters and postcards written by D.H. and Frieda Lawrence to a variety of recipients including Mary Cannan, Emily King, Charles Lahr, Martin Secker, James Pinker and Nancy Pearn, spanning a period from July 1913 to April 1933.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 4.

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La Z 4/1 1915-1923 Letters and postcards from D.H. Lawrence to Mary Cannan; 1915-1923

A collection of 21 letters and 1 postcard written by D.H. Lawrence to Mary Cannan between 24 February 1915 and April 1923.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 4/1.

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La Z 4/1/1 24.2.1915 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Greatham, Pulborough, Sussex to Mary [Cannan]; 24 Feb. 1915.

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; was glad to get her letter but asks why Gilbert [Cannan] did not put a word in; describes the days getting longer and the flowers and 'gaudy' birds, suggests she should visit him; [John Middleton] Murry has been staying and 'seems in much better spirit'; they have changed their 'island scheme' ['Rananim'] and he has decided that they must 'have a social revolution, after the war' where 'private ownership of land and industries and means of commerce shall be abolished' and 'every child born into the world shall have food and clothing and shelter as a birth-right'; they must form a revolutionary party; he has talked about it with various people including Bertrand Russell whom he is to stay with and 'go into it more thoroughly'.

Refers to the book he wrote ['Study of Thomas Hardy'], describing it as 'mostly philosophicalish, slightly about Hardy' and adds that he wants to re-write it and publish it in pamphlets; they must 'create an idea of a new, freer life' and asks her to tell Gilbert to 'roll his sleeves up for a fight with the cursed, tame Mammon we are saddled with'; they had E.M. Forster to stay, liked him but he is 'ridiculously inane'; Frieda is sad because her father has died and they both have bad colds; asks that she bring the typewriter and the half dozen knives they left behind; sends love to both from both; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'

Frieda adds a note, written at the beginning of the letter; they forgot 2 books and would 'be glad of them'; Lady O[ttoline] left this morning and was 'also sad but nice'.

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La Z 4/1/2 24.12.1915 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, c/o Mrs Clarke, Grosvenor Rd, Ripley, Derbyshire to Mary Cannan; 24 Dec. 1915.

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; was glad to get her letter and to know she is no longer 'cross' with him; the flat is gone and their furniture packed, so he feels 'free and mobile' and is glad; they are staying with his 2 sisters [Ada Clarke and Emily King] and it is 'terrible ... to turn back into the past'; they are going to Cornwall to the Beresford's house but are not putting off Florida forever, will certainly go before the summer is out and form 'a little Community'; it is what he wants, 'a new Creative unanimous life'; is having some bulbs sent for her rockery, hopes they will grow; sends love to her and Gilbert [Cannan] from himself and Frieda; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/1/3 14.6.1918 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Mountain Cottage, Middleton by Wirksworth, Derby to Mary Cannan; 14 Jun. 1918.

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; comments that he has not seen her 'nor written hardly' since she came to Greatham [March 1915]; has heard about Gilbert [Cannan, Mary Cannan broke with him Feb. 1918 because of his adulterous affair with Gwen Wilson], 'very wretched'; remarks that they had some 'jolly times at Cholesbury' but he cannot think of the mill now 'without pain'; wonders whether 'Binky' [Felix, Gilbert Cannan's brother] 'stuck to' her.

They [Lawrence and Frieda] have had their 'ups and downs'; the Police raided their house in Cornwall and they are under police suspicion for no reason; he makes hardly any money and his sister [Ada Clarke] has taken this cottage for them, near to his 'native place' and 'very beautiful'; asks if she will come and visit.

Charles Whibley got the 'Royal Literary Society - or Royal Literary Fund' to send him application forms for help and he fills them in 'with a black and angry heart'; asks whether she could speak to [Alfred] Sutro 'to vote or speak for me when the occasion of a grant ... comes up'; they have lived for months 'from shilling to shilling - and a £10 from [Montague] She[a]rman'; adds that there is no point 'trying to write selling stuff, in this state of affairs'.

Reminisces on times he spent with her and Gilbert and believes 'there was something in those still days, before the war had gone into us, that was beautiful and generous'; perhaps they will be happy again; thinks Gilbert has let her down 'unpardonably'; asks if she remembers their 'island scheme' ['Rananim']; sends Frieda's love and his own; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/1/4 22.11.1920 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Fontana Vecchia to Mary Cannan; 11 Nov. 1920.

Addresses her as 'Dear Mary'; was 'a bit cross' with her and her money but 'tout passe'; they [Lawrence and Frieda] are 'marooned like sailors' [in Taormina, Sicily]; [Robert H.] Kitson has been for tea 'and once a French woman - otherwise, dead silence'; have had the 'awfulest weather', 'great guns of wind' and have 'sat in the big rooms with a good fire and felt like Noah in the ark'; the 'Taorminesi natives' are as 'mean and creeping as ever'; gives the exchange rate and doubts it will improve, advises she change [money] into French 'if there is a momentary improvement'; doubts she will want to come again to Italy 'things being as they are'.

Is glad she likes France, Réné Hansard said it was 'much better to live in'; [Jan] Juta and [Alan] Insole 'are not agreeing very well' and Insole has 'dashed to Tunis'; he [Lawrence] is not going to Capri; adds that 'libraries objected' to p 256 of 'Lost Girl' so he re-wrote it for [Martin] Secker's sake; is 'doing no serious work, but painting a picture'; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/1/5 12.12.1920 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Fontana Vecchia, Taormina, Sicilia to Mary Cannan; Sunday 12 Dec. 1920.

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; things have brightened up and it is 'quite warm'; they have 'suddenly dashed into society - or been popped in by [Robert] Kitson'; discusses their social activities and some of the people they have met including Rosalie Bull 'a theosophist', Baron Stempl and Mrs Leader Williams 'from your palace - where they sell things at home'; gives news of [Alan] Insole and Kitson; talks about their 'good oven' and lists some of the things he has cooked; Taormina is amusing and he is 'cogitating' on whether to keep the house for another year or go 'to the wilds of Sardinia'; their salotta is 'very cosy' and he supposes she will 'be trotting back'; hopes she received the 'Christmas hanky'; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/1/6 12.2.1921 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Fontana Vecchia, Taormina, Sicily to Mary Cannan; Saturday 2 Feb. n.y. [1921].

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; comments on [John Middleton] Murry's 'mitigated downfall' [from the Athenaeum] and refers to the review in the Nation of K[atherine Mansfield]'s book ['Bliss and Other Stories']; asks that Cannan 'spit on her for me' as 'she's a liar out and out'; mentions the Athanaeum's loss of £5000 a year under Murry's [editorship] and describes him and [Katherine Mansfield] as 'Vermin'.

Does not approve of her gambling and has little news himself; [Marie] Hubrecht may come in April; 'Lost Girl' has sold only 2,300 and Secker owes him £15; Secker is 'going to do 'Women in Love' without altering it' and offers him [Lawrence] £75; is sending her his 'famous picture' ['Lorenzetti']; she can take it 'as a sop to Cerberus ... for now comes the demand'; asks if she can lend him £200 for his plan to go to the Thrasher farm '4 hours from New York, 2 hours from Boston'; thinks it feasible to work the farm and suggests she could come too and 'have a little farm house of your own and take over one branch of the work'; it is only a 'tentative' request and he will not mind what her answer is.

Has nearly done 'a little travel book' 'Diary of a Trip to Sardinia'; comments on H.G. Wells going to join Rebecca West who is in Capri with Mrs Compton Mackenzie; Réné Hansard has bought a farm near Cannes and 'is going to make her fortune growing tube-roses, and inventing miracles at the well in the fields'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'; a note added by the address reads 'please do not mention the America plan to people, especially murry-worms'.

Date: the letter has been annotated in pencil in an unknown hand with '1921'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 3, p. 663 gives the year 1921.

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La Z 4/1/7 24.2.1921 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Fontana Vecchia, Taormina, Sicilia to Mary Cannan; 24 Feb. 1921

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; he is exited that she can let him 'have the money' (see La Z 4/1/6) and they have heard from Mrs Thrasher that they can have the farm although 'the house will be in ruins'; describes 'the rage' with which they make plans and outlines these plans for the farm; wants her to come next spring and 'take over one branch of the industry ... perhaps strawberries and bees and jam'; asks what she has done with her Italian money and adds that it is not 'worth keeping, with the exchange now constant at 105-106'; suggests she give them some Liras to save 'changing the bit of English'.

Describes her and Molly Muirs ignorance of the 'early Christian Church' as 'wicked' and goes on to explain the 'Thebaïd'; was amused about the 'Pug and the Peacock' [by Gilbert Cannan] and adds that Gilbert is 'no doubt doing a bit of swank'; Mrs Thrasher may take Fontana Vecchia when they leave; still does not like her [Mary Cannan] gambling and advises her not to let it become 'a habit'; describes the cold weather and adds that they sometimes go to the Studio but 'there is your ghost there, and your absence'; asks about getting 'a berth in a cargo ship? - to go to America'; supposes he will go to England to see his sisters and 'have some clothes'; sends love from them both; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/1/8 15.3.1921 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Fontana Vecchia, Taormina, Sicilia to Mary Cannan; 15 Mar. 1921

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; has just accompanied Frieda to Palermo from where she is travelling to see her mother in Baden-Baden; he will stay in [Taormina, Sicily] as 'with one thing and another' he cannot 'manage' his plan [for the farm in Connecticut, U.S.A.]; returns her cheque with thanks and corrects her plural of thousand from 'mille' to 'mila'; a 'Scotch-woman - a Miss [Millicent] Beveridge' is painting his portrait; describes Sicily on his return the previous day as 'lovely' and he is taking Fontana Vecchia for another year; remarks that he 'disbelieves' the Murrys [John Middleton Murry and Katherine Mansfield]; everyone is 'in giro' and mentions that [Jan] Juta met Ottoline and Julian [Morrell] in Rome and [Alan] Insole is 'on his way to Japan'; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/1/9 26.3.1921 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Taormina to Mary Cannan; Saturday n.d. [26 Mar. 1921]

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; thinks he will leave on April 15th and go walking in Sardinia with [Jan] Juta; he has been hating Taormina but 'one hates everywhere in fits and starts'; will send her a photograph of the portrait painted by Miss [Millicent] Beveridge; has 2 copies of the 'American de-luxe edition of Women in Love' and will send her a copy although she will probably 'hate the inside'; Ottoline [Morrell] 'left Juta in the cold' and is having her portrait painted by Eric Gill, 'the fat-hipped soft fellow we saw at Anticoli last year'; the season has been very wet, 'hence very green'; would like to visit her in September and does not think he will go to England; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter is undated and has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with 'March or April 1921'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 3, p. 694 gives the date as 26 March 1921 based on references to the Millicent Beveridge portrait of D.H. Lawrence.

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La Z 4/1/10 2.5.1921 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Ludwig-Wilhelmstift, Baden-Baden, Germany to Mary Cannan; 2 May 1921

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; wonders where she is and whether she received the 'de luxe edition of Women in Love'; he is with Frieda in a country inn 3 miles outside Baden-Baden; describes Baden as 'a lovely little town', the food is good and the travelling 'clean and easy'; Frieda's mother 'is a good bit better, but has sudden relapses' and they must hire a nurse; they may go to Bavaria in July and then to Austria and back to Taormina [Sicily] in August; Frieda's brother-in-law [Edgar Jaffe] has died; is trying to 'go on' with his 'Aaron's Rod' novel but does not know if he is 'going to succeed'; describes Germany as 'rather depressed and empty feeling' and asks whether they will see her this summer; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/1/11 4.7.1921 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Krone, Ebersteinburg, BadenBaden to Mary Cannan; 4 Jul. 1921

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; he had not heard about the boy drowning [Michael L. Davies] and adds that 'J.M. [Barrie] has a fatal touch for those he loves'; he is impatient to leave [Baden-Baden] and gives details of their proposed journey from Freiburg to Zell-am-See where they may stay 'some weeks'; otherwise they may go south to Florence and stay in Miss [Nellie] Morrison's flat; does not want to go to Taormina for 'another winter'; he has finished 'Aaron's Rod' but she will 'like it in bits only'; [Jan] Juta has 'done really clever illustrations for the 'Sardinia' book'; his mother-in-law has returned to the [Ludwig-Wilhelm]stift and his sister-in-law and her children are with them, they are nice but 'relations are a mistake'.

Robert Mountiser is due tomorrow and is 'perfectly crazy to have a small yacht and go round the world'; when they 'bring it off' she should come 'for a trip'; he would like to 'break out of Europe' as it has been 'a bad meal of various courses'; [Alan] Insole has written that Japan is 'perfectly fascinating' and he would like to see it.

He is supposed to write 'A History of Painting, for Children' but does not know if he will get it done; Réné Hansard 'has had to go to her farm' and has to sell her Chelsea home as Lukey [Hansard] has 'muddled the banking accounts'; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/1/12 5.12.1921 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Fontana Vecchia, Taormina, Sicilia to Mary Cannan; Monday 5 Dec. n.y. [1921]

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; comments on her going to Honolulu and Canada; discusses his plan to go to Taos, New Mexico 'a little town with a tribe of aboriginal Indians' and asks her not to tell anybody as 'one plans so many things'; if he does not like Taos he will go to 'real Mexico'; advises her to 'seize a good moment and sell your Italian Liras' and describes Italy as 'sickening, and such a muddle ever increasing'; they see the 'usual crowd' and he is 'bored really by all the triviality'; [Jan] Juta's 'Bettina' [Elizabeth Humes] and her mother are there, Juta and [Alan] Insole are in South Africa and Juta wants to come to Mexico in March and do a book with him; comments on the weather and sends love from F[rieda]; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

Date: Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 4, p. 142 gives the years as 1921.

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La Z 4/1/13 11.1.1922 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Fontana Vecchia, Taormina, Sicily to Mary Cannan; 11 Jan. 1922

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; is sending her 'Sea and Sardinia' and 'Secker is bargaining with Seltzer for 1000 sheets, for an English edition'; the pictures have 'come out pretty well' although 'the reds are poor'; they heard that [Jan] Juta has hurt his leg and it may be serious, hopes it is not; hopes to leave [for Taos, New Mexico] in February but does not want to sail to New York; has had 'flu but feels better; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/1/14 27.1.1922 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Fontana Vecchia, Taormina, Sicily to Mary Cannan; 27 Jan. 1922

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; he has 'balked at America' and is going instead to Ceylon; discusses the journey and cost which turns his 'bones to water' but he 'must go out of Europe now'; they will join the Brewsters near Kandy, [Earl Henry Brewster] is 'studying with the Buddhist monks'; later they will go to China and then to New Mexico 'but not yet', 'postpone the evil day'; if she really wants to send him something he would like a fountain pen, one that 'really flows without flooding'; adds that he still has a 'stump of pencil' which she gave him at Cholesbury; encourages her to go to Spain; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/1/15 12.2.1922 (c) Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Fontana Vecchia, Taormina, Sicilia to Mary Cannan; Sunday n.d. [c.12 Feb. 1922]

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; thanks her for the pen and seal she has sent and hopes the seal stays with him to 'seal all my affairs of state and solemnity'; he is translating a Sicilian novel 'Mastro-don Gesualdo' by Giovanni Verga, it is 'so good'; has sent the deposit for berths on the 'Osterley' to sail in 2 weeks [for Ceylon] from Naples; the 'thought of going' gives him a 'sinking feeling', 'the wrench of breaking off' but imagines himself 'sitting draped in a sheet, cross-legged and smiling at my own pancia' a fortnight after reaching Ceylon.

Urges her not to 'talk about goodbyes' and she should think of seeing him and Frieda in Colombo 'in pith helmets and black goggles'; quotes 2 lines from a hymn ['From Greenland's Icy Mountains' by Bishop Reginald Heber]; thinks the Austrian Tyrol 'lovely' but 'depressing' and Spain should be 'more fun'; Albert Stopford, 'the man who made some sort of scandal', is there [in Taormina]; he [Lawrence] did a 'Memoir' of Maurice Magnus 'for the front of his horrid 'Legion' book', will send it her; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter is undated and has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with 'Feb 1922'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 4, p. 190 dates the letter 12? February 1922.

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La Z 4/1/16 28.2.1922 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, R.M.S. 'Osterely' to Mary Cannan; Tuesday 28 Feb. n.y. [1922]

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; gives news of their journey and the ship, 'like a luxurious hotel this second class'; is glad to leave Italy as 'it has become a hateful country' and it is 'more shaky than ever'; advises she transfer her 5000 [Lira] out of the Banca di Sconto; bids 'a rivederci'; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter is has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with '1922'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 4, p. 203 gives the year as 1922.

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La Z 4/1/17 3.4.1922 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Ardnaree, Lade View Estate, Kandy, Ceylon to Mary Cannan; 3 Apr. 1922.

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; they have been in Ceylon 3 weeks; describes the weather, the landscape and the 'native life'; 'the east ... seems silly' and he does not 'like it one bit'; does not like the 'silly dark people or their swarming billions or their hideous little Buddha temples, like decked up pigsties'; advises her not to travel there but to take a house 'somewhere quiet' and invite them to stay with her; adds that 'one only goes further and fares worse'.

They saw the Prince of Wales [later Edward VIII] and the 'Perahera'; the prince 'sat perfectly still, expressionless and ghastly' and 'would hardly open his mouth to anybody' but the 'procession of elephants and princes and devil-dancers and torch flames' was 'wonderful'; the Brewsters and the bungalow are 'nice' but he hopes to leave soon and perhaps go to Australia; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/1/18 5.4.1922 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Ardnaree, Kandy to Mary Cannan; 5 Apr. n.y. [1922].

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; describes the tropics as 'beautiful in a lush, tangled, tousled, lousy sort of way' and the 'natives' are 'good looking, dark-skinned and erect'; discusses the tropical fruit, which he cannot eat; plans to leave for West Australia in 3 weeks; advises her not to travel and adds that he feels 'perfectly reckless' and will satisfy himself as to what he wants; gives an address in Perth [Australia] but adds that he will probably be sent home to England 'sooner and surer than anything ever would'; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with '1922'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 4, p. 224 gives the year as 1922.

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La Z 4/1/19 31.8.1922 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, R.M.S. Tahiti to Mary Cannan; 31 Aug. 1922

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; describes the 21 days on board the [R.M.S. Tahiti] with 'everyone getting very nervy and on edge'; they stopped for a day at Rarotonga and 2 days at Tahiti but he never wants 'to stay in the tropics'; will be glad to arrive in San Francisco as 'to be alone, and to be still, is one of the greatest blessings'; travel is a 'splendid lesson in disillusion'; at Tahiti they 'took on [board] a crowd of cinema people' who had been making the film 'Captain Blackbird' [released as 'Lost and Found in A South Sea Island' by Goldwyn Pictures Feb. 1923], describes them as 'undistinguished'; he is glad [Robert] Mountsier sold a story of his for $1000 ['Lost Girl' to Hearst's International]; thinks he will come to England in spring and may return to Taormina [Sicily]; F[rieda] sends love; signed 'D.H.L.'

The letter is written on 'R.M.S. Tahiti' headed notepaper; the content of the letter indicates that the letter is written on landing in the U.S.A. although possibly still on board the ship; a precise location is not clear but the letter is written several days prior to arrival in San Francisco (4 September 1922).

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La Z 4/1/20 27.9.1922 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Taos, New Mexico, U.S.A. to Mary Cannan; 27 Sep. 1922

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; describes San Francisco as 'not unpleasant' but it made 'no great impression'; they are in Taos now and have 'a very pretty 'adobe' house, just on the edge of the Indian reservation' built by Mabel Sterne; describes the house and the surrounding 'desert' and the 'queer' Indian village 3 miles away; Mabel Sterne is 'very generous' and is living with Toni, 'one of her Indians'.

They are kept busy 'being driven out in the car over the desert to wild places'; they are also learning to 'ride horseback' which is 'great fun' if 'a bit tiring'; [America] is an experience but whether he 'really' likes it is 'another matter'; thanks her for offering to lend him money but he has £500 and is 'in a position to lend, instead of borrowing'; they plan to stay in America over winter and to come to England in April although he still feels 'angry against it'; hopes she enjoys her trip to Italy and adds that Gilbert [Cannan] has 'lapsed into the land of ghosts' in his [Lawrence's] soul; sends love from F[rieda]; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/1/21 5.12.1922 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Del Monte Ranch, Questa, New Mexico, U.S.A. to Mary Cannan; 5 Dec. 1922

Addresses her as 'My dear Mary'; they are now settled 17 miles from Taos in 'an old log cabin ... on this ranch in the foothills'; they go riding and 'it is very beautiful' but 'America is not a sympathetic country'; he does not like the people, likes the 'Mexicans better'; receives many invitations to lecture in New York but will not go; is sending her a copy of 'England, my England'; tells her about his 'Australian novel' 'Kangaroo' and adds that 'Women in Love' has 'a pretty good sale over here'.

He still receives 'feeble' letters from the 'Taorminesi', 'they say no forestieri in Italy' and he supposes 'too much fascisti'; has heard from Ottoline [Morrell] and has seen that [John Middleton] Murry 'boosts' him 'patronisingly' [in a review of 'Aaron's Rod' in Nation and Athenaeum]; refers to comments by Gilbert [Cannan] that he [Lawrence] is 'useless' when he does people; America 'makes one feel one has swallowed a rather big pebble'; send love from F[rieda] and himself; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/1/22 12.4.1923 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Monte Carlo, Avenue Uruguay 69, Mexico City to Mary Cannan; 12 Apr. 1923.

He likes Mexico better the longer he stays and is tomorrow going to Puebla, then to Tehuacan and Orizaba; may take a house here; he is 'getting tired of travel' but when he tries to come to England something in him 'resists always'; refers to the picture on the verso, 'the third young man is a young Amer. friend [Willard Johnson] - the others the two Mexican chauffeurs'; asks if she is 'sitting good and still'; signed 'D.H.L.'

The card is addressed to 'Mary Cannan, 42 Queens Gardens, Hyd[e Park], L[ondo]n; it bears a red 1.5d stamp and a brown 10 centavos stamp and is postmarked 'Mexico D.F. 12 ABR 1923'; the verso of the postcard is a photograph of Frieda Lawrence, D.H. Lawrence, Willard Johnson and 2 Mexican Chauffeurs.

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La Z 4/2 1924-1964 Letters from D.H. Lawrence to Rolf Gardiner and publications of Rolf Gardiner; 1924-1928, 1960, 1964

A collection of 19 letters and 2 postcards written by D.H. Lawrence to Rolf Gardiner between July 1924 and December 1928; also included are two publications by Rolf Gardiner from the 1960s.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 4/2.

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La Z 4/2/1 4.7.1924 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Del Monte Ranch, Questa, New Mexico, to Rolf Gardiner; 4 Jul. 1924.

Replies to his letter explaining that he would have done a notice of 'Harbottle' ['A Modern Pilgrim's Progress from This World to That Which is to Come' by John Gordon Hargrave], but it is now too late; expresses an interest in the book; declares himself sick of the 'farce of cosmic unity, or world unison' which may exist in the abstract only but not elsewhere; goes on to expand on this theme: 'The spirit of place ultimately always triumphs'; is also 'sick to death' of the 'Jewish monotheistic string' and prefers the 'pagan many gods and the animistic vision'; reflects on the effect on him of living on the ranch at the foot of the Rockies and mixing with the Indians: 'what is it to me, world unison and peace and all that'; describes himself as 'essentially a fighter' and thus to wish him peace is bad luck.

Cites the diverse places he has known that may never be unified; likens man to the different species of wild animals who all live in the hills around them 'in the unison of avoiding one another'; explains that to him life is to feel the 'white ideas and the "oneness" crumbling into a thousand pieces, and all sorts of wonder coming through'; although he cares little for 'all that stuff', is glad if 'White Fox and his K.K'ers' have a good time [Hargrave's title 'White Fox, Headman K.K.']; accepts the need to return to the older version of life but not for the sake of unison nor done from the 'will'; there should instead be a great yielding; advises him not to bother but accept what seems good and reject what seems repulsive; concludes 'To hell with stunts - when they cease to amuse'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/1.

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La Z 4/2/2 9.8.1924 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Del Monte Ranch, Questa, New Mexico, USA, to Rolf Gardiner; 9 Aug. 1924.

Gives a vigorous opinion of 'Harbottle' [by John Gordon Hargrave], describing it as 'poor stuff: snivelling self-pity ... a nice little upholstered nest of essential cowardice'; suggests if Gardiner ever edits another paper [Youth - with article by Gardiner 'Youth and Europe'] he should take up a 'hatchet, not a dummy test of commiseration'; expresses in strong terms his contempt for the 'blasted snivel of hopelessness and self-pity' and urges instead 'courage...fresh air, and not suffused sentiments'; continues by insisting that if it's going to be Youth then let it be 'Youth on the war path, not wandervogeling and piping imitation nature tunes'; forcefully states that if there be any youth in Europe they should not 'snivel or feel hopeless' but wage war 'smashing the face of what one knows is rotten'.

[John Middleton] Murry had urged him the previous year to come and do what he liked with the Adelphi; when he had, 'he went green at my first article' ['On Coming Home'] and would not print it, fearful that 'Lorenzo' would only make enemies; Lawrence asserts this is just what he wants - but is not going to make an enemy of Murry; salutes Gardiner and his 'bygone Youth'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/2.

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La Z 4/2/3 17.7.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, c/o Frau von Richthofen, Ludwig Wilhelmstift, Baden Baden, to Rolf Gardiner; 17 Jul. 1926.

Acknowledges with pleasure the circular letter, which showed him that 'Youth [publication] efforts' had not gone 'entirely to the wall'; agrees that one must look to the Northern peoples for 'real guts and self-responsibility'; admits that having spent time in Italy and in France he is a 'bit bored by the Latins' with their 'sort of inner helplessness and lack of courage', willingness to deceive themselves, with their only alternative emigration to America; expects to be in England in August and suggests a meeting to hear all about the 'new grouping'; advises him not to be too 'ernest - earnest - how does one spell it?' but simple and direct, and a 'bit free from oneself above all'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/3.

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La Z 4/2/4 22.7.1926 (c) Letter from D H Lawrence, c/o Frau von Richthofen, Ludwig Wilhelmstift, Baden Baden, to Rolf Gardiner; Thursday n.d. [22 Jul. 1926].

Describes [Gardiner's] last letter as 'like a bluster in the weather. I am holding my hat on'; is keen to meet and gives his address in Chelsea from July 30; plans to spend time with his sisters on the Lincolnshire coast and also to visit Scotland; believes they are mutually scared 'I of weird movements, and you of me'; however wants them to meet when he will ask questions of Gardiner like a doctor of a previously unknown patient; would like to visit Yorkshire and even to try to dance a sword-dance with 'iron-stone miners above Whitby'; would love to be connected with some few people in something and regrets having always been very much alone in anything that matters; as such, if there is, with him, an activity he can belong to, will be thankful but very wary of committing himself.

Declares he will be very glad to abandon his 'rather meaningless isolation' and join with some few other men if he can; wishes it were possible in the 'dirty solution of this world' for some 'new little crystal' to form; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

Date: This letter clearly follows that written to Gardiner on 17 July and before expected arrival date of 30 July.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/4.

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La Z 4/2/5 30.7.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, 25 Rossetti Garden Mansions, Flood Street, Chelsea, S.W.3, to Rolf Gardiner; 'Friday night' n.d. [30 Jul. 1926].

Invites him to lunch the following Tuesday in their top floor flat which belongs to Mrs Stanley Fay; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

Date: Earlier letter (La Z 4/2/4) states date of arrival at the address would be 30 July.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/5.

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La Z 4/2/6 14.8.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, [Bailabladon, Newtonmore, Inverness-shire], to Rolf Gardiner; 14 Aug. 1926.

Will arrive at the beginning of the week; finds Scotland rather damp and 'somewhat obscured by tourists'; considers it too northern for him 'one shrinks a little inside one's skin'; has to spend eight or nine days with his sisters in Mablethorpe and wants to be in London by 26 [August]; thus has no time to stop off in Yorkshire and doubts if he could face a country house party anyway; will have to postpone their meeting and adds 'It's a case of Schöpferische Pause all round'; thanks him for the book [a work of educational theory written by Fritz Klatt]; reflects 'the only danger is lest the pause should be too long. It's a grey human twilight, for the time being'.

Expects to leave in four or five days and go straight to Lincolnshire; wonders if he might care to join him but suggests it will be 'horrid - and more family'; exclaims in Italian that they are all slaves; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/6.

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La Z 4/2/7 12.9.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Sutton-on-Sea, to Rolf Gardiner; 12 Sep. 1926.

Mentions that he returned 'Schöpferische Pause' [by Fritz Klatt] the previous day; was interested to read it but the 'school-master part' bored him; comments that school-masters are terribly important to themselves but supposes they have to be; will be leaving the next day and gives his London address in Hampstead where he expects to be by Thursday; suggests meeting if Gardiner is in town; feels the 'whole thing is a Pause just now. Let's hope it's Schöpferische'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/7.

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La Z 4/2/8 11.10.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Miranda, Scandicci, Florence, Italy, to Rolf Gardiner; 11 Oct. 1926.

They returned to Villa Mirenda because they were tired of feeling 'cooped up' in London; remarks on the summer-like weather and the spacious house; wonders what his singing tour was like and also what the Schleswig camp will be like; is fundamentally sympathetic but finds it hard to get 'anything real going'; accepts that until there is a 'tangible desire' for a new sort of relationship, between people, one is bound to beat about the bush; recognises it is difficult not to 'fall into precocity and a sort of faddism'; describes his vision of a new way of life somewhere in the country where one might 'slowly evolve a new rhythm of life'; expands on the need, and the means, to establish a 'fuller relationship between oneself and the universe and between oneself and ones fellow man and fellow woman'.

Suggests they think about it and make a start but not rush into anything; says one can become the 'focus, or mode' of a new sensibility' if one is sensible; asks again about the Schleswig camp; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/8.

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La Z 4/2/9 3.12.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence, to Rolf Gardiner; 3 Dec. 1926.

Refers to his letter and the 'Baltic meeting' which to him sounds a bit dreary, although the song-tour sounded splendid; approves of what he is doing with 'hikes and dances and songs' but there needs to be a 'centre of silence, and a heart of darkness - to borrow from Rider Haggard' [Sir Henry, 1856-1925]; develops at length his own ideas for establishing a centre of activities in England 'some quiet house in the country...with a big barn and a bit of land' where one would acquire a deep discipline, learn dances from all the world and different sorts of music, and also possibly work a small farm; is relying on him to be the organiser of the activities, knowing nothing himself about dances and folk music; considers it essential this way of life includes 'at least earning one's bread'.

Will not be coming to England for [production of] 'Widowing of Mrs Holroyd'; hates journeys and has to take care as his health is 'always risky'; mention of Hucknall Torkard and the miners evokes happy memories of times in his youth walking to Watnall and haymaking in the fields which were hired by 'Miriam's father' [Jessie Chambers' father]; if in the district again suggests he visits Eastwood his birthplace and home for 21 years; gives a suggested detailed itinerary which takes in houses he has lived in, Felley Mill (setting for 'White Peacock') and through to Annesley 'the country of my heart'; from there he will see Miriam's farm [Haggs Farm] where he got his first incentive to write; will go there with him some day.

Mentions having visited his sister [Ada Clarke] in September during the miners' strike - a sight which was 'like a spear through one's heart'; if he is anywhere near Ripley, six miles by tram-car from Eastwood, suggests he visit his sister and her husband who has a tailor's shop; describes them as having 'got on' so have a new house and a car 'but they're nice'; also recommends two hiking routes in Nottinghamshire and in Derbyshire 'the hard pith of England'; will walk it with him one day; asks for his opinion of 'Mrs Holroyd' if he sees it; will come to England in mid-February if 'David' is produced in mid-March; asks him to keep the idea of a 'centre' in mind and to look for a house 'not dear, because I don't make much money' but something they could build up; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

Identifies 'Mrs Holroyd' as his aunt [Mary Ellen, married to his uncle James Lawrence] who lived in a tiny cottage near Brinsley railway-crossing; mentions that his father was born in the cottage in the quarry hole by the level crossing; recommends a nice path from there to Eastwood or Moorgreen.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/9.

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La Z 4/2/10 11.7.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence, to Rolf Gardiner; 11 Jul. 1927.

Thanks him for the Camp report which is amusing and to a novelist 'the thing interesting'; gives his opinion of the German 'acute sense of their nationality' but apart from that describes them as 'lustig' [merry, lively] which the English never are; nor are the latter capable of mass-movement like the Germans; predicts the English will never follow, except for fun but thinks there is nothing wrong in his trying; will be interested to hear what he makes of his 'centre' when he starts it; seems to him a 'little ark somewhere in a quiet place' will be valuable; does not think they will come to England that summer; will be leaving soon for a place in Carinthia, then September in the Isartal near Munich, followed by Baden and then back there; so will not be able to come to the Cheviots.

Would really like to come to one of his meetings, but as an outsider, 'not too strenuous'; his health is very tiresome lately; wishes him luck; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'. In a postscript asks what [Georg] Götsch is by blood, German, Jew or Scandinavian; comments that his camp sounded a 'wee bit like going to prison' for two weeks 'hard'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/10.

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La Z 4/2/11 18.12.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence, to Rolf Gardiner; 18 Dec. 1927.

Enquires if his last letter annoyed him, as he has not answered it; asks that he continue to write and tell him what he is doing as he is always interested even if a 'Job's Comforter'; his own 'tiresome bronchials' exasperate him but they are now better; if Gardiner could 'revive the old round dances and singing among the men of the mines and iron works', he would be doing invaluable work; does think, however, he should work from a centre and really wishes it could be done and he would lend a hand, health or not; has decided to give up the Villa Mirenda in March or April; if he cannot face England will return to the ranch in New Mexico where there is space and a desert to ride over.

Gives his impression of the new feeling in Germany 'horrible disillusion, a grinning, awful materialism, but under it, a stir of life'; if he were talking to the young would advise them to 'repudiate the money idea' and try to find out what life itself is; would also teach them to dance and sing together - 'The togetherness is important' - but first they must 'overthrow in themselves the money-fear and money-lust'; asks him to write; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/11.

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La Z 4/2/12 7.1.1928 Letter from D H Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence, to Rolf Gardiner; 7 Jan. 1928.

Acknowledges his long letter which he is answering at once; was interested in the Northumbrian report [on large-scale expedition organised by Gardiner for the German Bünde]; thinks the German Bünde has the 'sound of a real thing' unlike the English side; considers it difficult to do anything with the English as they have so little 'togetherness' and will only be 'bossed about' for a time; refers to Hargrave [John G.] and the Fontainebleau group; unlike the Germans who are still physical, considers the English to be 'woefully disembodied'; thinks they are too 'sophisticatedly civilised' to have any future at all; advises Gardiner against striving with himself too much and advises instead patience and that he find a 'focal point' within himself of 'real at-one-ness'.

Regrets Gardiner's farm [Gore Farm] could not have been a sort of 'little shrine or hearth' where he kept the 'central core of...effort alive'; suggests how best he can achieve this; is afraid even the German Bünde will drift into 'nationalistic, and ultimately fighting bodies: a new, and necessary form of militarism'; does not see this as the way for the 'over-tender' English who need to have their 'religious sense of atoneness' rekindled for which one needs a 'flame of Consciousness' which radiates out; agrees with his song, dance and labour but atoning in the few must be there to give it a real source; seems to him the German Youth is almost ready to 'fuse into a new sort of fighting unity' but the English are older and weary 'even of victory'.

Will give his opinion of the 'Kibbo Kift book' [by John Hargrave] when it comes; urges him to visit although lack of space prevents them inviting him to stay in their flat which they vacate in April; suggests he travel from Florence where their friend Pino Orioli, who has a bookshop will help with directions; will try to go to Frankfurt in the summer; believes his 'bronchials' are beginning to improve; is keen to meet [Carl Heinrich] Becker and [George G.] Goetz and to be at the camp; mentions his sister-in-law and bank manager husband [Johanna and Emil Krug] in Berlin; states his wife [Frieda] would also like to see the 'real German youth' - they always go to Baden and Heidelberg and there is a 'bit too much of the old stink there'.

Wants to know if he is really thinks of coming; have been invited to join Aldous Huxley and his wife in Switzerland but wants to save his limited financial resources for travel in the summer; advises him not to expect too much of the world; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/12.

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La Z 4/2/13 11.1.1928 (c) Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, to Rolf Gardiner; n.d. [11 Jan. 1928].

Because the weather has been so damp they are leaving the following Monday for Diablerets, at 4000ft., in Switzerland to join the Huxleys in the snow; gives their address if he is passing; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

The card is printed 'Cartolina Postale Italiana', bears a red 75 Cent stamp and is postmarked Scandicci 12 Jan 1928; the verso of the card is a black and white reproduction of a painting with the caption 'No. 5264. ASSISI - Chiesa superiore di S. Francesco. S. Francesco. fa scaturire l'acqua da una rupe. (Giotto)' [image from the fresco cycle, 'the life of St. Francis of Assisi', in the Upper Church of S. Francesco in Assisi, thought possibly to be the work of Florentine painter Giotto di Bondone, c.1267-1337].

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/13.

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La Z 4/2/14 16.1.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Firenze, to Rolf Gardiner; Monday n.d. [16 Jan. 1928].

Has read the 'Kibbo Kift book' ['The Confession of the Kibbo Kift: A Declaration and General Exposition of the Work of the Kindred'] with great interest; comments on the book and analyses at length its author [John G. Hargrave] with whom, on the whole, he agrees, respecting him as a 'straightforward fighter'; would never write a criticism in a paper against him rather praise him because his reaction is on the whole sound; wonders how big Hargrave's following is; thinks it is small, and insignificant and that he is not a leader for today; considers a constructive leader today needs tenderness as well as toughness; got a cold which prevents them leaving that day for Switzerland; hopes to set off on the Wednesday or Thursday; expects him in Diablerets on the Saturday; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

Date: item has been annotated, in an unknown hand, '17.1.28'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 6, p. 267 gives the date as 16 Jan. 1928.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/14.

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La Z 4/2/15 2.2.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Chalet Beau Site, Les Diablerets, Vaud, to Rolf Gardiner; 2 Feb. 1928.

Reports that they are now in a little apartment in the chalet and will stay till the end of the month; describes it as fairly pretty and has snow, which he hates but looks upon as a medicine; will be pleased to see him but will have to find him a room at the nearby hotel; tells him to take a 'little electric train thing' from Aigle; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/15.

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La Z 4/2/16 3.2.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Chalet Beau Site, Les Diablerets, Vaud, to Rolf Gardiner; 3 Feb. 1928.

Acknowledges his letter and will expect him to stay between 10 and 12 February; will find him a room in a quiet chalet; reports deep snow, and mentions that the Huxleys [Aldous and Maria] are there and probably also Max Mohr, German dramatist; urges him not to let [Georg] Goetsch or anyone impose their ideas on him, but rather make his own mistakes; asks him to see his sister-in-law Else Jaffe when he is in Heidelberg; claims that she is very nice, knows everybody and has a son his age at the university; mentions her late husband 'a Jew and professor - rich' who became Finance Minister to the 'Bolshevik Bavarian Republic' in 1920; considers Else to be well worth knowing; will meet him at the station when they know his exact arrival; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/16.

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La Z 4/2/17 20.2.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Chalet Beau Site, Les Diablerets, Vaud, to Rolf Gardiner; Monday n.d. [20 Feb. 1928].

Refers to his beastly journey; reports that the weather had been vile whilst Max Mohr stayed but it is now lovely 'still away outside the world' in a nowhere which he likes; wishes to stay two more weeks but Frieda wants to go to Baden Baden for the final week; thinks there is some sort of destiny in Gore farm [became the Springhead Estate, Fontmell Magna, nr. Shaftesbury]; wants to visit it in the summer and absorb its atmosphere; talks of what the future might hold for them and the need, or otherwise, to have roots; suggests he might be the 'whale that will spit forth my Jonahship on to the destined Coast'; mentions that Frieda burnt the last sheet of his letter and so Ralph Coward's address has been lost.

Has just received the 'Downland Man' book [by H.J. Massingham] which looks the sort he will enjoy; appreciates his sending it but chides him for spending his money; will order 'Iron Age in Italy' [by David Randall-MacIver] himself; supposes they will meet again some time and meanwhile 'keep rolling, like thistle-down' that they used to call Angels when they were children; concludes with the remark [attributed to Gregory the Great] 'Non Angli sed Angeli!'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/16.

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La Z 4/2/18 4.3.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Chalet Beau Site, Les Diablerets, Vaud, to Rolf Gardiner; Sunday 4 Mar. 1928.

Remarks that the 'demon-drive' must have been interesting - but sad; comments that all things must die and be born again and that 'we're only in the dying stage as yet'; refers to him being 'shoved out' by the [German] Bünde patriots and continues with a discussion on the subject of Leadership; considers the whole business of leaders and followers to be wrong at that time and, like the demon-drive, Leadership must die and be born different, later on; refers in this context to [Benito] Mussolini, Annie Besant, [Mahatma] Gandhi and White Fox [James Hargrave].

Feels that when leadership is born again it will be based on the 'reciprocity of tenderness', the 'reciprocity of power' being obsolete; illustrates the point with a quotation from the Bible: 'Let there be light'; remarks on the 'inert Austrians' who are 'en route to their death and, let us hope, resurrection'; is leaving for Baden Baden on the Tuesday where Frieda is already; will meet her in Milan and return to the Villa Mirenda on the Wednesday; asks that his sister [Margaret Emilia, b. 1904] just tell them when she is coming; refers to Fascism in Italy which one can ignore for a while but ultimately the 'sense of false power forced against life is very depressing'; says he will send Ralph Coward [a collaborator of Gardiner's] his letter; advises him not to 'kick too hard against the pricks' signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/18.

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La Z 4/2/19 17.3.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence, to Rolf Gardiner; 17 Mar. 1928.

Writes to him in England, hoping that he was not 'put out' by his remarks on leadership (see La Z 4/2/18); asks when his sister Margaret will be coming to stay; gives directions from Florence and sketches a map of the villa's location; requests his help regarding his novel 'Lady Chatterley's Lover' or 'John Thomas and Lady Jane' which he describes as a 'delicate and tender phallic novel'; because [Martin] Secker's view is that, even expurgated, it could not be published publicly, has arranged to publish it in Florence; there will be 1000 copies selling at £2; describes his phoenix design for the cover.

Needs to sell the book because he must make a living; further describes it as a 'novel of the phallic consciousness as against the mental consciousness of today'; thinks Gardiner will dislike it for some things because of his own attitude to the 'phallic reality'; will be sending him a quantity of order-forms and asks him to get what orders he can because the book must be read 'it's a bomb, but to the living, a flood of urge'; considers it part of the crusade they are both concerned with and knows he can rely on him to help; remarks that this is where he throws a 'straight bomb at the skull of idealistic Mammon'; concludes the letter along the margin stating that it will set him apart even more definitely than he is already - 'it's destiny'; signed 'D.H.L.'

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/19.

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La Z 4/2/20 22.6.1928 (c) Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Grand Hotel, Chexbres-sur-Vevey, Suisse, to Rolf Gardiner; n.d. [22 Jun. 1928].

Reports his arrival on Sunday and describes the hotel, which overlooks Lac Leman, as quite nice and good for him; states that the novel [Lady Chatterley's Lover] should be sent out from Florence any day; mentions having seen Adrian Stokes asks him to write and hopes to see him later; signed 'D.H.L.'

The card is addressed to 'Rolf Gardiner, 9 Lansdowne Road, Holland Park, London W.11'; it bears a red 20 stamp and is postmarked Chexbres 22 June 1928; the verso of the postcard is a photograph of a yacht on Lac Leman.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/20.

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La Z 4/2/21 23.12.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Beau Rivage, Bandol, Var, France, to Rolf Gardiner; 23 Dec. 1928.

Has only just received his long letter to Port Cros; is pleased he had a good time with the singing and that Gore [Farm, Dorset] is 'getting on its legs'; is aware he also should find somewhere of his own to live, and having given up the Villa Mirenda they are again 'wanderers in the wide world'; knows Frieda is wanting a house somewhere - he thinks in Tuscany - but he will not consider this because it was bad for his chest; is now feeling 'quite chirpy' because it has been so much better; describes Bandol as a 'dull little place' but friendly and his health has been good; thinks they might go to Spain the following week and do not plan to go up to the snow in the spring, if he keeps well; regrets this will preclude seeing him 'en passant' as at Diablerets the previous year.

Supposes Gardiner will have another busy year but confesses he himself is taking more and more pleasure in being alone, with just an occasional friend; asks after his sister Margaret [Emilia Gardiner] and whether she is still 'dabbling' with school-teaching'; does not agree with him about 'Lady C'; declares that it is a good book and 'if one doesn't smash as one goes, it's no good'; ridicules White Fox's views on 'constructive activity'; asks how he is, the 'Kibbo-Kifter' [John Gordon Hargrave, 1894-1982]; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 4/21.

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La Z 4/2/22 12.1960 'Love and Memory: A Garland of Poems 1920-1960' by Rolf Gardiner; 'Christmas' 1960

A book of poetry by Rolf Gardiner, privately printed at the Blackmore Press, Gillingham, Dorset by T.H. Brickell and Sons, Ltd.; the titlepage contains the printed note 'made by Rolf Gardiner for his friends and members of the Springhead Ring and issued from Springhead, Fontmell Magna, Shaftesbury, Dorset'; the verso of the titlepage is inscribed in Rolf Gardiner's autograph 'Dr Jacob Schwartz, with thanks for his visit on 9 April 1964, Rolf Gardiner'.

In the 'Postscript to my Readers' pp. 63-[67], Gardiner describes D.H. Lawrence as 'my hero-poet' and briefly discusses his poetry.

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La Z 4/2/23 1960 'Wessex Letters from Springhead' by Rolf Gardiner; 'Whitsun' 1960

A series of 'Wessex Letters' edited by Rolf Gardiner and published on behalf of the Springhead Ring; printed by the Blackmore Press, Gillingham, Dorset by T.H. Brickell and Sons, Ltd.; this issue is number 3 and contains: 'Wessex Bishop' and 'Prophet of the New Age' (from 'Uncommon Men: Friendships of Foundation'), 'Towards a Sacramental Agriculture', 'Need for Landscape Husbandry', 'Village Planning and the Changing Countryside', 'The Problem of Nyasaland in Central Africa' and 'Ängholm: An Enchanted Island'.

A section on page 91 has been highlighted in blue ink; the section regards afforestation at Fontmell Magna.

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La Z 4/3 1915-1930 Letters and postcards from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King; 1915-1930

A collection of 64 letters and 5 postcards written by D.H. Lawrence to his sister Emily King between September 1915 and February 1930; many of the letters in the collection are addressed to 'Pamela', D.H. Lawrence's nickname for his sister Emily taken from the title of the novel by Samuel Richardson Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded (1740).

The individual letters are given their own description and can be found under sub-references of La Z 4/3.

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La Z 4/3/1 27.9.1915 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, 1 Byron Villas, Vale of Health, Hampstead to [Emily King]; 27 Sep. 1915

Addresses her as 'My dear Sister'; is sending his new novel ['The Rainbow', not present] and hopes she will like it; describes the wrapper as 'vile beyond words' and thinks Methuen 'a swine to have put it on'; describes the English winter as cold and lugubrious and its approach makes his 'soul feel very dismal'; is glad that 'Peggy' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] is better; urges her not to hurry reading the novel as she probably will not like it; sends love to all; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/3/2 24.3.1922 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Ardnaree, Lake View Estate, Kandy, Ceylon, to [Emily King]; 24 Mar. 1922.

Addresses her as 'My dear Sister'; notes the passing of her birthday and his not having sent her anything; it has been such an eventful time; encloses two small items handwoven by the native women; vividly describes the location of the bungalow in which they have been a week 'uphill among a sort of half wild estate'; also their way of life, the servants who do nothing but get meals ready, and the hot, humid climate; the Prince of Wales [later Edward VIII] visited the previous day; they were opposite him at the 'Perahera' [religious procession of elephants] and tellingly comments on his demeanour 'worn out and disheartened'; enthusiastically describes the Perahera procession 'wild and strange and perfectly fascinating'.

Comments on the general lack of activity but [Earl Henry] Brewster visits the Temple daily to learn Pali, the Buddhist sacred language; wishes she could see it all, as it is most strange and fascinating; expects some English mail soon; sends love to all; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'; adds a note at the top of the letter about the two presents.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/1.

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La Z 4/3/3 14.9.1924 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Del Monte Ranch, Questa, New Mexico to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 14 Sep. 1924

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; has received her cablegram about father [John Arthur Lawrence]; Ada had just written to say he was as well as ever; adds that it is better to be gone than 'lingering on half helpless and half alive'; asks when he died [10 September 1924] and when they buried him; hopes it did not rain; sends £10 to help with the black, 'if you wear it'; believes it bad to put children in black; sent Ada £10 a fortnight ago and sends her another now; urges her to say if she wants help for 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter]; they leave New Mexico for Mexico in October, he is not sorry to leave as the high altitude and cold autumn air has given him a sore chest and throat; sends Frieda's love and his own; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/4 15.11.1924 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Francia, Oaxaca, Mexico to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 15 Nov. 1924

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; has been in Oaxaca for a week; describes the journey from Mexico City on a little narrow railway where there are always bandits; the town is safe and the climate perfect; will send her a blanket woven by the Zapotecas if the post is safe enough; they know nearly everybody in Oaxaca already; adds the pronunciation of Oaxaca for Peg's [Margaret, Emily's daughter] benefit; has met the governor and describes the socialism of the place as 'absurd' and 'unsettled'.

They will move to a house next week leaving [Dorothy] Brett in the hotel; will probably stay until March when they will begin to move north; wants to finish his Mexican novel; has not heard from her but guesses everything is 'alright'; sends love to all from them both; adds a note 'This address is safe' written next to the address; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/5 25.2.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Tehuacan, Puebla to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 25 Feb. 1925

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; has left Oaxaca where he was tied down with 'flu and malaria; Frieda has 'flu and is very depressed; they are leaving for Mexico City tonight where they will wait for a boat from Veracruz to England in three weeks; supposes they will land in Plymouth and will then stay in Devonshire a month or so; tried to send Emily a puma skin but the post office returned it; tells 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] that he had her letter and is glad she got her [Matriculation] exemption; will write when he feels 'more solid'; sends love to them all; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/6 11.3.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Imperial, Mexico D.F. to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 11 Mar. 1925

Addresses her as 'Dear Pamela'; begins 'another blow'; the doctor [Sidney Ulfelder, 1875-] will not let him take a sea voyage nor go to England; must stay in the sun in Mexico or return to the ranch [Del Monte Ranch, Questa, New Mexico]; will return to the ranch as soon as he can travel; urges her to write to him there; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/7 31.3.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Santa Fe to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 31 Mar. n.y. [1925]

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; arrived on Sunday and it is good to be there; describes the climate, it will soon make him well; his 'artist friends', the Dasburgs [Andrew Michael Dasburg and Ida Rauh] are motoring up; adds that he likes this landscape better than any he knows; Mabel Luhan is still in New York with Tony [Luhan] and Witter Bynner got back 2 days ago; the Lawrences will stay a month or so at Del Monte [Ranch] before moving to their own Ranch, which they call Kiowa because the Kiowa Indians used to camp on the hill on which the ranch stands; [Dorothy] Brett is at Del Monte and will stay there; was disappointed not to see spring in England as he has a 'hankering after England'; sends love to them all; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter has been annotated in an unknown hand with '1925?'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 5, p. 228 gives the date as 1925.

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La Z 4/3/8 21.4.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Del Monte Ranch, Questa, New Mexico, to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 21 Apr. 1925.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; replies to her letter and confirms that he was 'awfully sick'; although much better will need to be careful all summer and lie down a great deal, particularly when the cold winds come; is not working yet and mentions that their two Indian servants, Trinidad and Ruffino, do most things for them; explains the process involved in bringing water from the Gallina canyon to their land, which is an expense but essential work; describes the vagaries of the weather; Frieda's nephew Friedel Jaffe will be staying for the summer, after his year as an exchange student in America; hopes to come to Europe in the autumn; she will soon get 'St Mawr' which is due to be published in May by Martin Secker; has a new publisher in America, [Alfred] Knopf; sends love from them both; signed D.H.L.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/2.

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La Z 4/3/9 30.5.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Kiowa Ranch, c/o Del Monte Ranch, Questa, N. Mexico, to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Saturday 30 May n.y. [1925].

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; acknowledges her letter; thinks that Ada [Clarke] should, by now, have received his parcel from Mexico with a puma skin for her; reports on his improving health; states they have been staying on their own ranch [Kiowa] all the time, having spent only the first five days at Del Monte; mentions that is where [Dorothy] Brett is staying; describes the land around their ranch and the process of irrigating it; reports on plans for acquiring more livestock and their efforts at cultivating a garden; hopes she will spend a summer with them one day 'when we are all a bit richer'; assumes she now has got a copy of 'St Mawr' in which there is a description of the ranch.

Is pleased she has another dog but is uncertain about what is best for 'Peg' [Margaret Emily King]; stresses his own hatred of teaching; sends affectionate greetings to 'Joan' [Frieda King]; signed 'D.H.L'; adds a note along the left margin of f 1 that Frieda's nephew Friedel Jaffe 'quite a nice boy of 21' is there; sends a kiss for Joan.

Date: Although Lawrence omitted the year in dating his letter, 'St. Mawr' was published in 1925.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/3.

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La Z 4/3/10 14.7.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Del Monte Ranch, Questa, New Mexico, to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 14 Jul. 1925.

Addresses her 'My dear Pamela'; mentions that it is the 'full hot summer'; asks about her holiday plans; reports on their travel plans later in the year as New York in September, England for October and then a visit to Frieda's mother in Baden Baden; mentions she does not want them to return to America, that they may possibly stay in Europe all the following year, and that Friedel [Jaffe] is soon leaving them; remarks on the 'simple frenzy' people have to come to America; says that although Friedel hated his time in the east [as an exchange student] finds it different here 'not the U.S.A. at all'; expresses his own hatred of the 'real U.S.A.' and feels very drawn to the Mediterranean again; may winter in Sicily.

Expresses his preference for being alone on the ranch and welcomes their 'very quiet life'; has never gone to Taos and has no wish to do so; has been to San Cristobal to have his horse Ambrose shod and on the way saw evidence of porcupines having gnawed the tops of pine-trees; describes seeing a huge porcupine with all its bristles up near the house and then having to remove a bunch of its quills from his horse Aaron's nose; welcomes the solitude again when Friedel leaves; mentions that [Dorothy] Brett is still at Del Monte [ranch] and reports on her recent successful trout fishing which provided their supper; remarks on Joan's [Frieda King] reaction to her school; mentions a new edition of his history, with pictures [Movements in European History] and will send her a copy; signed 'D.H.L.'

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/4.

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La Z 4/3/11 1.10.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Garland's Hotel, Suffolk Street, Pall Mall, S.W.1 to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 1 Oct. 1925.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; had a good crossing [from New York]; supposes they will stay [in London] a week and see a few people; Frieda is seeing her children; then they will come and stay with [Emily King] and Ada [Clarke]; they haven't decided how long to stay in England but will perhaps take a house by the sea for a month and then go to Germany; bids her 'au revoir'; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/12 27.10.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Frau Baronin von Richthofen, Ludwig-Wilhelmstift, BadenBaden, Germany to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 27 Oct. 1925.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; discusses 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter]; adds that a B.A. and a B.Sc. are not much good, except for a teacher; doesn't know anything about a commercial degree; he would be tempted to take Peg out of Mundella [Grammar School, Nottingham]; advises that if Peg is going to marry, she must start to 'live and move a bit'; feels that study is bad for her; they leave on Thursday direct to BadenBaden; dislikes big cities and has had enough of seeing people; advises Emily to 'get out of the Carlton shop' as it is time they all 'spat on your hands, and took a fresh grip on life'; bids 'au revoir' until spring; signed 'D.H.L.'

The letter is addressed from the home of Frau Baronin von Richthofen but was actually written and probably posted in London prior to D.H. Lawrence's departure for Baden-Baden on the 29 October (see chronology in Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 5, p. xxvii).

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La Z 4/3/13 18.11.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Bernarda, Spotorno (Genova), Italy to [Emily King]; 18 Nov. n.y. [1925].

Addresses her as 'My dear Sister'; they arrived Sunday and have taken the Villa Bernarda until the end of March; village isn't exiting but they have had some sunny days and the house stands above the town with a big vineyard garden; thinks they will like it; it is windy but is better than the 'damp darkness of England'; went motoring in Switzerland, hated it and got a cold; asks whether she has made a final decision about 'Peggy' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] (see La Z 3/3/12); signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: '1925' has been written on the letter in an unknown hand; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 5, p. 337 also gives the year as 1925.

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La Z 4/3/14 12.12.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Bernarda, Spotorno Prov di Genova to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Saturday n.d. [12 Dec. 1925].

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; is sorry she has had 'flu and Joan [Emily's daughter] whooping cough; comments that they 'hang onto Peg [Margaret, Emily's daughter] at school'; describes the weather as mild and cloudy; Martin Secker is staying with his wife's people down the road; Secker's wife is here with the baby and is quite discontented; Frieda's daughter Barby [Barbara] is in Alassio, she has not been over to them but they have visited her; sends £3 for Christmas, £1 for 'Peg'; advises her not to bother sending parcels but asks if she can send some Ridgeways tea and Regesan Catarrh Jelly; sends love to them all; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: Letter has been annotated in an unknown hand with 'Dec 1925'; full date given as 12 December 1925 in Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 5, p. 350.

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La Z 4/3/15 14.6.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence, to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 14 Jun. 1926.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; excuses his long silence since his last letter; has been busy typing out F[rieda]'s German translation of 'David' which is 'such a sweat, typing German and making revisions'; will be in Baden for Frieda's mother's birthday on 14 July and will then in England early August; expects to stay in the flat in Chelsea [25 Rossetti Garden Mansions]; has heard from Ada [Clarke] that she has a cottage in Mablethorpe for the month and looks forward to spending a week there with all of them; has also received two invitations to Scotland, one from Compton Mackenzie, but wants to supervise rehearsals for a proposed stage production of 'David' [play was performed by the Stage Society, 22-23 May 1927].

Is reluctant to leave [Villa Mirenda] when they seem just settled in; also wants to return for the 'Vendemmia' (grape harvest) in September and Richard Aldington and his companion Arabella would like to return with them; Rosalind Baynes has remarried [Arthur 'Hugh' Ewart Popham] and lives in London; also gives news of Cath[erine] Carswell who is living in France; refers to [John Middleton] Murry, who seems to be 'withdrawing from the world'; has not seen his [Murry's] Life of Christ yet ['Life of Jesus' published 1926]; mentions that Brett [Dorothy] and Rachael Hawk (neighbour from ranch below) are happily settled on the ranch, about which he is very pleased as the latter is 'very responsible and will look after everything'.

Asks after 'Peg' [Margaret Emily King] and her course, will hear all news when he comes to England; promises to write soon and sends love to them all; signed 'D.H.L.'; adds a note that he thinks she will be amused by the copy he is sending of the 'Laughing Horse', described as a little magazine published by a young American friend in Sante Fe.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/5.

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La Z 4/3/16 21.7.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, c/o Frau Baronin von Richthofen, Ludwig-Wilhelmstift, BadenBaden, Germany to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Wednesday 21 Jul. 1926

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; has been there [Baden Baden] a week and had hot weather until yesterday when there was a storm and rain, today is grey; the Rhine Valley is flooded and 'they are moaning for corn'; describes it as a 'crazy year'; Frieda's mother is well, she was 75 a week ago; comments that 'old ladies here seem to live forever'; the place suits him especially when he drinks the 'hot water that rushes out of the earth'; Germany is more agreeable at the moment than Italy with her 'nervous tension' and 'fascism'; has taken a flat in Chelsea [London] for August and expects to arrive July 30th; has an invitation to go to Scotland and will go if he can afford the travelling; Frieda will stay in London to see her son [Montague Weekley]; they may stay in Bavaria for September on the way back to Italy.

Is afraid that England will be 'depressed and depressing' because of the coal strike; wonders what the result will be and thinks about her and Ada [Clarke] and their businesses; may stop in Nottingham on his way to Scotland and Derby on his way back; is glad 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] has got a job; adds at the end that he encloses £5 for the holiday, for the children; sends love to them all; signed 'D.H.L.'

In the final paragraph of the letter, the phrase 'I am always thinking about you and Ada' has been enclosed in brackets; it is not certain that the bracket's were D.H. Lawrence's.

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La Z 4/3/17 21.9.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, 30 Willoughby Rd, Hampstead, N.W.3 to [Emily King]; 21 Sep. 1926

Addresses her as 'My dear Sister'; received her letter this morning and is glad her teeth are out; believes she will now feel better in every way; recommends eating yeast if the constipation continues; asks about further developments regarding the wholesale business; advises her to talk with the third partner and try and get a grip on the affair; if 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] flags with the evening work, have her knock off; has not heard from Ada [Clarke] about Gertie [Cooper] but Mark Gertler has heard that the sanatorium are offering her a bed for this weekend; Gertler seems well but has had bad haemorrhages.

The cast is being assembled for 'David' but he hasn't seen them; does not feel inclined to stay in London so they leave next Tuesday for Paris; is thinking of taking a house next year for permanency, perhaps in England; hopes Joan [Emily's daughter] is well; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/18 27.9.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, 30 Willoughby Rd, Hampstead, N.W.3 to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Monday n.d. [27 Sep. 1926]

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; they leave for Paris tomorrow; has lunched with Robert Atkins, who is producing 'David'; they are putting off the actual performance until December and he has promised to come back so may be home for Christmas; asks how she is with her teeth gone; Frieda's son Monty had to have 8 teeth removed because of pyorrhoea; asks after Joan; adds that they will be at Villa Mirenda by Saturday; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: letter has been annotated in an unknown hand with 'Sept 1926'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 5, p. 543 gives the date as 27 September 1926.

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La Z 4/3/19 9.10.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 9 Oct. 1926

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; found her letter on their return; comments that once her mouth heals everything will go much better; asks if there are any further developments with Sam[uel King] and the business; it will have to be decided upon as she can't hang on in Carlton; they have grapes hanging in the rooms and eat them as they go; the house smells of the 'great vats of grapes downstairs' which are waiting to soften before the 'men tread on them'; tells 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] that he forgot her little book of songs in Paris but will ask a friend to find one; Arabella and Richard Aldington are staying, they are very nice; advises that if Peg's evening classes are too much, she can drop one; asks about her correspondent in Havre, or Brest; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/20 1.12.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, (Florence) to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 1 Dec. 1926

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; is sorry to hear that Joan is starting to be Bronchial again; advises she is taken to a place like Bournemouth and recommends Emily ask Miss Jolyffe (Gertrude Cooper stayed with Miss Jolyffe in Bournemouth) or Gertie [Cooper]'s cousins in Brighton; he will send her £10 for expenses; has heard from Gertie and believes that the fact she has put on flesh shows she will pull through; has written to Dr Lucas for exact information.

'Peg's' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] letter in French was very good and he will reply; has been painting to amuse himself in the bad weather; describes his pictures as 'big - in oil'; has asked for her to be sent a Cynthia Asquith 'Ghost Book'; she [Cynthia Asquith] has asked him to do a murder story, for a murder book she has in mind; asks if there is anything she or Peg want sending for Christmas; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, '1926' ('1925 or ... or 27' have been crossed out); Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 5, p. 589 gives the year as 1925.

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La Z 4/3/21 20.12.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, (Florence) to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 19 [20] Dec. 1926

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; has sent things from Florence to Ada [Clarke], hopes she gets them before Christmas; also sent 2 paper-covered books, 'Sun' and 'Glad Ghosts', advises her not to lose 'Sun' as there were only 100 copies printed; asks that she send him a pound of good orange pekoe tea but not to bother with anything else; was glad to hear that Joan [Emily's daughter] is better and enjoying herself at the Santa Claus show; has heard from Gertie [Cooper] who seemed very cheerful; adds that it is a long job but that they have cured worse cases.

They have had foggy weather but it is sunny again; went to the Stenterello theatre in Florence yesterday, and found it amusing; they are having friends for Christmas Day and on Friday they are having a Christmas tree for the peasants, 'there are so many of them'; has been painting 3 biggish pictures; Aldous Huxley brought him some canvasses and he is going to take some to Scandicci to be stretched and then thinks he will paint a landscape; describes the lovely winter landscape; must go to Florence tomorrow to get things for the Christmas tree.

Is glad the coal strike is over; 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] has told him that [Emily] bravely eats yeast (see La Z 4/3/17); asks if Sam[uel King] has any ideas now the wholesale scheme is 'sinking into abeyance'; sends love and hopes they have a nice Christmas; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: The letter is dated '19 Dec 1926'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 5, p. 607, n. 1 notes that Lawrence refers to 'Yesterday, Sunday' in the letter and that Sunday was the 19 December, hence the letter should have been dated 20 December.

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La Z 4/3/22/1 25.1.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence, to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Tuesday n.d. [25 Jan. 1927].

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; expresses concern about Gertie's [Cooper] operation; asks after Sarah Ann's [Wrath, née King] health; he has been 'pretty well' so far and remarks on the day's lovely, brilliant sun; has no news but reports on Brewster's [Achsah Barlow] recent visit and his unsuccessful trip to India 'chasing Buddha'; wonders about the need for 'those old heroes nowadays...It's all part of the past, and isn't really vital today'; urges her to send two pounds of good China tea even if it is rather dear; gives detailed instructions on how to send it to safeguard its arrival.

Is getting proofs of a 'little book of Red Indian and Mexican essays' with photograph illustrations which should come out in the Spring; will not be coming to London till end of March in time for [production of] 'David' in April [performed by the Stage Society, 22-23 May 1927]; is tempted by an invitation from Frieda's sister to spend the summer in Bavaria; the 'Taos people' want them to go to the ranch; has just completed his landscape of 'red willow trees and men bathing'; likes it best now and declares 'it is fun to paint'; has been asked by Cynthia Asquith to do a murder book; remarks 'Bad to worse! I don't feel very murderous, either'; sends wishes to her family; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/22/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inghilterra; bears a blue 1.25 Lire stamp, postmarked twice Scandicci 26.1.27; the envelope has been numbered '12' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number, as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

Date: letter has been annotated '18 Jan. 1927?', in pencil in an unknown hand, the envelope is postmarked 26 January 1927; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 5, p. 635 dates the letter 25 January 1927.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/6.

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La Z 4/3/23 20.2.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, (Firenze) to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Sunday n.d. [20 Feb. 1927]

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; the tea came yesterday (see Z 4/3/21 and 22), he had to pay 21 Liras duty; asks her to send more, encloses the money with thanks; asks how she likes the photograph of the house, Frieda is 'that speck in one of the windows'; describes the surroundings to the house, the weather and the variety of flowers in the garden; the two 'Miss Beveridges' [Millicent and Mary] and Mabel Harrison are coming to a villa across the 'dip'; Frieda's daughters are not coming until April when Frieda will meet them in Baden; had a cheerful letter from Gertie [Cooper]; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter has been annotated 'Spring 1927', in pencil in an unknown hand; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 5, p. 644 dates the letter as 20 February 1927.

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La Z 4/3/24 11.3.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 11 Mar. 1927

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; the tea came yesterday (see Z 4/3/23), he had to pay 21 Liras duty; has heard that Joan [Emily's daughter] has measles, he has had 'flu; Frieda is going to Baden on Thursday to meet her children and bring them back for a month; the Brewsters [Achsah and Earl Henry] have asked him to go to Ravello, at Amalfi, south of Naples; will go if he is 'alright'; in April he wants to walk with [Earl Henry] Brewster in Maremma, on the coast north of Rome to look at Etruscan things and do some articles; describes the spring and the countryside; sends £5 and tells her to buy something for Joan and for herself; asks after 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] and comments that he is depressed about Gertie [Cooper]; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/25 5.4.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, 19 Corso d'Italia, Roma to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Tuesday 5 Apr. 1927

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; is on his way back to Mirenda but is first going to look at Etruscan tombs and remains with [Earl Henry] Brewster; has been asked for travel articles and may do them on Etruscan places; is sorry 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] is feeling nervy and upset but many people are like that this spring; refers to Sam[uel King] going into that wholesale business and advises that he must be alert; describes the parks as 'lovely with flowers'; travel has begun to bore him and he feels like turning hermit; 'David' has been postponed until May; sends love to them all; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/26 30.4.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence to [Emily King]; 30 Apr. 1927

Addresses her as 'My dear sister'; is glad the wholesale is off and very glad if Sam[uel King] leaves Carlton; the news about Gertie [Cooper] is awful, it is better to die; they are producing 'David' on the 22 and 23 May, supposes he shall come; will let her know if he does but is not keen; bids 'au revoir then'; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/27 19.5.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Firenze to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 19 May 1927

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; comments that she has no luck with dogs and advises her never to have one while living in town; hopes Sam[uel King] will leave the shop and find something better; believes a change will do her good if she has to leave her house; disappointed not seeing the play ['David'] but has had Malaria on top of his cold; has never been right since 'that whack in Mexico' and feels a bit 'solid'; describes the flowers and the local produce, peas, broad beans, potatoes, artichokes, asparagus and cherries; the Lira has risen in value and this makes everything very dear; heard from Enid Hilton and her husband that they may turn up; it is amazing about Gertie [Cooper], she may live for years now; the Sitwells [Edith and Osbert] are here and want to come out to them; sends love to them all; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/28 11.7.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 11 Jul. 1927

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; is glad she has got a car and a new business; it is just as well if they need not live in Bulwell, 'another hole'; the letter ought to be to 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] as he owes her; is in the dumps having a bronchial attack again; the Doctor had said he brought it on by bathing in the sea at Forte; they leave for Worthersee, Austria in a fortnight, knows nothing about the place but it is in Carinthia, somewhere north of Trieste; Frieda's sister Johanna and husband are going there; the doctor says it is just right and that he should stay in the mountains not the sea; hopes the business will be good and that Sam[uel King] will be careful driving the car; signed 'D.H.L.'

An accidental inkblot on f 1 was given a comet's tail and labelled 'eclipse'; this is an allusion to the eclipse of the sun on 30 June 1927.

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La Z 4/3/29/1 25.7.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Monday n.d. [25 Jul. 1927]

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; thought he was better but the haemorrhage came back; it is nothing serious but he has to 'lie up for it'; English friends come over from Florence all the time, the Huxleys [Aldous and Maria] came from Forte and the Wilkinsons, their neighbours, are very good; they will leave for Austria as soon as he has been up for a week; wonders if it is hotter and drier in England; describes their weather as 'fierce' in the midday and afternoon; sends a pound for 'Peg' [Margaret] and Joan [Emily's daughters] for the holiday; wonders how the Bulwell business goes and how Sam[uel King] likes it; there is not much to say when in bed; sends love to them all; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/29/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inghilterra ; bears a blue 1,25 Lire stamp, postmarked [2]7.7.27; the envelope has been numbered '20' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

Date: the letter is undated and has been annotated 'July 1927', in pencil in an unknown hand; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 6, p. 105 gives the date as 25 July 1927.

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La Z 4/3/30 7.8.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Fischer, Villach, Kärnten, Austria to [Emily King]; Sunday n.d. [7 Aug. 1927]

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; they are staying on in this simple hotel because 'it's amusing seeing the people and the bit of life, after the very quiet [Villa] Mirenda'; is already much better but doesn't walk far yet; feels 'another creature' for getting out of the dry heat of Tuscany; won't stay in the south for the hot weather any more; describes the area in which Villach lies and the tourism and locals; the nation is very poor and there seems to be 'no real government'; the people are nice and considerate and it is a great rest after the 'tension and bullying' of Italy; asks if she got the letter with the £2 for the children; adds that Frieda's sister [Johanna] comes tomorrow; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter is undated and has been annotated 'Aug 1927', in pencil in an unknown hand; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 6, p. 118 gives the date as 7 August 1927.

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La Z 4/3/31 7.9.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Irschenhausen, Post Ebenhausen, Munich, to [Emily King]; 7 Sep. 1927.

Addresses her 'My dear Sister'; comments on the lovely weather and the reunion of the three sisters [Frieda, Johanna, Else], who 'chatter all day long'; mentions his liking of the place and its unchanging quality since he last saw it in 1913; is strongly aware of his brother-in-law Edgar's presence who died in 1918 [Edgar Jaffe, actually died 1921]; he had loved his 'little Bow-wow' [dog kennel]; describes the little wooden chalet and its setting in the corner of miles of forest; enjoys the freedom to wander without restriction 'one feels free, on the open earth'; will be alone soon for a few days after Johanna and Else [Jaffe] leave and then Barbie Weekly [Frieda's daughter] will visit; reports that Grandmother Weekley [Agnes, b. 1840] had died the previous week.

Is philosophical about the level of taxes deducted from his royalties; is happy not to be in Austria which is 'absolutely broken - and endless poverty, and no hope' having lost its industrial regions as a result of the Versailles treaty; considers it a scandal; in contrast describes Germany as 'busy and flourishing...and life fairly cheap; much cheaper than Italy'; concludes the letter along the margin and enquires about her children; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: Lawrence originally dated the letter 6, cancelled this and re-dated 7 Sept 1927.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/7.

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La Z 4/3/32 9.10.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Eden, Baden Baden, to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Sunday n.d. [9 Oct. 1927].

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; hopes that Joan has been successfully treated in hospital; his recent medical examination showed him to be better than the previous year, although his lungs are still not completely clear; continues to be underweight and the doctor wishes him to enter a sanatorium to 'build up'; prefers the judgement of his Florence doctor who had felt there was no need as long as his appetite returned, which it has; finds doctors and sanatoriums only lower his spirits; intends taking the 'inhalation cure' in Baden Baden and if he continues to keep well will not go to a sanatorium; will really try to get better and do nothing else.

Describes the lovely day and their fine hotel suite with good food; refers to 'poor G[ertie Cooper] and sanatoriums' after a year which 'simply breaks my heart'; is aware of the effect on Ada [Clarke] of having her home, with all the responsibility; comments on middle life which is supposed to be one's prime; the best time is when one is over seventy, Frieda's mother is 76 and gets younger instead of older; describes her as very nice, as are Frieda's sisters; Emil [von Krug] sent him 3 doz special malt and Else [Jaffe] got him another doctor; feels better every week but has to be careful.

Will be glad to get back to [Villa] Mirenda as autumn there is 'so lovely'; feels like painting, not writing; Frieda is pining for Italy also; tells 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] that he doesn't envy her struggling with the German language and she is not to study too hard, 'nothing on earth is worth wasting one's reserve of strength for'; is sorry about the colliers; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter was undated and has been annotated in an unknown hand, in pencil, with '9 Oct 1927'; Frieda and Lawrence stayed at the Eden Hotel, Baden Baden between 4 and 18 October 1927; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 6, p. 177 gives the date as 9 October 1927.

An incomplete reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/8.

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La Z 4/3/33 17.10.1927 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Baden Baden, to [Emily King]; Monday n.d. [17 Oct. 1927].

He is glad that Joan is through with her operation, never got her the toys but sent her a tiny picture book which probably won't come; leaves for Milan tomorrow with a lovely journey over Gotthard; begins to hate travelling; hopes he will be well at the [Villa] Mirenda, if not he must go to a higher altitude; Ada [Clarke] thinks sanatoriums wonderful but they seem to him like a hotel with 'rules and regulations, doctors, and milk to drink'; Frieda is keen to return to Italy; he is not going to do much work this winter; will write from the [Villa] Mirenda; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the postcard was undated and has been annotated in an unknown hand, in pencil, with 'Nov 1927'; it is postmarked 'Baden [...]27'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 6, p. 191 gives the date as 17 October 1927.

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La Z 4/3/34/1 30.10.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Sunday 30 Oct. n.y. [1927]

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; hasn't heard from her but supposes everything is alright; it will be a blessing if Joan's [Emily's daughter] tonsils really make a difference to her; recommends a chalky solution for her bronchials; he takes the French 'Solution Pantanberge' and thinks these chalky solutions very useful; describes the weather as 'queer' and 'not Italian at all'; the people are exhausted by a long hot summer and the peasants have had to sell their cattle to a butcher.

He is better but since his illness has lost his attachment with the place and with Italy; would live in England, Devonshire perhaps, if the climate were better; asks after them all and whether the Goose Fair really was the last to be held in the Market Place; feels that if it was then it is the 'end of Nottingham'; wonders how Gertie [Cooper] will be and asks how the shop is, 'even Ada complains of bad business'; sends love to them all; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/34/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inghilterra; bears a blue 1,25 Lire stamp, postmarked 'Firenze, Ferrovia, 31.10.1927'; the envelope has been numbered '8' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

Date: envelope is postmarked 31 October 1927; letter has been annotated in pencil in an unknown hand with '1927'.

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La Z 4/3/35 16.11.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Firenze to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 16 Nov. 1927

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; is sorry the tonsils have left Joan [Emily's daughter] so 'knocked up'; recommends she give her horlicks at night; he has got on well this last month and is going to Florence for the first time since he came back; describes the weather; wants to write to Baden Baden for F[reida]'s mother to send some toys for Joan and Bertie [son of Ada Clarke]; asks her to send some tea, as she did before (see Z 4/3/21-24); is glad Gertie [Cooper] sounds so well; comments that it is a pity trade is so bad, expects it will end in some kind of socialism; tells her not to send anything for Christmas as they are thinking of going to Florence; sends love from them both; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/36/1 8.12.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 8 Dec. 1927

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; the tea arrived and is very nice; is glad Joan [Emily's daughter] liked the animals he sent; it is a nuisance about her cough but it's the air which is bad and the bronchials won't stand up to it; the narcissus are in bud and the anemones are up but it is too soon; he is not sending any parcels this Christmas and encloses 30/- for her and the children; adds that one gets sick of 'things, things, things' and they should be more like the peasants with 'nothing but table, benches and bed'; doesn't think they will go to Florence for Christmas; has promised to go up to the snow with the Huxleys [Aldous and Maria] but they are going to Les Diablerets and he doesn't want to go there; may go later to the Brewsters [Achsah and Earl Henry] in Capri.

If they stay he will have to make a Christmas tree as the peasants are crazy for it; it is quite a miracle for the children who don't have much colour in their lives; advises her to be wary at Christmas and thanks 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] for her letter, she is not to take German so seriously; sends love to all; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/36/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inghilterra ; bears a blue 1,25 Lire stamp, postmarked 'Firenze, Ferrovia 8.xii.1927'; the envelope was originally found with La Z 3/4/1.

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La Z 4/3/37 11.1.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 11 Jan. 1928

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; refers to her letter yesterday, the tea hasn't come and won't if she didn't register it; adds that they confiscate dutiable articles sent in letters and have stolen the letter from Ada [Clarke] containing a hanky and tie; has settled down after Christmas and it is 'beastly' weather; they have decided to go to Switzerland and will send her the address; the Huxleys [Aldous and Maria] are at Les Diablerets and are getting them a little flat; he is not very fond of Italy nowadays and may look for a place in Devonshire; wants to try what the mountains will do for him first, 4000 feet is just the right altitude; hopes she is feeling well; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/38/1 3.2.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Chalet Beau Site, Les Diablerets, (Vaud) to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 3 Feb. 1928

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; was worried to hear about the shop and the £300 deficit is serious; hopes the mystery is cleared up or she will have to join Sam[uel King] in the shop; describes the ups and downs in the weather and he hates snow even when it is good and dry; snow is not his 'line', nor winter sport although he has been tobogganing which is easy; Frieda has tried with skis and spent most of her time 'swimming in the snow trying to get up'; may try skiing if he is feeling better next week.

The Huxleys have a chalet nearby; lists the members of the Huxley party, 'Julian, the professor, brother', Rose, Maria's sister, is Belgian and Juliette [Huxley] is French Swiss; wishes she could have come as 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] would have liked it, 'trying her French'; they get bored changing languages, he hates foreign languages; feels much stronger today and hopes he does not 'go back again'; sends love and hopes things 'turn out'; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/382), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre; bears a blue 30 stamp, postmarked Les [...] Vaud 4.II.1928; the envelope has been numbered '10' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with 'Feb 1928'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 6, p. 285 gives the date as 3 February 1928.

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La Z 4/3/39 15.3.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 15 Mar. 1928

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; they have been back a week and it has rained; it was much warmer in the snow at Diablerets and they will pack up and return to Switzerland; Ada [Clarke] ordered him some medicine 'of Aunt Ada's man' [Ada Krenkow] and the bill has come but not the stuff; she [Emily] hasn't written so he is afraid she hates the shop; advises her not to worry and to be cheerful 'even if the skies fall'; asks if she wants anything from Florence for her birthday and lists some possible items; a postscript adds that he is ordering her the 'Cavalleria Rusticana' book [D.H. Lawrence's translation of Verga's 'Cavalleria Rusticana and other stories'; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/40/1 13.4.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, (Florence) to [Emily King]; 13 Apr. 1928

Addresses her as 'My dear Sister'; has been waiting to send her cloth; Frieda got her a 'smallish tea-cloth, sort of terra-cotta and six napkins'; 'Barby' [Barbara, Frieda's daughter] will bring it back from Italy and post it to her from London; 'Barby' is in Alassio, Frieda and her sister have gone to visit her; Else [Jaffe] has been staying on her way back from Capri and will go from Alassio to Heidelberg; he will begin packing up on Monday as they are to leave [Villa Mirenda] for Switzerland; will stay in Switzerland until July, then England and perhaps Taos [New Mexico] in the autumn; has been taking Ada's medicine but it does not have much effect, his chief trouble is 'bronchial' and he does not believe the medicine is for bronchials.

Has had a postcard from 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] at Versailles [Paris] and she seems to be having a good time; knows that the shop is wretched but [Emily] should have got a decent business when Sam[uel King] was leaving Carlton; she must watch carefully for an opportunity of getting out of Bulwell; asks why she took another shop which depended on coal; Miss [Millicent] Beveridge and her sister [Mary] are arriving in Florence today, he will send her something with them when they return to England; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/40/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inghilterra ; bears a blue 1,25 Lire stamp, postmarked Fi[renze], Ferrovia 13.iv.28; the envelope has been numbered '7' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

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La Z 4/3/41 28.5.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Florence to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 'Whit Monday' n.d. [28 May 1928]

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; describes Whit Monday as a 'marvellous lovely day' and wonders where she is jaunting off to; they do not celebrate Whitsuntide in Italy, they celebrated Ascension 10 days ago and it rained; it has been awful weather but it 'thundered it's head off' on Saturday and now is lovely; there are many poppies and the peasants are cutting the hay with sickles; there has been an epidemic of 'flu and he has had it, but not badly; it would have been 'useless, crazy' to go to Switzerland again so they will stay in Italy before going to the mountains to look after his chest.

Enid Hopkin and her husband have been staying at the inn nearby and came fairly often; describes her as 'an unsatisfied little thing' and her husband as 'rather dull'; expects the Brewsters [Achsah and Earl Henry], from Capri, will stay when they leave [Villa Mirenda]; hopes the shop is doing well and that she is cheerful'; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with '1927?'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 6, p. 413 gives the date as 28 May 1928.

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La Z 4/3/42 11.7.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Kesselmatte, Gsteig b. Gstaad (Bern) to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Wed n.d. [11 Jul. 1928]

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; they have settled into their chalet, it is a 'very pretty place'; the 'woman and her daughter' [Frau Kathe and Lena Trachsl] go to the hay at 4am and come in the evening to wash up and do the evening meal; asks if she would come for a fortnight if he sent the money; thinks the place will do him good, he has a table and seat under the pine trees where he sits in the morning and paints a little but he is too 'hazy' to get anything done; the Brewsters [Achsah and Earl Henry] arrived today and Frieda will help them find a chalet; the language is German but over the pass in Diablerets it is French; he does not go very far because the climbing is all up and down and he gasps going up hill.

Asks about her holiday plans and encloses £5 for the 'holiday fund'; they have taken the chalet until September but may stay on; will probably come to England at the end of September for an exhibition of his pictures in a private Gallery in London; does not really want to be in Switzerland but the doctors say it is where he ought to be and he wants to be rid of 'this beastly cough'; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with 'July 1928'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 6, p. 456 gives the date as 11 July 1928.

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La Z 4/3/43 25.7.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Kesselmatte, Gsteig b. Gstaad (Bern) to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Wed n.d. [25 Jul. 1928]

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; she must make up her mind if she wants to come; the altitude is 4000ft and makes 'one feel pippy' for several days; it is a pity 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] would only have 10 days; describes 3 options for travel by train from Paris to Gstaad via Montreux, Paris to Diablerets via Aigle or from Calais to Gstaad via Berne; he wants to come to England in September and may come via BadenBaden; it is lovely here but he cannot really go walking; Frieda was thrilled by the [Nottingham] Guardian and the 'accounts of the new University'; supposes they will see it someday; describes the journey by Lake of Geneva and Castle of Chillon as 'very lovely'; asks what she has decided about Joan; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with 'July or Aug 1928'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 6, p. 473 gives the date as 25 July 1928.

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La Z 4/3/44 31.7.1928 Letter from Frieda Lawrence, Gsteig bei Gstaad to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Tuesday n.d. [31 Jul. 1928]

Addresses her as 'Dear Pamela'; it was thrilling to get 'Peggy's [Margaret, Emily's daughter] letter as they wondered whether they [the Kings] would come; the weather is 'cool and fresh and sunny' and she hopes it will keep; [D.H. Lawrence]'s cough seems better; asks her to bring '2 meridian vests ... large women's and 2 pairs of knickers ... [and] an eiderdown for your brother'; suggests she use the eiderdown as a travelling cushion and recommends she has some mineral water with her in the carriage; describes 'Peggy' as 'so efficient'; they seem to have floods of Americans, 'friends of the Brewsters' [Achsah and Earl Henry] and had an Indian writer 'Mukerje' to tea.

It is a very simple place but if the weather is fine they will enjoy it; 'Peggy' won't need any German as everybody speaks French or English; asks her to bring 3 pairs of good silk and wool stockings; suggests warm clothes but 'nothing smart out here'; bids 'a rivederci'; signed 'Frieda'.

D.H. Lawrence adds a note at the end of the letter; he did not realise Frieda wanted so many things; the £5 is for Emily and the £2 is for Frieda's things; he will pay the rest when he knows how much.

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with '1928'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 6, p. 484 gives the date as 31 July 1928.

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La Z 4/3/45 16.8.1928 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Gsteig to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Thursday n.d. [16 Aug. 1928]

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; shall expect her on the 26 [August] at 9 in the morning; hopes she will not be too tired; she need not bring the eiderdown but it won't matter 'as far as customs goes'; she does not need to wash the 'undies' [for Frieda] but should fold them carelessly with her own things; the weather broke last night and it is a rainy day; expects the Brewsters [Achsah and Early Henry] to be there when they come and Frieda's sister wants to come September the 15th but he thinks they will be leaving for Baden and then England; is sorry Joan is not well; advises her not to 'get in a stew' about the journey; signed 'D.H.L.'

The postcard bears a small green printed drawing of mountains, with the caption 'BRUNNEN / Vierwaldstättersee'; it bears 2 10r stamps and is postmarked 'Gsetig [b]ei Gstaad 16.vii.28

Date: the card has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with 'Aug 1928'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 6, p. 508 gives the date as 16 August 1928.

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La Z 4/3/46/1 20.10.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, La Vigie, Ile de Port-Cros, Var to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Sat. 20 Oct. 1928

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; her letter was the first he received on the island; they get mail on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, but only if the sea is 'smooth enough for the boat to come'; Frieda arrived from Florence with a cold which she gave to him; describes The Vigie, 'the watch place' and its surroundings, it is rather fun and the island is 'all green pine forest'; there are no people on the island, only a few fishermen and a hotel on the bay, an hours walk away; an Italian, 'Giuseppe', fetches everything on his donkey 'Jasper' and does domestic tasks; Frieda, Arabella [Dorothy Yorke] and Brigit Patmore do the cooking among them and he thinks they will stay until at least Christmas.

He had her letter, and 'Peg's [Margaret, Emily's daughter], and the Kodaks; thought he looked 'horrid' but that those of the Trachsl's were excellent; he is not working and it will take him some time to settle down with the other people; tells 'Peg' that he will send some typing when he has any; the [Nottingham Goose] Fair must have been 'grand' on the Forest site; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/46/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre ; bears a blue 1f50 stamp, postmarked 'Ile de Port-Cros 23 Oct 1928'; the envelope has been numbered '3' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

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La Z 4/3/47/1 22.11.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Beau-Rivage, Bandol, Var to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 22 Nov. 1928

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; describes [Bandol] as very pretty; the hotel is good, inexpensive and with good food; the weather is wonderful but the sea is rough and he is glad he has not been crossing from the Island [Ile de Port-Cros]; tells 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] that he has done little work and the little he did in Port-Cros was typed by Arabella [Dorothy Yorke]; now he is doing a little verse; the publishers are 'worrying' him for a book and want him to finish 'the Etruscan book'; may go to Italy at the end of the month to finish it; will stay over Christmas with the Brewsters [Achsah and Earl Henry] in Capri; asks after them all and the 'immortal shop'; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/47/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre ; bears a blue 1f50 stamp, postmarked 'Ba[ndol]'; the envelope has been numbered '4' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

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La Z 4/3/48/1 10.12.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Beau Rivage, Bandol, Var, France to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Monday n.d. [10 Dec. 1928]

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; has not yet returned to Florence because the bad weather there would affect his health; comments on Frieda's restlessness in a hotel with nothing to do, although she is uncertain about where exactly she wants a house, varying from 'Lago di Garda to Taormina'; he expresses a preference for Spain, to see new places but not to settle down; the Brewsters [Achsah and Earl Henry] expect them in Capri for Christmas but it is 'an infernal long way. Barcelona is much nearer'; is not sending any Christmas parcels because the mail is such a 'curse' and asks her not to send anything; mentions visit of a young Welsh writer, Rhys Davies; asks how the year has been with the shop.

The exhibition of pictures [at Warren Gallery, London] is 'still vague'; thinks Dorothy Warren is now married [November 1928 to Philip Coutts Trotter]; considers it just as well the exhibition was delayed in view of the 'fuss in John Bull' [anonymous article in 20 October issue] over his novel ['Lady Chatterley's Lover']; mentions that another gallery now wants to show his pictures; also a man [Jack Lindsay] wishes to publish a portfolio of the black and white reproductions, done from photographs. [See La C 22 letter dated 19 Dec from Lawrence to Dorothy Warren on this subject.]

Reports that Frieda has invited her daughter 'Barby' [Barbara Weekley] to stay for a few days following a bout of 'flu; if she accepts they will remain over Christmas and then go to Spain; does not share Frieda's long held wish to go to Majorca as he is 'by no means keen on islands'; congratulates 'Peg' [Margaret Emily King] on her German letter which Frieda will answer; finds it boring to have to speak French and the French people don't really interest him; considers them 'rather self-centred smallish people' but admits that everyone is very nice; signed 'D.H.L'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/48/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre ; bears a blue 1f50 stamp, postmarked 'B[...] Var'; the envelope has been numbered '15' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with 'Dec 1928'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 7, p. 52 gives the date of 10 December 1928.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/9.

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La Z 4/3/49/1 19.12.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Beau Rivage, Bandol, Var to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 19 Dec. 1928

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; has received her letter and is glad everything goes well although it will be an anxious moment when Sam[uel King] takes stock; has ordered her a copy of 'Lady Chatterley's Lover' for Christmas but advises her not to read it as she will find it 'rather heavy'; adds that she should not let 'Peg' [Margaret, Emily's daughter] read it and should keep it uncut as 'its value is then higher'; encloses £2 for 'Peg' and Joan; they are to stay in Bandol for Christmas and Elsa Weekley may come with her 'Teddy' [Bernal Edward de Martelly Seaman] and 'Barby' [Barbara Weekley]; 'Barby' has been ill and Elsa wants to marry 'Teddy' in March or April; describes her as 'not wildly keen ... like the moderns'.

It is hot in the sun and 'sharp cold' in the shade which gets his 'bronchials'; they have a young Welsh writer, Rhys Davies, staying who is 'quiet and not tiring'; his grandfather was a Welsh miner and his father has a shop; he brought them a plum cake from Nice so they are already a 'bit Christmassy'; adds that Nice is getting full of English people and that it is amazing how much money the English have; hopes they are all well and comments on the illness of the King [George V] as 'depressing'; sends love and wishes them a 'jolly' Christmas; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/49/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre ; bears a blue 1f50 stamp, postmarked 'Bandol, Var'; the envelope has been numbered '18' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

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La Z 4/3/50/1 11.1.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Beau Rivage, Bandol, Var, France to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 11 Jan. 1929.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; 'Barby' Weekley will be leaving for Paris after her ten day stay; describes the unfortunate effect on her of 'those studio parties in London', but adds that she is not his responsibility; mentions a young Canadian, studying at Oxford, who is staying another week to be followed by the Huxleys [Aldous and Maria] on their way to Italy; does not mind extending their stay in Bandol as it is sunny and pleasant, if not exciting, but he does not want excitement; describes the advent of the New Year in a 'crash of storm' followed by unexpected snow and ice; however the sun 'blazes and is warm all day' and he considers the sun more important than most things, particularly casual people.

Mentions their visit to Toulon the previous day and their trip that afternoon out to sea in a motor-boat; this had enabled him to see the mountains behind deep in snow; reports on [Percy Reginald] Stephensen's visit about his pictures (see La C 22 on the subject) and his plans to reproduce them in a limited edition book, with the exhibition to be held in March exactly when the book is published; promises her a copy; has received a letter from Frau Trachsel concerning the skiing condition; asks if Sam[uel King] has taken stock yet; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/50/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre ; bears a blue 1f50 stamp, postmarked 'Bandol, Var 11.1.29'; the envelope has been numbered '2' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/10.

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La Z 4/3/51 22.2.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Beau Rivage, Bandol, Var to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 'Friday Evening' n.d. [22 Feb. 1929].

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; Ada left that afternoon leaving him feeling very unhappy as she does not 'seem her old jolly self any more'; supposes they are all changing in their 'feelings' and 'outlook'; hopes they can come through to something 'better and more peaceful'; didn't go to Toulon as he has 'a bit of a sore chest'; wants to leave [Bandol] in a week and go to Corsica, they really like it; wishes he could find somewhere to 'take a house and settle and make a life'; stresses it is much better for her to come to the sun than for him to visit 'gloomy England'; has not thanked her for the hankies, he likes coloured ones and always uses the ones she gave him; did not send presents, he dislikes 'this exchanging of presents business', yet he likes his hankies; will write next week and tell her all the plans; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with 'Spring 1929'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 7, p. 187 give the date as 22 February 1929.

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La Z 4/3/52/1 8.3.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Bandol, Var to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 8 Mar. 1929.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; he is leaving for Paris on Monday and Frieda is going direct to Baden to visit her mother; he is going to Paris to arrange publishing a cheap edition of 'Lady C[hatterley's Lover]'; there are now 3 pirated editions so he wants to bring out a cheaper edition and 'cut them out once and for all'; Rhys Davies is coming to Paris with him so he won't be alone; describes Davies as 'very nice' although 'rather poor'; describes the 'little turn to real spring' following 'that awful cold'; will not come to England just now unless for something special she should soon receive a prospectus for his book of pictures and he hopes she likes it; hopes Joan is better and adds that they need the real spring as they could all 'do with a bit of tittivating up'; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/52/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre; bears a blue 1f50 stamp, postmarked 'Bandol, Var 9.3.29'; the envelope has been numbered '11.' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

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La Z 4/3/53 13.3.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Grand Hotel de Versailles, 60, Boulevard Montparnasse, Paris to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Wednesday n.d. [13 Mar. 1929].

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; just a line to say he has arrived in Paris 'all right, a bit tired, but not so much as you might expect'; Paris seems 'dark and grey' after Bandol but the hotel is nice.

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with 'March 1929'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 7, p. 216 gives the date as 13 March 1929.

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La Z 4/3/54 23.3.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, c/o Aldous Huxley, 3 rue du Bac, Suresnes, Seine to [Emily King]; Saturday n.d. [23 Mar. 1929].

Addresses her as 'My dear Sister'; did not write her a birthday letter due to the 'fuddle' of too many people around; is sending her 'a little money'; returns to the Hotel de Versailles [Paris] on Wednesday and Frieda will arrive in the evening with her nephew Friedel; got a cold in Paris which he describes as 'dirty place, filthy air'; does not know where they will go after Easter; the Huxleys [Aldous and Maria] look after him well but he does not feel 'nearly so well as in Bandol'; apologises for his letter being late, 'shabby' and 'dull' but he cannot write there; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with 'March 1929'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 7, p. 225 gives the date as 23 March 1929.

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La Z 4/3/55 5.4.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Grand Hotel de Versailles, 60, Boulevard Montparnasse, Paris to [Emily King]; 5 Apr. 1929.

Addresses her as 'My dear Sister'; they leave Paris on Sunday for Spain; he is anxious to go as he hates 'these great cities', they are bad for his health; is longing for the South where 'the people are not so worried'; they were away four days at Easter in the French country which always seems 'melancholy and dead' to him; Frieda's nephew Friedel [Jaffe] is with them and 'none too happy'; wonders why he stays as he has a job in the Town Hall at BadenBaden; the weather is 'rather cold and trying to rain'; believes the 'Bois de Boulogne' was lovely in the days of horses and carriages but now it is 'obscene with motorcars'; Frieda's daughter Elsa gets married tomorrow in a 'great splash of a white wedding'; wishes they could all go south and live in the sun but he cannot come to England; sends love to them all; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/56/1 27.4.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Principe Alfonso, Palma de Mallorca, Spain to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 27 Apr. 1929.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; comments on Joan [Emily's daughter] having mumps, he will send a 'list of all possible childish ailments, for her to pick and choose'; he has had 'a little whack of malaria' and supposes coming so far south has brought it out; they were about to take a house but better not stay if he is 'in the shaking zone'; have changed hotels and describes this one as 'very nice, over the sea with big gardens and lots of room'; it is cool for the time of year, 'almost chilly'; describes the island, 'very nice, very quiet, not so beautiful by far as Sicily'.

The pictures are being photographed in colour and plates made; the work is being done by an English firm and is 'smudgy and the colour not true'; wishes it could have been done in Germany; the exhibition is to wait until the book is ready in May unless there are delays; Elsa [Weekley]'s wedding 'went off in great style' and the couple are in Turin with Lady Becker [Edward Seaman's] aunt; has not heard from Ada [Clarke], supposes she is busy; hopes Joan is better and that 'spring is co-o-oming, as we used to sing'; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/56/2) addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inglaterra; bears a blue 40cs stamp, postmarked 'Palma 28 ABR[...]'; the envelope has been numbered '17' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

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La Z 4/3/57/1 8.6.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Principe Alfonso, Palma de Mallorca, Spain to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 8 Jun. 1929.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; apologises for being so long in writing but 'one lets the time slip by, and does nothing'; describes this as an 'extraordinary place for not working' but he does not want to write or paint, which is good for him; he is better for his stay and the 'fairly hot' weather seems to suit him; he lounges around or goes to the little beach, Frieda is bathing there as he writes and he shall take a dip if his cough 'holds better'; went on a long motordrive with friends on Thursday up the east coast but the sun is getting too hot 'for motoring'.

The book of pictures is being bound up and he has sent Stephensen her address to forward a copy; hears no news of the exhibition and supposes 'they are a bit afraid of the police interfering, since this Jix [Sir William Joynson Hicks] upheaval and Scotland Yard activity'; wonders if things will be easier with the Labour cabinet; he would vote Labour were he in England, he has 'no sympathy with mealy-mouthed nonentities like Baldwin' and describes Lloyd George as a 'treacherous bug'; he is not keen on going to Germany or Switzerland and they may go to north Italy, to Lago di Garda; 'Pansies' is due for publication at the end of June and he will have her sent a copy; is glad Joan is better and hears she [Emily] is getting new furniture; sends love to all; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/57/2) addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inglaterra; bears a blue 40cs stamp, postmarked 'Barcelona 11 JUN 29'; the envelope has been numbered '5' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

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La Z 4/3/58 23.6.1929 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Pensione Giuliani, Viale Morin, Forte dei Marmi (Lucca) to [Emily King]; n.d. [23 Jun. 1929].

He has arrived easily; the Huxleys and some German friends are living nearby but 'very few visitors yet'; describes the beach as very nice; hopes she has visited London to see Frieda and the show [Exhibition of paintings at the Warren Gallery]; he hears the show is a success but the 'critics are adverse'; signed 'D.H.L.'

The postcard is addressed to 'Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inghilterra'; it bears 1 green 25 cent, 1 purple 20 cent and 1 brown 30 cent stamps; postmarked 'FORTE DEI MARMI, LUCCA 24.6.29'.

Date: the card is postmarked 24 June 1929; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 7, p. 338 gives the date as 23 June 1929.

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La Z 4/3/59 1.7.1929 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Forte to [Emily King]; n.d. [1 Jul. 1929].

He received her letter and is glad she liked the show [Exhibition of paintings at the Warren Gallery]; he is well and wonders if Frieda will come and visit her; she wants him to come to England and although one part of him would like to, another part 'shrinks from it'; thinks he will leave shortly for Florence and then go north to Milan; supposes Frieda will meet him in Milan or Como or perhaps he will meet her in Germany; signed 'D.H.L.'

The postcard is addressed to 'Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inghilterra'; it bears 1 green 25 cent, 1 purple 20 cent and 1 brown 30 cent stamps; postmarked 'FORTE DEI MARMI, LUCCA 2.7.29'.

Date: the card is postmarked 2 July 1929; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 7, p. 350 gives the date as 1 July 1929.

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La Z 4/3/60 10.7.1929 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Florence to [Emily King]; 10 Jul. n.y. [1929].

Begins 'more catastrophes' [reference to the seizure of paintings from the Warren Gallery] and describes it as 'nonsense' which 'makes one tired'; Frieda is staying in London but thinks he will leave Florence at the weekend before it gets 'unpleasantly hot'; has had a nasty cold so he stayed in bed at [Giuseppe] Orioli's flat, 'it must have been the beastliness of London reaching out'; adds that it is partly 'Pansies' [book of poems] that 'makes them attack'; hopes she is well; signed 'D.H.L.'

The postcard is addressed to 'Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inghilterra'; it bears 1 green 5 cent, 2 purple 20 cent and 1 brown 30 cent stamps; postmarked 'FIRENZE 10.7.29'.

Date: the card is postmarked 10 July 1929; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 7, p. 364 gives the date as 10 July 1929.

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La Z 4/3/61/1 13.7.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Florence to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; Sat. n.d. [13 Jul. 1929].

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; Frieda arrived suddenly on Thursday night seeming well but having 'wrenched her foot again'; his cold is much better but he is 'still sore inside'; they leave for BadenBaden next Tuesday; sends £10 for the holidays; is still awaiting a wire to know 'the fate of the pictures', he is 'very fed up'; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/61/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inghilterra; bears a 1,25 Lire stamp, postmarked 'FIRENZE, FERROVIA 13.vii.29'; the envelope has been numbered '6' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with 'July 1929'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 7, p. 366 gives the date as 13 July 1929; the accompanying envelope is postmarked 13 July 1929.

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La Z 4/3/62/1 21.8.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Löwen, Lichtenthal, BadenBaden to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 21 Aug. 1929.

Addresses her as 'Dear Pamela'; they are leaving [Baden-Baden] on Sunday for Bavaria to see Frieda's sister Else [Jaffe]; they have been there 5 weeks and Frieda's mother has been with them the whole time; finds her 'seventy-eight years' 'oppressive' and he gets depressed there; hears that Dorothy Warren got the pictures back and the show will close on the 31st August [exhibition of paintings at the Warren Gallery]; feels angry at the 'false hypocritical fuss' but will get his own back 'one of these days'.

Achsah Brewster and Harwood are in England; Harwood is going to school in Devonshire, she wants to be a doctor; Earl [Henry Brewster] is still in Capri and they want him [Lawrence] to go and live there but he feels it is too small; Boshi [Sen], 'the Hindu who was in Gsteig' [Switzerland] has gone back to India and Earl is pining to go too; is glad she liked Skegness, compares it to Forte where he has been invited but he hopes to stay in Bavaria; describes the fruit as cheap but with little taste, unlike in Italy; adds that he never feels in 'good humour' in Germany; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/62/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, England; bears a blue 25 stamp, postmarked 'BADEN BADEN 21.8.29'; the envelope has been numbered '16' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

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La Z 4/3/63 3.9.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Kaffee Angermaier, Rottach-am-Tegernsee, Oberbayern to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 3 Sep. 1929.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; comments on the lovely weather but curses the fact that he is not very well and must stay in bed; describes the successful bone-setting of Frieda's foot by a farmer from the next village which now allows her to 'really walk'; resents the earlier expense of those 'beastly doctors' in London and Baden; has had a visit from Else [Jaffe] from nearby Irschenhausen where they stayed two years previously; also have local friends and people from Munich visiting but wishes he wasn't always 'knocked out'; has ordered her a copy of the private edition of 'Pansies'; explains why this has been delayed due to a 'muddle' by the printer.

Wishes Dorothy Warren would shut the show [exhibition of his paintings at Warren Gallery] and send back the pictures; she is planning to see them in September, possibly meeting in Venice for a few days; is looking forward to going to Italy and finding a house; signed 'D.H.L.'

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/11.

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La Z 4/3/64 4.10.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Beau-Soleil, Bandol, Var, France to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 4 Oct. 1929.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; hears she is ill and encloses £5 for the doctor; his health 'went down with a slump' in Germany and he will not go north again; describes the doctors as 'merely a fraud'; has not done any work all summer but does not care; Dorothy Warren has paid him for the pictures sold [from the Exhibition at the Warren Gallery] but he is concerned about the delivery of the pictures themselves; Max Mohr is there and the Brewsters [Achsah and Earl Henry] will probably come for the winter; they [the Brewsters] are restless and 'everybody seems the same, restless and out of sorts'; suggests she visit later if he can 'chirp up' but he has 'no strength, and everything is an effort'; sends love from them both; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/65/1 9.11.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Beau Soleil, Bandol, Var to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 9 Nov. 1929.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; he is feeling better and is 'really picking up'; has taken several motor-rides with the Brewsters [Achsah and Earl Henry] and is taking short coastal walks; went inland yesterday and describes it as 'a lovely country'; the Brewsters have found a 'lonely' house and they [the Lawrences] will go into a permanent house after Christmas; their current house is 'very comfortable' and Frieda likes it; hopes her [Emily's] health keeps up; Orioli is sending her a translation and she should receive his pamphlet on 'Obscenity'[Pornography and Obscenity]; the Huxleys are in Spain and she [Maria] is driving, is sure she will be 'worn out'; sends love to them all; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/65/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre; bears 3 red 50c stamps, postmarked 'BANDOL, VAR 9.11.29; the envelope has been numbered '14' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

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La Z 4/3/66/1 11.11.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Beau Soleil, Bandol, Var to [Emily King]; Monday 11 Nov. n.y. [1929].

Addresses her as 'My dear Sister'; has received her letter and the cake; comments on her silver wedding anniversary and adds that when it is his turn he will 'carefully forget it is coming'; he and [Earl Henry] Brewster are having his half of the cake; Frieda and Achsah [Brewster] are in Marseille; hopes she is 'well and chirpy'; comments that old Mrs King [Emily's mother-in-law] is a 'terror'; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/66/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angelterre; bears a blue 1f50 stamp, postmarked 'TOULON, MARSEILLES 12.11.29'; the envelope has been numbered '22' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

Date: the letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with '1929'; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 7, p. 561 gives the date as 11 November 1929.

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La Z 4/3/67/1 30.11.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Beau Soleil, Bandol, Var, to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 30 Nov. 1929.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; gives careful instructions for choosing and packing items of Christmas fare for which he has asked and which Harwood Brewster [daughter of Earl and Achsah Brewster] will bring with her; gives her school address; also asks that Ada send by her items of underclothing for Frieda; mentions that the Brewsters will be eating with them at Christmas which means pretending the mince-meat and pudding are made with nut-fat as they would 'faint at the thought of suet'; describes their rented house which is situated about five miles away and Achsah's hiring of a 'horizontal grand piano' despite their assertion that they have no money; they want him to find a permanent house near them but he still feels 'disinclined for a permanency' and anyway has the present house till end of March.

Mentions that Maria Huxley wants to come in January to buy a house; has been visited daily by Frederick Carter who has been staying at the Beau Rivage for the past two weeks; also had daily visits from the Brewsters and expects a friend from Sante Fe [Ida Rauh] soon; comments on the 'grey, uneasy' weather and on his health being 'only middling' but he stays comfortably in bed and does not bother; tells her he has ordered his 'Obscenity article' [Pornography and Obscenity] for her but she need not read it; remarks that it 'stirs them up a bit' and describes 'Jix' [Sir William Joynson Hicks] as a 'mealy-mouthed worm'; is appreciative of the New Statesman 'standing up for me boldly' [review of the article by R.A. Barclay on 23 November].

Has not sent her 'Escaped Cock' yet, which is out [published by Black Sun Press] and 'very beautifully printed'; thinks all 500 copies have been shipped from Paris to New York but trade is very bad there owing to the effects of the Wall Street crash; must therefore go slow for a time; concludes by stressing she should not send any parcel by post because of the time it takes and damage caused; signed 'D.H.L.'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/67/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre; bears a blue 1f50 stamp, postmarked 'BANDOL 30.11.29'; the envelope has been numbered '23' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/12.

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La Z 4/3/68 12.12.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Beau Soleil, Bandol, Var, to [Emily King]; 12 Dec. 1929.

Addresses her as 'My dear Sister'; has received Ada's basket; does not know who they will invite for Christmas; Ida Rauh is staying in a hotel nearby, as are the Brewsters [Achsah and Earl Henry]; discusses the Brewsters' financial situation and describes them as 'very silly about their money'; has read about bad weather in England but they have had 'lovely sunny days'; his health is better but 'not behaving very well this year'; discusses the flowers in the room and the vegetables grown after the 'autumn rains'; asks about the shop and sends a 'little cheque which came for some poetry'; it is too soon to be 'wishing Christmas wishes' but wonders if the children will like to have time to spend their money; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/3/69/1 15.1.1930 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Beau Soleil, Bandol, Var, to 'Pamela' [Emily King]; 15 Jan. 1930.

Addresses her as 'My dear Pamela'; writes in place of Frieda, who has not replied to her letter; will be pleased to see her and Ada at the end of February and suggests that Frieda could go to Germany whilst they are there to look after him; thinks it would do her good to get away for a bit as she gets a bit sick of his being 'so much in bed'; says he is really rather better again but never wants to walk or move about; reports that Mr [Laurence] Pollinger is at the Beau Rivage and Else [Jaffe] will be arriving the next day to stay with them for a week; Harwood Brewster left for England the previous day and was delighted to return to school which she finds preferable to home; mentions having asked Ada what he should do about a present for Peg's [Margaret King] twenty-first birthday; signed D.H.L.

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/69/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre ; bears a blue 1f50 stamp, postmarked [...] 16.1.30; the envelope has been numbered '21' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters and sub-numbered according to the letter which they originally contained.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/13.

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La Z 4/3/70/1 14.2.1930 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, 'Ad Astra', Vence, A-M, France to [Emily King]; 14 Feb. n.y. [1930].

Addresses her 'My dear Sister'; acknowledges letter from her and 'Peg' [Margaret King]; explains he had to give in to Dr Morland's insistence and come [to the sanatorium] as he was losing weight so badly every week that he had to do something at once; reports on his present fragile state of health as revealed by a 'careful x-ray examination'; describes himself as not in any 'sudden danger - but in slow danger'; comments on why he did not want them both to come to the 'little Beausoleil house'; suggests they wait to see how he gets on and perhaps meet in the spring; responds to her suggestion that he might have waited by asking whether she thinks he comes into a sanatorium for the 'fun of the thing?'; adds that when one feels so 'weak and down, one doesn't want to see anybody ... It would have been no fun for you'.

Reports that Frieda returns to Bandol on Monday to give up the Beau Soleil and take a house in Cagnes, which is 'just below' there, for a while; luckily will have 'Barby' [Barbara Weekley] with her; asks that she pass on his letter to Ada, 'so she understands too'; signed 'D.H.L.' Adds a postscript that neither of them need worry but there is need for him to take care.

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/3/70/2), addressed to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre; bears 3 red 50c stamps, postmarked 'ALPES-MAR[...] 16.[...].30'; the envelope was originally found with La Z 3/4/1.

Date: D.H. Lawrence moved to the sanatorium in Vence in February 1930.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 5/14.

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La Z 4/3/71 1929 (c) Envelope addressed to [Emily] King; c.1929

Envelope, addressed by D.H. Lawrence to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Angleterre; it is not postmarked and bears a blue 1f50 stamp.

The lack of a postmark makes it impossible to conclusively identify the letter which this envelope originally contained although evidence suggests that it is likely to have been La Z 4/3/55 [the French stamp and use of 'Angleterre' indicate the letter was sent from France; La Z 4/3/55 was sent from Paris 5 April 1929; 3 weeks later La Z 4/3/56, sent from Mallorca, was written on similar blue writing paper housed in an envelope of the same type as La Z 4/3/71].

The verso of the envelope has been given a pencil number '1' in an unknown hand; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters.

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La Z 4/3/72 1927-1929 (c) Envelope addressed to [Emily] King; c.1927=c.1929

Envelope, addressed by D.H. Lawrence to Mrs S. King, 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, England; it bears an illegible postmark and the stamp has been removed.

The lack of a postmark and stamp makes it impossible to conclusively identify the letter which this envelope originally contained.

The verso of the envelope has been given a pencil number '13' in an unknown hand; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters.

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La Z 4/3/73-74 8.1927-12.1927 Envelopes addressed to Emily King; Aug. 1927 and 17 Dec. 1927

Two envelopes, addressed by Frieda Lawrence to Mrs Emily King; La Z 4/3/73 is addressed 480 Main Street, Carlton, Nottingham, Inghilterra, bears a blue 1,25 Lire stamp and is postmarked 'SCANDICCI, FIRENZE [4].8.27'; La Z 4/3/74 is addressed 16 Brooklands Rd, Sneinton Hill, Nottingham, Inghilterra, bears a blue 1,25 Lire stamp and is postmarked 'FIRENZE, FERROVIA 17.xii.1927'.

The letters which these envelopes originally contained are not in the collection.

The envelopes have been numbered '6' and '19' in pencil on the verso; the envelopes for La Z 4/3/1-70 (letters from D.H. Lawrence to Emily King) were previously separated from the letters themselves and given an individual pencil number; as far as possible these envelopes have now been matched up with their corresponding letters.

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La Z 4/4 1929 Letters from D.H. Lawrence to Charles Lahr; 1929

A group of 3 letters written by D.H. Lawrence to Charles Lahr between 9 February 1929 and 15 June 1929; one of the letters is an incomplete print of a letter from Lawrence, printed by Lahr's Blue Moon Press.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 4/4.

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La Z 4/4/1 9.2.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Beau Rivage, Bandol, Var to Charles Lahr; Saturday n.d. [9 Feb. 1929]

Addresses him as 'Dear Lahr'; [Laurence] Pollinger is to instruct the lawyer to apply to the Home Office for the return of the 'two MSS' [of 'Pansies']; St John Hutchinson has 'several members [of parliament] willing to move, and they might even get Ramsay [MacDonald] to do it'; the 'man of Pegasus' [J. Holroyd-Reece] is hanging fire on the book 'owing to rumours in the press'; the poems ['Pansies'] are almost finished being typed and Jack Hutchinson wants a copy for the 'belligerent Members to read'; will send Lahr a new duplicate from the new typing; hopes [Rhys] Davies is not going to be 'hard up'; he is 'glad - or rather sad' to hear about Harold T. Mason but knows now why he said he has not sold any copies of Reflection on the Death of a Porcupine; Americans say 'he must have sold a good number'; would Lahr 'ask him for a copy' to 'see what he is doing'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'

The letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with the number 2 in the right hand corner.

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 7, p. 172 gives the date as 9 February 1929.

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La Z 4/4/2 10.6.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Principe Alfonso, Palma de Mallorca, Spain to Charles Lahr; 10 Jun. 1929.

Addresses him as 'Dear Lahr'; [Alfred] Knopf is trying to make Secker delay the date of publication for 'Pansies' and Secker is refusing; hopes Alfred [Knopf] has to now hurry to 'come out with the book'; will send him a sketch or two of his 'unhappy self' and a photograph 'it it comes out fit to be seen'; Frieda has sprained her foot so they are not 'fixing the date of leaving'; asks him to tell [Rhys] Davies that he asked Secker to send 'those proofs to Manor Park'; 'Kot' [S.S. Koteliansky] insists on 'the 3-guineas price' [for 'Lady Chatterley's Lover'] but he does not think so; trusts [Lahr] to take his fair share; asks who is the new Home Secretary; signed 'D.H.L.'

The letter has been annotated, in pencil in an unknown hand, with the number 10 in the right hand corner.

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La Z 4/4/3 15.6.1929 Printed edition of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Palma de Mallorca, Spain to Charles Lahr; 15 Jun. 1929

Addresses him as 'Dear Lahr'; his wife [Frieda] will come to London and bring the drawings and photographs for him to choose one he likes; he [Lawrence] likes 'the big head in red chalk done by myself' but Frieda thinks it 'awful' and prefers 'the seated figure drawings by Tom Jones' which he thinks 'rather trivial'; he [Lahr] can use a photograph is he wishes, [Lawrence] does not care but if he does use a drawing he is not to say that it is by [Lawrence]; signed 'D.H.L.'

Printed on a single sheet of paper; at the end is the note 'six copies printed by the BLUE MOON PRESS'; Warren Roberts, A Bibliography of D.H. Lawrence, notes that 10 or 12 copies were printed and given to friends, it was never sold; the letter was printed by Herbert Jones, the typographer, on a hand-press bought by Lahr in 1928 and previously owned by William Morris; Jones wished to try out a new type and Lahr handed him the Lawrence letter.

The printed letter is incomplete; the full version can be found in Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol. 7, pp. 333-34.

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La Z 4/5 1924-1950 Letters, postcards and notes from D.H. and Frieda Lawrence to Nancy Pearn; 1924-1950

A collection of 8 letters, 2 notes and 5 postcards written by D.H. and Frieda Lawrence to [Annie Ross] 'Nancy' Pearn, of Curtis Brown Ltd, London between 12 September 1924 and 14 August 1950.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 4/5.

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La Z 4/5/1 12.9.1924 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Del Monte Ranch, Questa, New Mexico to Miss Pearse [Nancy Pearn]; 12 Sep. 1924

Addresses her as 'Dear Miss Pearse'; is enclosing an article which he 'did for the Saturday Review - New York' [not present]; tells her to 'just show it to [John Middleton] Murry, to tease him'; describes the autumn weather and adds that he is going to Mexico to finish 'the novel' and that the 'novelette St Mawr is nearly typed out'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

The verso of the postcard bears a colour illustration with the printed caption 'Pueblo Indians Singing (Part of Corn Dance Ceremony), San Domingo, N. Mex.'; the recto of the card bears a longer explanation of the ceremonial dancing, printed in blue ink.

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La Z 4/5/2 5.10.1925 (c) Note from D.H. Lawrence, [Curtis Brown Ltd, London] to Nancy Pearn; n.d. [c.5 Oct. 1925]

Addresses her 'Dear Miss Pearn'; a short note left in person for 'Nancy' Pearn; he will 'gladly' write the book; is leaving for the Midlands on Wednesday so 'too bad for the Calendar?' [proposed meeting with the editor of the 'Calendar of Modern Letters']; he will call the next morning; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

Date: the note is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence gives the date as 5? October 1925 and remarks that the note was written on a working-day very close to the Lawrence's expected departure for the Midlands on Wednesday 7 October 1925.

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La Z 4/5/3 18.3.1927 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, [Florence] to Nancy Pearn; n.d. [18 Mar. 1927]

Gives the address in Rome where he will be staying from the next day for a fortnight; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

The postcard is addressed to 'Miss N. Pearn, Curtis Brown Ltd, 6 Henrietta Street, Londra WC 2'; it is postmarked FIRENZE FERROVIA 19.III.1927 and bears a red 75 Cent stamp; the verso of the postcard bears a black and white photograph of the Piazza Signora, Florence.

Date: the postcard is not dated but is postmarked 19 March 1927; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol V, p 657 gives the date as 18 March 1927.

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La Z 4/5/4 13.8.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Fischer, Villach, Kärnten, Austria to Nancy Pearn; 13 Aug. 1927

Addresses her as 'Dear Miss Pearn'; he will not return to Italy until mid-October as he must 'stay about 2000 ft above sea-level a bit'; advises her to go to the Villa Mirenda [Scandicci, Italy] and encloses a letter to the Wilkinsons [not present], the only neighbours; describes the Wilkinsons, 'vegetarians and a bit Bernard Shawey', they have a 'puppet show when they are in London' but they are nice; gives directions from Florence to the Villa and apologises that he will be away; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/5/5 28.12.1927 Letter from Frieda and D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda to Nancy Pearn; 12 Dec. 1927

Frieda begins the letter; addresses her as 'Dear Miss Pearn'; discusses the 'little cloth' which she [Pearn] gave them; Lawrence 'sees such things' whilst she [Frieda] has a 'passion for very nice little clothes'; asks where it was made; comments on her [Pearn's] visit [to Villa Mirenda, summer 1927] and is sad that she did not have 'really decent meals'; describes their Christmas tree and the peasants came and sang; the 'Wilkes' [Wilkinsons, from the neighbouring villa] are in Rome; Lawrence is 'much better' and she thinks 'peace and quiet is very good for him'; they had a 'nice lunch' with Michael Arlen, [George Norman] Douglas and 'a few others' and 'nobody said anything nasty about anybody else'; sends good wishes for the new year; signed 'Frieda Lawrence'.

D.H. Lawrence adds a short note at the end; addresses her as 'Dear Nancy Pearn'; comments on the 'pretty little Sachet', he feels like 'creeping inside it' and pretending he's 'a clean napkin instead of a sorry rag'; hopes she has had a 'jolly' Christmas and adds that 1928 must be 'a real good warm-hearted year' for her; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/5/6 12.6.1928 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Grenoble to Nancy Pearn; n.d. [12 Jun. 1928]

Gives the address to which he is moving the next day and asks that she gives it to the 'other depts'; it is 'so hot'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'

The postcard is addressed to 'Miss N. Pearn, c/o Curtis Brown Ltd, 6 Henrietta Street, Londres WC 2, Angleterre'; it is postmarked GRENOBLE 14.VI.28 and bears a red 90c stamp; the verso of the postcard bears a black and white photograph of 'Chambéry, Rue de Roche. La Savoie'

Date: the postcard is not dated but is postmarked 14 June 1928; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol VI, p 423 gives the date as 14 June 1928.

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La Z 4/5/7 9.8.1928 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Kesselmatte, Gsteig b. Gstaad (Bern), Switzerland to Nancy Pearn; n.d. [9 Jul. 1928]

Advises her of their move to a 'pleasant little chalet' [Kesselmatte]; describes the 'lovely' place and the 'fine weather'; perhaps he could do an 'Eve' [Eve: The Lady's Pictorial magazine] story among the mountains; must do the 'fourth of the Evening News articles' and will send the third; asks about her holiday plans and adds that there are few visitors 'in this region' but that it will fill up by the end of the month; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

The postcard is addressed to 'Miss N. Pearn, c/o Curtis Brown Ltd, 6 Henrietta Street, London WC 2, England'; it bears 2 10r stamps and is postmarked 'Gsetig bei Gstaad 9.vii.28; the postcard bears a small green printed drawing of mountains, with the caption 'ADELBODEN'.

Date: the card is undated but is postmarked 9 July 1928; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 6, p 453 gives the date as 9 July 1928.

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La Z 4/5/8 3.11.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, La Vigie, Ile de Port-Cros, Var to Nancy Pearn; 3 Nov. 1928

Addresses her as 'Dear Nancy Pearn'; encloses the proofs ['The Blue Moccasins', not present] and an article ['Is England Still a Man's Country?', not present]; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'; a pencil note in an unknown hand has added the title of the article at the end of the letter.

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La Z 4/5/9 19.2.1929 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, [Bandol] to Nancy Pearn; 19 Feb. n.y. [1929]

He has received the proofs of 'Mother and Daughter' and will send them, no alterations; adds that she may use anything of his for her 'Rotary Magazine' [Soroptimist monthly magazine for which Pearn was responsible]; signed 'D.H.L.'

The postcard is addressed to 'Miss N. Pearn, Curtis Brown Ltd, 6 Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, London WC 2'; it bears 2 50c stamps and is postmarked '[Bandol] 20.2.29; the verso of the postcard bears a black and white photograph of 'La Cote D'Azure - Bandol: Plage Renécros'.

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La Z 4/5/10 12.1928 (c) Letter from Frieda Lawrence, Hotel Beau Rivage, Bandol, Var, France to Nancy Pearn; n.d. [c.Dec. 1928]

Addresses her 'Dear Nancy Pearn'; has bought her a 'not very inspired Xmas present'; thanks her for 'fighting for Lorenzo's stuff' and adds that it is 'jolly' of her to like getting money for him [D.H. Lawrence]; if it weren't for her [Pearn] they would have only 'thin bread and scrape'; has been to Florence and 'threw the [Villa] Mirenda to the four winds', it was quite bitter to part with their things and the place; Lawrence is much better and has written a lot; encloses 3 poems [not present]; wishes her a Merry Christmas; urges her to 'keep on being a good friend to us' and hopes her mother is well; signed 'Frieda Lawrence'.

Date: the letter is undated; the Lawrences stayed at Hotel Beau Rivage, Bandol from 17 November 1928 until 11 March 1928; the letter is written shortly before Christmas.

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La Z 4/5/11 4.1929-6.1929 Letter from Frieda Lawrence, Hotel Principe Alfonso, Palma di Mallorca, Spain to Nancy Pearn; n.d. [c.Apr.1929-Jun. 1929]

Addresses her 'Dear Nancy Pearn'; is amused at the 'African gift turning into a Limoges little box' (see La Z 4/5/10) but 'Barby' [Weekley, Frieda's daughter] must have 'lost it or broke it'; they are having 'a good time' [in Palma, Mallorca] but do not 'love it like Italy'; the only 'fly in the ointment' is Lorenzo's [Lawrence's] health which occasionally 'turns into an elephant and swallows the ointment'; they live peacefully despite all the 'Lady C[hatterely] excitement'; asks about her holiday plans; signed 'Frieda Lawrence'.

Date: the letter is undated; the Lawrences stayed at the Hotel Principe Alfonso, Palma di Mallorca, Spain between 22 April 1929 and 18 June 1929.

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La Z 4/5/12 1930 (c) Letter from Frieda Lawrence, Villa Robermond, Quartier Chabert, Vence to Nancy Pearn; Thursday n.d. [c.1930]

Addresses her 'Dear Nancy Pearn'; thanks her for her letter and adds that Lawrence always appreciated her; describes the death of Lawrence, 'he knew it was the end, then he lay down and said 'I am better now' and soon breathed his last slow breaths'; his 'unconquerable spirit' has made her grief have 'no bitterness or misery in it'; she has had another blow as 'Barby' [Barbara Weekley, Frieda's daughter] has a 'tubercular bone' but she will be cured; comments on Lawrence's never making a will; is coming to England next week 'with death certificates and so on' and asks that she tells no one but [Laurence] Pollinger; describes the location of Lawrence's grave; signed 'Frieda L'; adds a postscript that 'everybody is so kind'.

Date: the letter is undated but was written soon after the death of D.H. Lawrence 2 March 1930.

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La Z 4/5/13 6.1930 (c) Note from Frieda Lawrence to Nancy Pearn; n.d. [c.Jun. 1930]

Note enclosing a review of 'Art Nonsense by Eric Gill' [not present]; outlines that Lawrence wrote the unfinished review a few days before his death and that 'it is the last thing he wrote'; signed 'Frieda Lawrence'.

Date: a pencil note at the bottom of the page reads 'NP 6/30 Just received from Frieda'; another pencil note reads 'July 3/33 - Copy sent Desmond Flower Book Collectors Quarterly' (the review was first published in The Book Collectors Quarterly, Oct-Dec 1933, see Roberts C212).

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La Z 4/5/14 1933 (c) Letter from Frieda Lawrence, Kiowa Ranch, San Christobal, New Mexico to Nancy Pearn; n.d. [c.1933]

Provides a background to the play 'The Fight for Barbara', written in the winter of 1912 at the Villa Igea, at Gargano on the Lago di Garda; the play is also set at the Villa Igea and was found by Frieda's sister [Else Jaffe] at her house in the Isarthal [Germany]; adds that Lawrence would have probably rewritten it had he seen it again but she cannot 'see it detachedly enough to be able to judge its value as a work of art'; signed 'Frieda Lawrence'; the letter is addressed on the verso of f 2 'Many greetings dear Nancy Pearn. I hope this is enough'.

Date: the letter is undated; it is assumed that the letter was written close to the first publication of the play 'The Fight for Barbara' (published as 'Keeping Barbara' in Argosy, 1933).

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La Z 4/5/15 14.8.1950 Letter from Frieda Lawrence, El Prado, New Mexico to Nancy Pearn; 14 Aug. 1950

Addresses her as 'Dear Nancy'; hopes that she is feeling 'quite well again' and adds that she deserves 'a good rest' after all her hard work; describes herself as 'an old bird now' but is 'flourishing'; she owes a lot to 'Lawrence and you' and is grateful; young people 'come and explain Lawrence' to her, she is glad he 'is alive to them' but 'sometimes it is too much'; sends 'much love'; signed 'Frieda Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/6 1914-1918 Transcripts of letters from D.H. Lawrence to J.B. Pinker; 1914-1918

Typescript transcripts of 41 letters written by D.H. Lawrence to James Brand Pinker between 8 July 1914 and 3 August 1918.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 4/6; where possible, the location of the original manuscripts have been given.

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La Z 4/6/1 8.7.1914 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, 9 Selwood Terrace, South Kensington, S.W. to J.B. Pinker; 8 Jul. 1914

Addresses him 'Dear Pinker'; refers to a request from Bertram Christian from 'Nisbet's' [James Nisbet and Co, publishing house] for a 'sort of interpretative essay on Thomas Hardy'; thinks 'it is all right' and will send the agreement on to him; asks if he has the MS of the novel ['The Rainbow'] from Methuen.

A typed manuscript copy of this letter is also held at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois and was cited by Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, as the source text of the letter.

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La Z 4/6/2 5.9.1914 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, The Triangle, Bellingdon Lane, Chesham, Bucks. to J.B. Pinker; 5 Sep. 1914

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; enquires if he [Pinker] is better after his accident; asks if he thinks Methuen will pay the £150 as he can 'last out here only another month'; describes the war as 'colossal idiocy' and adds that 'out of sheer rage' he has begun the book about Thomas Hardy which will be 'about anything but Thomas Hardy'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held by Archives and Special Collections, The State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/3 15.9.1914 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, The Triangle, Bellingdon Lane, Chesham, Bucks. to J.B. Pinker; 15 Sep. 1914

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; has asked his sister [Ada Clarke] to send a duplicate copy of the complete 'Honor and Arms'; he was 'furious' at the English Review for 'cutting the thing down'; would be glad for it to be 'appear' in America and asks whether they may also take 'Vin Ordinaire' which appeared in the English Review and was 'also of German soldiery'; has heard nothing from Mitchell Kennerley but Amy Lowell has 'promised to go and attack him in New York'; Austin Harrison is advising him [Lawrence] to 'go to Stanley Unwin' with some work and asks if Pinker knows 'anything of him'; he is doing the book, 'more or less a propos of Thomas Hardy's characters' which he promised to Nisbet.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Rare Books and Manuscripts Library, Columbia University, New York (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/4 29.10.1914 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Bellingdon Lane, Chesham, Bucks. to J.B. Pinker; 29 Oct. 1914

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; does not feel 'quite in the humour for tackling the novel' ['The Rainbow'] and will do it in a months time; has received the £50 from the Royal Literary Fund; has heard nothing from [Mitchell] Kennerl[e]y but Amy Lowell is calling on him on his [Lawrence's] behalf in New York.

Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, cites this manuscript copy as its source for the text of the letter.

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La Z 4/6/5 5.12.1914 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Bellingdon Lane, Chesham, Bucks. to J.B. Pinker; 5 Dec. 1914

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; sends the 'first hundred or so pages' of 'The Rainbow' [not present], describes it as 'a beautiful piece'; asks if he needs to type it as he never did for Duckworth; is glad of the war as it 'kicks the pasteboard bottom in the usual good popular novel'; believes people will either read 'sheer rubbish, or something that has in it as much or more emotional force as the newspaper has in it today'; [Compton] Mackenzie is 'a fool' for not realising that 'the times are too serious to bother about his Sinister Street frippery'; comments that if [E.V.] Lucas reads 'The Rainbow' then he 'ought to know how good it is'; gives details of when and how he will send Pinker 'The Rainbow'; thinks 'The Rainbow' a better title than 'The Wedding Ring', 'especially in these times' and describes [Edward] Garnett as 'a devil' for calling his book 'The Prussian Officer'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/6 1.2.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Greatham, Pulborough, Sussex to J.B. Pinker; 1 Feb. 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; wishes he had 'done the novel' ['The Rainbow'] but will finish it by the end of February; Viola Meynell will type it; he felt 'seedy in Bucks.' but is getting better and 'can even hope beyond the war now'; asks if Pinker wrote to [Mitchell] Kennerley about 'the book of short stories'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/7 24.2.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Greatham, Pulborough, Sussex to J.B. Pinker; 24 Feb. 1915

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; urges Pinker to get him some money; he is 'very near the end of the novel' ['the Rainbow'] but [Viola] Meynell is 'somewhat behind with the typing'; asks if it is definitely too late for spring publication as he hears 'how phenomenally well novels are doing'; asks if Methuen is ready 'to back up this novel'; knows there will be a fight before his novels 'are admitted' but 'the field is there to conquer'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/8 23.4.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Greatham, Pulborough, Sussex to J.B. Pinker; 23 Apr. 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; hopes he [Pinker] is 'willing to fight for this novel' ['The Rainbow']; is afraid that there are 'parts of it Methuen won't want to publish'; he [Lawrence] 'will take out sentences and phrases' but not 'paragraphs or pages'; believes that a novel 'has a definitive organic form' and that to alter it is like asking a man to 'cut off his nose because the public won't like it'; he is very short of money and is depending on Pinker to get him 'something'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/9 31.5.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Greatham, Pulborough, Sussex to J.B. Pinker; 31 May 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; sends 'the final batch of the MS of the Rainbow' [not present] and adds information and instructions regarding the page and chapter numbering; hopes that he [Pinker] 'will like the book' and that it is not 'very improper'; is sorry to have his 'beloved book' printed and wishes he could hold off publishing 'yet a while'; gives instructions for the flyleaf inscription 'zu Else' in gothic letters.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, Connecticut (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/10 8.6.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Pulborough, to J.B. Pinker; n.d. [8 Jun. 1915]

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; refers to money which Pinker has for him and also asks about the £150 from Methuen; asks him [Pinker] to inform R. Garnett about the 'arrangement' with Methuen.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, p 356 gives the date as 8 June 1915.

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La Z 4/6/11 13.7.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Greatham, Pulborough, to J.B. Pinker; 13 Jul. 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; thanks him for selling the story ['England, My England']; he is very busy and will write more soon.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas at Austin (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, p 356 gives the date as 13 June 1915.

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La Z 4/6/12 26.7.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Greatham, Pulborough, to J.B. Pinker; 26 Jul. 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; sends back the 'slips and pages' [from 'The Rainbow', not present]; discusses the cuts he has made and those he cannot 'because they are living parts of any organic whole'; tells Methuen that the novel will 'pay him back ... before very long'; describes himself as 'a safe speculation for a publisher'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/13 16.10.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, 1 Byron Villas, Vale-of-Health, Hampstead, London to J.B. Pinker; Sunday 16 Oct. n.y. [1915]

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; short note asking to see him 'Wednesday or Thursday of this week'.

Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, cites this manuscript copy as its source for the text of the letter.

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, p 356 gives the date as 16 October 1915.

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La Z 4/6/14 6.11.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, 1 Byron Villas, Vale-of-Health, Hampstead, London to J.B. Pinker; 6 Nov. 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; comments on the 'magistrates and the Rainbow'; he is 'not very much moved' but curses them all; if he [Pinker] thinks it a 'good and wise proceeding' for Hübsch to publish ['The Rainbow'] in America the 'let him publish it'; hopes to be going to Florida soon; it is the end of his 'writing for England' and he wants to try and change his public.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Harry Ransom Research Center, University of Texas at Austin (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/15 6.11.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, 1 Byron Villas, Vale-of-Health, Hampstead, London to J.B. Pinker; 6 Nov. 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; asks to see him 'at once: on Monday morning'; asks that he [Pinker] telephones Dollie Radford to leave a message; they 'must do something on this suppression business'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/16 16.11.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, 1 Byron Villas, Vale-of-Health, Hampstead, London to J.B. Pinker; 16 Nov. 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; discusses arrangements for lunch; he and Frieda intend to sail for New York; asks if [Pinker] has 'some letter of introduction' for him.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/17 17.11.1915 TS copy of a postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Hampstead to J.B. Pinker; Wednesday n.d. [17 Nov. 1915]

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; asks [Pinker] to send a copy of his 'agreement with Methuen' to Phillip Morrell; Morrell is going to 'ask a question tomorrow, in the House of Commons, about the Rainbow'; adds that 'Henry James [1843-1916, writer] might be very useful' and asks if he [James] has read the book.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, Connecticut (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, p 439 gives the date as 17 November 1915

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La Z 4/6/18 17.11.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, 1 Byron Villas, Vale-of-Health, Hampstead, London to J.B. Pinker; 17 Nov. 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; cannot believe that the Authors Society will 'do anything'; confirms that he received no notice of the suppression of 'the Rainbow'; has had letters from 'a lot of people about the Rainbow' including Oliver Lodge; wishes he could go to America and asks whether he must 'stay for the proceedings about the Rainbow'.

The original manuscript of this letter is in the possession of Mr John Martin (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/19 4.12.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, 1 Byron Villas, Vale-of-Health, Hampstead, N.W. to J.B. Pinker; 4 Dec. 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; it 'seems The Rainbow is going to struggle out of the cloud of obscurity after all'; will let him have the galley-proofs and wishes he had the revised proofs, fears they have gone to Russia; asks if he [Pinker] is going on with the 'protest from the authors' [against the suppression of 'The Rainbow']; encloses a letter from Paris [not present].

Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, cites this manuscript copy as its source for the text of the letter.

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La Z 4/6/20 14.12.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, 1 Byron Villas, Vale-of-Health, Hampstead, N.W. to J.B. Pinker; 14 Dec. 1915

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; discusses possible titles for [Twilight in Italy], suggests 'Studies of Restless Italy', 'An Italian Winter', 'Uneasy Italy', 'Studies of Italian Restlessness'; hears that Huebsch is sailing on the Peace ship (the Oscar II, chartered by Henry Ford in an effort to bring World War I to a peaceful settlement); asks when they are publishing 'The Rainbow'; has heard that The Metropolitan Magazine 'was praising the book enthusiastically'.

Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, cites this manuscript copy as its source for the text of the letter.

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La Z 4/6/21 18.12.1915 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, 1 Byron Villas, Vale-of-Health, Hampstead, N.W. to J.B. Pinker; Saturday n.d. [18 Dec. 1915]

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; lists omissions from the American edition of 'The Rainbow' which make him 'sad and angry'; suggests that if they buy sheets from America to 'bind here' then they should print pages from the Methuen edition containing the text omitted from the American edition to 'insert at the back'; suggest they also 'put a report of the process - the suppression - at the end of the book'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, p 480 gives the date as 18 December 1915.

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La Z 4/6/22 23.12.1915 TS copy of a postcard from D.H. Lawrence, [103 Hampstead Walk] to J.B. Pinker; Thursday n.d. [23 December 1915]

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; asks him to tell Duckworth [publisher] that he [Lawrence] 'won't have hours' [in the title of his book of essays on Italy] and suggests 'Italian Days' if 'no one else has had it'.

A typed manuscript copy of this letter is also held at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois and was cited by Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, as the source text of the letter.

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, p 480 gives the date as 18 December 1915.

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La Z 4/6/23 1.1.1916 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Porthcothan, St. Merryn, Padstow, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 1 Jan. 1916

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; is staying at J.D. Beresford's house for which he is very grateful; 'already here in Cornwall it is better' and he feels 'outside the England of London'; is satisfied if Duckworths call his book 'Italian Days', but also suggests 'Italian Hours' as an alternative; admits that he has lost his American version of 'Rainbow', which he had intended to send Pinker; enquires about its re-publication.

The original of this letter is also held by the University of Nottingham, see La C 1.

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La Z 4/6/24 2.2.1916 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Porthcothan, St. Merryn, North Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 2 Feb. 1916

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; encloses the 'complete MS of the poems' ['Amores', not present] and a duplicate will be sent by Lady Ottoline Morrell, 'that can go to America'; the proofs of the Italian sketches will 'all be done by Friday'; asks whether the 'Italian Days' will published in America at all.

Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, cites this manuscript copy as its source for the text of the letter.

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La Z 4/6/25 7.2.1916 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Porthcothan, St. Merryn, North Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 7 Feb. 1916

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; encloses a letter from Sidgwick and Jackson [not present] and comments that this year they have done better than ever and 'mainly through poetry'; advises Pinker to speak to Duckworths first and then 'Sidgwick might be rather nice'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Harry Ransom Research Center, University of Texas at Austin (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2)

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La Z 4/6/26 12.2.1916 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Porthcothan, St. Merryn, North Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 12 Feb. 1916

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; refers to his [Pinker's] letter; discusses Constable and Sidgwick [publishers, both were considering publishing 'Amores'], he likes 'the idea of Sidgwick' and awaits 'their answers'.

Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, cites this manuscript copy as its source for the text of the letter.

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La Z 4/6/27 25.2.1916 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Porthcothan, St. Merryn, N. Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 25 Feb. 1916

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; has received a letter from Sidgwick refusing his poems and giving 'an unasked and very impertinent criticism of the MS. ['Amores'] together with instructions as to how to write poetry'; asks that if Constable refuses the MS also, then he is to send it back to him [Lawrence] but to send the duplicate to America; adds that 'the world is so foul' and he would like to escape 'into the furthest corner, from the smell of it'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Harry Ransom Research Center, University of Texas at Austin (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2)

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La Z 4/6/28 1.3.1916 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, The Tinners Arms, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 1 Mar. 1916

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; has some friends who want to publish 'The Rainbow' by subscription, supposes it would be done in conjunction with Paul Ferdinando of whom he knows nothing but 'he has a nice and brigand-like name'; feels mean about 'dear old Duckworths', 'going to somebody else and then coming back upon refusal'; asks whether he can try the poems ['Amores'] in America and if anything has happened about 'The Rainbow' in America; adds that Amy Lowell has been speaking to people in America about his poems and says that Ferris Green[s]let has authorised him to say to Constables that if they publish the book of poems in England, then Houghton Mifflin would order 200 copies for America.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/29 28.3.1916 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Higher Tregerthen, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 28 Mar. 1916

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; sends the agreement for the poems [not present]; asks if he [Pinker] thinks the title 'Amores' is 'all right'; comments on the book's format and binding; adds that they have settled in their own cottage and it costs only £5 a year.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Harry Ransom Research Center, University of Texas at Austin (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2)

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La Z 4/6/30 31.10.1916 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Higher Tregerthen, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 31 Oct. 1916

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; sends him the conclusion of 'Women in Love' [not present]; [Frieda] Lawrence wants it to be called 'Dies Irae' ['Day of Wrath']; it is finished apart from a 'sort of epilogue' which he will write later.

Sends a story called 'The Mortal Coil' [not present] which he describes as 'first-class' but 'not destined ... to land on the golden strand'; promises that he 'will write sweet simple tales yet' and wishes Guy Thorne [pseud. of C.E.R. Gull, 1876-1923] would lend 'his mantle' or Lady [Mary Elizabeth] Russell 'her muff'; he 'wrestles' with his 'angel' but 'cannot get him to give me proper spirit'; will go to Italy when he has 'written those stories which are as yet unwritten'; adds that The English Review might print 'The Mortal Coil' as may 'those last Americans who wrote me the cent-a-worders'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, Connecticut (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2).

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La Z 4/6/31 16.1.1917 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 16 Jan. 1917

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; discusses plans for going to New York and thanks Pinker for promising to help; asks that Pinker give him 'some sort of credentials' which say that it is necessary for him to be in New York for the publishing of 'Twilight in Italy', 'The Rainbow' and 'Women in Love'; feels that he 'must be under a new sky', 'to start somehow afresh'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, Connecticut (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 3).

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La Z 4/6/32 20.2.1917 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 20 Feb. 1917

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; comments that Hermione [from 'Women in Love'] is 'not much more like Ottoline Morrell than Queen Victoria'; there is 'a hint of her in the character of Hermione but so there is a hint of a million women'; believes that 'they haven't half a leg to stand on' if they make a libel case; it is no use trying to publish the novel 'in this state of affairs' as 'the world is mad' and has 'violent rabies which makes it turn on anything true, with frenzy'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, Connecticut (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 3).

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La Z 4/6/33 3.4.1917 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 3 Apr. 1917

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; has decided to send him the MS. of poems ['Look! We Have Come Through'] which is 'the best' of his poetry; feels there is on haste to get it published and the 'Reality of Peace' seems more important; asks whether he has heard from [Austin] Harrison; has received Seven Arts with 'The Thimble' story and The Metropolitan Magazine containing 'England, My England'.

The original manuscript of this letter is in the possession of Mr W. Forster (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 3).

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La Z 4/6/34 24.7.1917 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 24 Jul. 1917

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; has heard from a women in Paris [Esther Andrews] who is collecting material for the New York Seven Arts magazine; she particularly wants fiction of his; asks Pinker to send MS. either to her or the New York office.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the New York Public Library (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 3).

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La Z 4/6/35 3.8.1917 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 3 Aug. 1917

Addresses him as 'Dear Pinker'; acknowledges his letter and the poems and comments 'Truly the ways and the taste of publishers is mysterious and beyond finding out'; the only thing he feels strongly about is 'Song of a Man who is Loved' and asks if he can explain why they [Chatto and Windus] want it omitted [from 'Look! We Gave Come Through']; is sure Alice Meynell would print it 'without reproach'; does not want to omit the poem and sends a copy; asks Pinker to convince them they are 'absurd on this point'; is prepared to omit 'Meeting Among the Mountains' if they so wish but wants to know why; mentions it has already been printed in the English Review [Feb 1914] and in Georgian Poetry [ed. E.Marsh, 1915], the latter having a very big public, according to sales.

Will alter the lines but considers it will 'spoil the clarity and precision of the expression for some of them'; will 'look after ...bad taste' in 'Eves Mass' and 'Candlemas' [renamed 'Birth Night' and 'Valentine's Night']; urges him again to convince them that 'Song of A man who is Loved' is beautiful, necessary, and 'innocuous as a sprig of mignonette'; requests details of their objections and is insistent the poem should not be omitted.

In a postscript asks if anyone wants to publish 'Reality of Peace' as a little book or pamphlet, four numbers of which were in the English Review; notes that if Chatto leaves out 'Meeting Among the Mountains' he must omit all reference to Georgian Poetry which name he feels sure gives a 'good deal of sanction among a certain class'; in a further postscript states he has already changed all the lines and the two titles and only the two poems remain to be decided on; does not feel strongly about 'Meeting', as he does about the other ['Song of a Man..'].

The original manuscript of this letter is in the possession of Mr W. Forster (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 3).

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La Z 4/6/36 14.8.1917 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 14 Aug. 1917

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; sends him the MS. of the poems ['Look! We Have Come Through', not present] and has taken out the two poems ('Song of a Man Who is Loved' and 'Meeting among the Mountains'); describes publishers as 'fools' 'but it is not worth while making a real breach'; has heard nothing from Cecil Palmer to say he has received the MS of the novel ['Women in Love'].

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 3).

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La Z 4/6/37 21.8.1917 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; Tuesday n.d. [21 Aug. 1917]

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; sends copies of the two omitted poems ['Song of a Man Who is Loved' and 'Meeting among the Mountains', not present] to be inserted in the 'American set'; Cecil Palmer is returning the MS of the novel ['Women in Love'] and he [Palmer] regrets he cannot afford to publish it privately; was wondering about Blackwell of Oxford as 'they are rich and have an enormous clientele'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in Archives and Special Collections, State University of New York at Buffalo (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 3).

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 3, p 149 gives the date as 21 August 1917.

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La Z 4/6/38 30.8.1917 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; 30 Aug. 1917

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; returns Chatto's agreement [for 'Look, We Have Come Through!', not present] and asks whether they could have 'had 20 % after the first 1000 or 2000'; also comments that he would like 12 rather than 6 presentation copies; is sending 'At the Gates', it is 'pure metaphysics'; discusses 'a set of essays' on 'The Transcendental Element in American Literature' ['Studies in Classic American Literature']; was thinking of speaking to Amy Lowell about them, her brother is principal of Harvard and 'she can touch the pulse of the Yale Review'.

Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, cites this manuscript copy as its source for the text of the letter.

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La Z 4/6/39 3.10.1917 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Zennor, St. Ives, Cornwall to J.B. Pinker; Wednesday n.d. [3 Oct. 1917]

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; sends the essays on 'Love' and 'Life' [not present]; describes them as 'quite magazinable' and believes [Austin] Harrison would publish them in the English Review; has returned 'all the proofs of the poems' ['Look! We Have Come Through'] to Chatto and Windus; believes it will be 'a nice book'; he will be 'mad' if he is charged for proof corrections since the only serious ones were the fault of the printer's 'not having followed the MS'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Harry Ransom Research Center, University of Texas at Austin (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 3)

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 3, p 165 gives the date as 3 October 1917.

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La Z 4/6/40 11.7.1918 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Mountain Cottage, Middleton-by-Wirksworth, Derby. to J.B. Pinker; 11 Jul. 1918

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; wonders if he can 'try and place' a 'little volume' of poetry by Leigh Henry called 'Poems of a Prisoner', for his wife [Nancy] Henry; if not, he [Lawrence] will send them to 'Duckworth - or somebody'; asks if he has had success with the 'Coming Awake' poems, wonders if Secker will do them.

A typed manuscript copy of this letter is also held at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois and was cited by Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 2, as the source text of the letter.

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La Z 4/6/41 3.8.1918 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Mountain Cottage, Middleton-by-Wirksworth, Derby. to J.B. Pinker; 3 Aug. 1918

Addresses him as 'My dear Pinker'; is sending him the first of the 'Studies in Classic American Literature' and 'there are six or seven more'; thinks they may 'really make something with them' and feels that they will 'make all the difference'; urges Pinker to send them to [Austin] Harrison and hopes he may print [in the English Review] quickly; asks that Pinker help with them 'as much as possible'.

The original manuscript of this letter is held in the Harry Ransom Research Center, University of Texas at Austin (see Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 3)

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La Z 4/7 1911-1970 Letters from D.H. Lawrence to Martin Secker and items relating to their publication; 1911-1970

Typescript and printed copies of letters written by D.H. Lawrence to Martin Secker between 1911 and 1930; also items relating to the publication of the letters in 1970 and a single autograph postcard from D.H. Lawrence to Martin Secker, 1928.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 4/7.

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La Z 4/7/1 12.6.1911-9.1.1930 Volume of TS copies of letters from D.H. Lawrence to Martin Secker; 12 Jun. 1911-9 Jan. 1930

A bound volume containing Martin Secker's original typescript transcriptions of c.200 letters written by D.H. Lawrence to him between 12 June 1911 and 9 January 1930; the text has been marked up for the printing of Letters from D.H. Lawrence to Martin Secker 1911-1930, published 1970.

Pasted inside the front cover of the volume is Martin Secker's bookplate, beneath this is a note signed 'Martin Secker'; a black and white photograph has been pasted onto f 1r showing D.H. Lawrence seated on a rock with a landscape in the background, it is captioned in Secker's hand 'DHL at Spotorno. 1926 photo.MS'.

The letters have been annotated in pencil with instructions to the printers and have been numbered I-CXCVI; pages have been numbered 1-224 in black marker; corrections to the text have been added in ink and pencil with notes to the printer added in black marker; p 115 bears a red ink note in the hand of Rina Secker regarding the Villa Bernarda, it has been cancelled; letters on pp 90, 99, 152, 169, 202 and 212 have been cancelled and marked 'OMIT', they were not present in the published version (see La Z 4/7/2); 4 additional letters have been transcribed in the hand of Martin Secker on pp 132r, 140v-139r, 140v and 141v.

Loosely inserted in the front of the volume are: La Z 4/7/1/2 - galley proofs of the notes for the printed text; La Z 4/7/1/3 - 2 copies of a page of typescript notes about the volume, on Bertram Rota Ltd headed notepaper, one of the pages has been annotated by George Lazarus with a list of variations between the typescript and printed text; La Z 4/7/1/4 - note by Martin Secker re the omission of letters on pp 169-70 from the printed text; La Z 4/7/1/5 - note by George Lazarus giving pages nos of letters omitted from the printed version; La Z 4/7/1/6 - letter from J.T. Boulton, University of Birmingham to George Lazarus, 9 Dec. 1986 confirming that letters dated 8 Aug. 1926 (p 132r), 23 Nov. 1926 (pp 140v-139r), [26 Nov. 1926] (p 140v) and 6 Dec. 1926 (p 141v) are in the hand of Martin Secker; La Z 4/7/1/7 - printed note on a card 'TMSC from Lawrence to Martin Secker in the possession of George Lazarus'.

The originals of most of the letters in this volume are now in the possession of the Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington.

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La Z 4/7/2 1970 Proof copy of 'Letters from D.H. Lawrence to Martin Secker 1911-1930'; 1970

Proof copy of Letters from D.H. Lawrence to Martin Secker 1911-1930, privately published in a limited edition of 500 copies c.October 1970; the volume contains letters written by D.H. Lawrence to Martin Secker between 12 Jun. 1911-9 Jan. 1930, a number of items present in the typescript volume (La Z 4/7/1/1) are omitted from the printed version; the letters are numbered I-CXCVI and follow the sequence of those in the original typescript volume (La Z 4/7/1/1); the text has been annotated throughout with corrections and notes to the printer; f 6r contains a printed statement of limitation and f 7r contains a short printed note by Martin Secker.

The originals of most of the letters in this volume are now in the possession of the Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington.

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La Z 4/7/3 1970 Trial copies of the binding case and paper used for 'Letters from D.H. Lawrence to Martin Secker 1911-1930', and related items; [1970]

La Z 4/7/3/1 - trial copy of the binding case for 'Letters from D.H. Lawrence to Martin Secker 1911-1930'; bound in brown buckram and lettered in gilt on the spine with D.H. Lawrence's phoenix on the front cover; Martin Secker has annotated the cover to include a colophon at the base of the spine and has indicated that the lettering should move to the top of the spine; inside the case is a note, initialled 'MS' and dated 23 March 1970; La Z 4/7/3/2 is a second trial copy of the binding case on which the changes have been made (colophon added and lettering moved); the printers' stamps for the colophon and lettering have been attached inside this case, the Lawrence Phoenix stamp is not present.

La Z 4/7/3/3/1 - dummy copy of the book including a dust-jacket and 160 blank pages; loosely inserted within this volume is a copy of the frontispiece showing a photograph of D.H. Lawrence at Spotorno 1926 (La Z 4/7/3/3/2); also inserted are 2 invoices from Clark, Doble and Brendon Limited, The Oakfield Press, Plymouth, Devon to Martin Secker (La Z 4/7/3/3/3-4) and a printed postcard, sent to Martin Secker 15 Sep. 1970, advertising the book on which the release date has been amended from July to October 1970 (La Z 4/7/3/3/5); f 2 of the book has been annotated in the hand of Martin Secker with financial calculations regarding the printing of the volume.

Additional items found with the above items are 3 copies of an advertisement from The Bookseller 7 February 1970 announcing the publication of Letters from D.H. Lawrence to Martin Secker 1911-1930 (La Z 4/7/3/4) and a photograph used for the frontispiece (La Z 4/7/3/5, a negative exists for this photograph); the photograph is in a paper mount card, the verso has been annotated with instructions for the wording and layout of the caption, used for the frontispiece to the book.

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La Z 4/7/4 7.8.1928 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, [Gsteig bei Gstaad, Switzerland] to Martin Secker; 7 Aug. n.y. [1928]

Has signed the sheets [signed copies of Collected Poems] and returned them; asks if Secker wants to see The False Prince ['Der Falsche Prinz' by Harry Domela]; signed 'D.H.L.'

The postcard is addressed to 'Martin Secker, 5 John St, Adelphi, London WC 2, England'; it bears a 20r stamp and is postmarked 'Gsetig bei Gstaad 7.viii.28; the postcard bears a small red printed drawing of mountains, with the caption 'JULIER-PASS'.

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La Z 4/8 1913-1933 Letters from D.H. and Frieda Lawrence to various correspondents; 1913-1933

Autograph letters written mainly by D.H. Lawrence to a variety of correspondents between 1913 and 1930 with a number of letters from Frieda Lawrence to various recipients.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 4/8.

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La Z 4/8/1/1 18.11.1927 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci, Firenze to Richard Aldington and 'Arabella' [Dorothy Yorke]; 18 Nov. 1927

Addresses them as 'Dear Richard and Arabella'; he has been ill but is now 'chirping up a bit', nothing 'enrages' him like getting well; rejects their offer of money as he 'damn well ought to have enough to live on'; comments that Scott Moncreiff will write them and has 'an obscene mind like a lavatory'; met [Dikran] Kouyoumidjian (former name of Michael Arlen) and asks if they know him; discusses his [Arlen's] having been ill and describes him as 'sort of outcast'; likes him and compares him to [John] Cournos [1881-1966, Russian author and editor], he is 'not pious and jesusy'.

Addresses Arabella regarding 'that apron', will send one when one comes 'within reach'; he has learnt to play patience at cards; asks Richard if he sold the 2 editions of 'that pamphlet' ['D.H. Lawrence: An Indiscretion'] as he has seen it quoted; remarks that most people look on him as 'a queer sort of animal in a cage'; discusses possible travel plans and asks after Arabella's garden; adds that if he is ever 'hard-up' he will 'make richer people fob out'; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/8/1/2 31.7.1928 Letter from Frieda Lawrence, Kesselmatte, Gsteig bei Gstaad, Bern to Richard Aldington; Tuesday n.d. [31 Jul. 1928]

Frieda Lawrence begins, addresses him as 'Dear Richard'; comments on the 'horrified' response of people to 'Lady C[hatterley's Lover]' and on Aldington's 'appreciative letter'; describes the novel as 'a triumph, so there!'; Lawrence is 'really getting better - but it is slow work'; sends love; signed 'Frieda'; adds a postscript that Aldington's 'was the first pleased letter and only about 4 more'.

A note written by D.H. Lawrence follows Frieda's postscript and describes responses to ['Lady Chatterley's Lover'] as 'pellets of icy disapproval'; adds that he is 'glad to lose the fag end' of his friends.

Date: the letter is undated; The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol VI, p 485 gives the date as 31 July 1928.

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La Z 4/8/1/3 8.8.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, [Kesselmatte, Gsteig bei Gstaad, Switzerland] to Richard Aldington; Wed n.d. [8 Aug. 1928]

Addresses him as 'Dear Richard'; discusses responses to 'Lady C[hatterley]' from 'hypocrites and narrow-gutted pigeons'; urges Aldington to 'stick to' thinking the book 'a feather in the cap of the 20th century' and not to become 'minchionato' like the rest of the 'be-shitten world'; asks whether 'Arabella' [Dorothy Yorke] received her copy of 'Lady C' and also whether Aldington will be taking some copies from Kot. [S.S. Koteliansky]; requests that he does not 'peddle them' but keep them as a 'nest-egg'; signed 'D.H.L.'

Date: the letter is undated; The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol VI, p 497 gives the date as 8 August 1928.

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La Z 4/8/1/4 17.8.1928 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Kesselmatte, Gsteig b. Gstaad, Bern to Richard Aldington; 17 Aug. 1928

Addresses him as 'Dear Richard'; gives names and addresses for 5 orders [of 'Lady Chatterley's Lover']; he will get Kot. [S.S. Kotenliansky] to send out orders 'from his 19 copies' when he returns and Mrs [Enid] Hilton has 'exhausted hers'; signed 'D.H.L.'

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La Z 4/8/1/5 28.9.1928 Letter-card from D.H. Lawrence, [Hotel Löwen, Lichtenthal, bei Baden-Baden] to Richard Aldington; Thursday 28 Sep. 1928

Addresses him as 'Dear Richard'; he will probably go to the Grand Hotel, Le Lavandou near Hyères [France] and will meet him in Hyères; adds that he has a cold; signed 'D.H.L.'; adds a note that he thinks one can sail from Le Lavandou to Port-Cros.

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La Z 4/8/2 17.11.1917 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, 44 Mecklenburgh Square, WC1 [London] to [Lady Cynthia Asquith]; Saturday [17 Nov. 1917].

Regrets that she is unable to join them for a meal the next day; invites her to join them for a 'scrap' on Tuesday and gives directions for reaching them by No.18 bus or from Russell Square tube station; draws a sketch of the immediate route; has received a letter from the War Office refusing him permission to return to Cornwall which leaves him 'very mad, but not shaken'; is determined to return; asks how many people she has asked for Tuesday [to see Mozart's 'Seraglio']; enquires about [Robert] Nicholls' health; asks if they could bring along a Miss [Dorothy] Yorke 'American girl - elegant but poor' who lives in the house and whom they like very much.

Mentions having lunched with John Galsworthy the previous day, 'sawdust bore'; feels the possibility of 'some happiness' for all soon - a 'certain jolliness creeping up from the unknown'; urges her not to be late on Tuesday; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'; adds a note that Frieda is making an evening dress.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 6/5.

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La Z 4/8/3/1 21.4.1918 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Chapel Farm Cottage, Hermitage nr Newbury, Berks. to Cyril W. Beaumont; 21 Apr. 1918

Addresses him as 'Dear Beaumont'; sends him the MS [of 'Bay', book of poems, not present], he [Beaumont] 'may as well have it' since it was made for him; asks whether he will send a copy of 'New Paths' ['New Paths: Verse, Prose, Pictures, 1917-1918', published by Beaumont May 1918 and containing 2 poems by Lawrence]; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/3/2 18.6.1919 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Chapel Farm Cottage, Hermitage nr Newbury, Berks. to Cyril W. Beaumont; 18 Jun. 1919

Addresses him as 'Dear Beaumont'; returns the MS ['Bay', not present] and has altered 'the Hyde Park' ['Guards, A Review in Hyde Park', poem from 'Bay']; urges Beaumont not to be 'very long setting up' as he would like to see the book before he leaves England; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/3/3 20.5.1922 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, S.S. [Malwa] to Cyril W. Beaumont; 20 May 1922

Addresses him as 'Dear Beaumont'; he would have liked to do an introduction to Richard Aldington's Goldoni play [translation of Carlo Goldoni, Le Donne di Buon' Umore] but 'now it will be too late and complicated'; refers him to Curtis Brown, his agent, regarding the poems; asks if he has seen 'Tortoises' that [Thomas] Seltzer 'brought out in America' and suggests Beaumont might like to 'do' that; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'

The letter is written from on board the P & O.S.N.Co. [Peninsular and Orient Steam Navigation Company] S.S. Malwa off the coast of Australia; Lawrence sailed from West Australia 18 May 1922, stopped in Adelaide 22 May 1922 and arrived in Sydney 27 May 1922.

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La Z 4/8/4 30.11.1915 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Garsington Manor, Oxford to Prince Bibesco; 30 Nov. 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Prince Bibesco'; his agent [J.B.] Pinker knows Conard [Parisian publisher] 'personally' so can probably 'bring off' publishing 'The Rainbow' in Paris; would be glad if Prince Bibesco would also write to Conard to 'persuade him'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/5/1 20.9.1922 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Taos, New Mexico, U.S.A. to Curtis Brown; 20 Sep. 1922

Addresses him as 'Dear Curtis Brown'; he has been 'motoring in Apache country' for 5 days, thinks he will stay in Taos all winter; thanks him for the 'account rendered' and he will instruct Duckworth to send accounts to him [Brown]; has finished 'Kangaroo' and will send it once he has revised the typescript from [Robert] Mountsier; stresses that [Martin] Secker 'ought not to publish the three novelettes until they are through here'; Hearsts International Magazine are printing 'The Captain's Doll' and Mountsier is trying to place 'Ladybird'; comments on the little money he gets from publishing in England, 'not enough to pay my steamer fare or even my house rent'; advises Brown that if he does not want to 'handle' his books 'then leave them'.

Basil Blackwell may publish his Verga translations 'Mastro-don Gesualdo' and 'Novelle Rusticane'; he will do a story for Secker's Short Story book but adds that 'Wintry Peacock' is 'pledged till 1923'; hopes letters will only take '10 days or a fortnight'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/5/2 10.2.1923 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Del Monte Ranch, Questa, New Mexico, U.S.A. to Curtis Brown; 10 Feb. 1923

Addresses him as 'Dear Curtis Brown'; he is glad [Martin] Secker is 'doing Sea and Sardinia on his own account'; is annoyed that 'those Hearst people' [Hearsts International Magazine] are holding back 'The Captain's Doll' until 'at least June'; has the contract for 'Kangaroo' and will sign if he receives a 'satisfactory answer from you about Secker and the other books'; is annoyed that [Robert] Mountsier gave the 'Kangaroo' MS to [Gilbert] Seldes of The Dial and hopes Seldes has posted it to Brown from Berlin, encloses the last page which was missing; advises Brown to write business direct to him or [Thomas] Seltzer and not to Mountsier who is travelling.

Has sent a 'couple of poems' to Austin Harrison of the English Review; asks that if Brown has a copy of 'Almond Blossom' 'handy' he should send it to Thomas Seltzer who will send a complete MS of 'Birds, Beasts and Flowers' which he considers his 'best book of poems'; hopes they can 'go ahead' with Secker, he would 'have no publisher rather than one who does not stand firm'; has asked The Dial to send their current issue which contains an instalment of the essay 'Indians and an Englishman'; suggests the essay 'might have been acceptable to several English periodicals'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

Adds a postscript at the beginning of the letter that 'those Hearst people' promised to publish 'The Captain's Doll' in January and 'are a nuisance'.

The letter has been stamped 'received', dated in pencil 27.2.23 and referred to 'CB' [Curtis Brown]; the text of the letter has been annotated in pencil, probably by Curtis Brown; refers to the poems sent to Austin Harrison and to having sent a copy of 'Almond Blossom' to [Thomas] Seltzer; also adds that the current issue of The Dial has not arrived.

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La Z 4/8/6 30.9.1926 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, [Paris, France] to Ada Clarke; Thursday [30 Sep. 1926]

Briefly notes that he has 'had nice days' [in Paris] and is going to Lausanne tomorrow, advises her to write to the [Villa] Mirenda [Scandicci, Italy]; signed 'D.H.L.'

The postcard is addressed to 'Mrs L.A. Clarke, Gee St., Ripley (Derby), Angleterre'; it is postmarked PARIS 30.IX.1926 and bears 2 red 40c stamps; the verso of the postcard bears a black and white photograph of the 'Magdalen church at a winter morning'.

Date: the card is undated; postmarked 30 September 1926

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La Z 4/8/7 10.7.1913 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, 28 Percy Avenue, Kingsgate, Broadstairs to Katherine Clayton; 10 Jul. 1913

Addresses her as 'Dear Mrs Clayton'; advises of their address and asks that she sends the 'type' there; wishes she would visit as they have 'the jolliest little flat in Margate'; asks if she 'got some more MS the other day'; sends regards; signed as 'D.H. Lawrence'.

The postcard is addressed on the verso to 'Mrs Clayton, 54 Birdhurst Rd, S. Croydon'; it is postmarked BROAD[STAIRS] JY.10.13 and bears a green 2 halfpenny stamp.

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La Z 4/8/8 27.11.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci (Florence) to V.H. Collins; 27 Nov. 1926

Addresses him as 'Dear V.H.'; is sending a copy of 'Glad Ghosts' [not present]; asks that they use 'the bill and the cheque' to send copies of the [Oxford University Press] catalogue and The Oxford Book of Songs with music; describes the climate [at the Villa Mirenda] as 'one vast steam'; mentions that he 'has taken to painting' and is beginning a picture for Boccaccio's 'story of the Nuns and the Gardener'; asks after his 'Byron's Letters' [Collins' Lord Byron in His Letters: Selections from his Letters and Journals, published 1927]; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'; adds a note that he wants them to keep the 'balance of the cheque' so he can order books.

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La Z 4/8/9/1 21.4.1922 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Kandy, [Ceylon] to Bessie Fisher; 21 Apr. n.y. [1922]

Comments on her news, 'mostly bad ... everybody with flu'; describes the weather, 'hot like a prison in a dream'; they are going to West Australia and the Brewsters are hoping to sail for Marseilles [France]; adds that he 'likes Buddha much less than ever on closer acquaintance' and knows the east is not for him; signed 'D.H.L.'

The postcard is addressed to 'E. Fisher, Casa Damiano Rosso, Taormina, Sicilia, Italy'; it is postmarked KANDY 21.AP.1922 and bears a green 3c, a brown 1c and a red 6c stamp; the verso of the postcard bears a black and white photograph of a 'Village Scene, Ceylon'.

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La Z 4/8/9/2 22.8.1922 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, Tahiti to Bessie Fisher; 22 Aug. n.y. [1922]

The voyage across the Pacific was 'lovely'; Tahiti is beautiful but Papeete spoilt; advises she write to them at Taos, New Mexico, U.S.A.; 'both greet' her; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'; adds a postscript in Italian 'many greetings to Postman Salvatore'.

The postcard is addressed to 'Miss Bessie Fisher, Casa Damiano Rosso, Taormina, Sicilia, Italie', the last 3 words have been cancelled and 'Mrs Carswell, Springfield, Salop, Anghilterra' added; it is postmarked TAHITI 23.8.22 and bears no stamp; the verso of the postcard bears a black and white photograph of a Tahitian Village Scene, captioned 'Tahiti - Fei ne s'en fait pas - We should worry'.

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La Z 4/8/10 8.8.1919 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Myrtle Cottage, Pangbourne, Berks. to Douglas Goldring; Friday n.d. [8 Aug. 1919]

Addresses him as 'Dear Goldring'; asks that Goldring let him know what happens in Holland [visit to a socialist weekly journal in The Hague]; he is willing to do anything he can 'towards sanity and real clarté'; feels that the Peoples Theatre would 'go all right'; asks to be remembered to Mrs [Betty] Goldring and would like to see her act; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence gives the conjectural date of 8 August 1919.

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La Z 4/8/11/1 30.1.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Oaxaca to Alfred Decker Hawk; 30 Jan. 1925

Addresses him as 'Dear Mr Hawk'; thanks him for 'seeing to those taxes'; discusses their pending travel plans, to see Frieda's mother; feels it a 'waster of life and money' to return to Europe so soon; wonders how 'deep the snow is' and also how Miss [Dorothy] Brett will 'stand the cold'; will write to William [Hawk] and send some money for the horses; looks forward to being back [at the ranch, New Mexico] and 'out of the world' and does not see why they cannot 'stay on till Christmas'; it would be nice to have [Mr] and Mrs Hawk as neighbours so he 'needn't feel the father in Lobo'; has had a letter from Bobbie [Gillette] in Capri who seems to be enjoying herself; sends greeting from Frieda and himself; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'; adds a note to remember him to Scott Murray.

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La Z 4/8/11/2 7.10.1925 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Garland's Hotel, Suffolk Street, Pall Mall to Alfred Decker Hawk and Lucy Hawk; 7 Oct. 1925

Addresses them as 'Dear Mr and Mrs Hawk'; describes his 'native land' as 'not very cheering'; discusses unemployment and the unwillingness of people to 'do a weeks work' as this would mean they 'go off the list of the dole'; London is more expensive than New York 'and the spending is enormous'; they are going to the Midlands to stay with his sisters [Ada Clarke and Emily King], then to Germany to visit Frieda's mother and on to Italy; it a pity that they left 'the peaceful ranch' [in New Mexico] but 'one's native land has a sort of hopeless attraction'; adds that they did not get chance to see Ted and Bobbie [Gillette] in New York; sends 'warm greetings' from Frieda; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/12/1 11.7.1918 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Mountain Cottage, Middleton by Wirksworth, Derby to Nancy Henry; 11 Jul. 1918

Addresses her as 'Dear Mrs Henry'; has received the poems and the letters and has made a book of the poems [by her husband, Leigh Vaughan Henry]; he has called it 'Poems of a Prisoner' and gives information on the omissions and work he has done on the volume; has written to his agent [J.B. Pinker] about it (see La Z 4/6/40); gives his opinion on specific poems, describes 'some of the poems' as 'very beautiful' and hopes they have success with it; has 'done the first essay of the European History' ['Movements in European History']; sends greetings from Frieda; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/12/2 3.2.1919 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Middleton by Wirksworth, Derby to Nancy Henry; Monday 3 Feb. 1919

Addresses her as 'Dear Mrs Henry'; is sorry she has been 'laid up' and hopes she will 'get sound again soon'; advises that it would be 'unwise to give up your job' as 'never has it been so difficult to make money by any form of art'; her husband [Leigh Vaughan Henry] does not know 'what the world is like now'; discusses at length the 'tension of the struggle for possession of money' and urges [Leigh Vaughan Henry] to produce music 'out of the courage of his own soul' rather than 'prostitute' himself to art.

Is glad she likes the history and sends the last four chapters; thought of calling it 'Movements in European History'; supposes that it will be anonymous and will 'apply' a pseudonym if it is useful; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/13 22.1.1925 TS copy of a letter from D.H. Lawrence, Avenida Pino Suarez 43, Oaxaca (Oax.), Mexico to Carlo Linati; 22 Jan. 1925

Addresses him as 'Dear Carlo Linati'; the Corriere della Sera with Linati's article on Lawrence 'wandered in today'; describes the article as 'a breathless series of explosions' and he was not aware that he [Lawrence] was so 'frenetico'; has been busy in Mexico 'doing a novel' which he calls 'Quetzalcoatl'; discusses at length their differing views on books and art; asks if Linati really thinks that 'books should be sort of toys, nicely built up of observations and sensations'; he cannot bear 'art that you can walk round and admire'; uses the theatre as a metaphor and hates the 'actor and audience business'; those who read Lawrence's work 'will be in the thick of the scrimmage' and if they do not like that then they should read writers such as 'Synge, Anatole France, Sophocles' who 'will never kick the footlights even'; thanks him for the article and 'all the interest you took in my works'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/14 28.7.1913 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, c/o Edward Garnett, The Cearne, nr Edenbridge, Kent to the Editor, New Statesman; 28 Jul. 1913

Addressed as 'Dear Sir' to 'The Editor of the New Statesman, 1- Great Queen St, Kingsway, WC'; offers the enclosed sketch ['The Fly in the Ointment', not present]; hopes that their 'generosity may wax to printing an occasional sketch' particularly since the success of 'Sons and Lovers' and the New Statesman having been 'kindly disposed to it'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

A reprographic copy of this item was formerly held in the collection, with the reference number La Pc 6/4.

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La Z 4/8/15/1 3.9.1915 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, 1 Byron Villas - Vale of Health, Hampstead NW [London] to Esmé Percy; 3 Sep. 1915

Addresses him as 'Dear Percy'; advises him to 'never mind about Manchester' and to 'do the play ['The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd'] in Glasgow and Edinboro'; he [Lawrence] may be able to help as he has 'connections with newspapers' and knows people; asks that Miss [Kirsteen] Graeme come see them when she is in town; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/15/2 19.12.1926 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Mirenda, Scandicci (Florence) to Esmé Percy; 19 Dec. 1926

Addresses him as 'Dear Mr Percy'; has received reviews of his [Percy's] production of The Widowing of Mrs Holroyd [produced 12, 13, 19 Dec 1926 at the Kingsway Theatre, London] and wishes he could have been there; it is a 'bore that the audience and the critics didn't like it' as they seemed 'to have done the thing so well'; accepts that 'plainly' it was his fault but suggests that the audiences and critics believe themselves perfect when they may be 'inefficient' listeners.

Confesses that it is years since he read the play and he wrote it when he was 'raw'; they may be right in suggesting that 'the last act is too much taken up with washing the dead, instead of getting on a bit with life'; asks that Percy and Miss [Marda] Vanne tell him what they think and he will 're-model the end' if the play is to be 'done again'; sends thanks to Percy, Miss Vanne, Colin Keith-Johnston and 'the others who did what they could'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'; adds some criticism of the play from a friend of Lawrence's [Rolf Gardiner].

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La Z 4/8/16 30.1.1930 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Beau Soleil, Bandol, Var, France to Dr Andrew Morland; 1 Jan. 1930

Addresses him as 'Dear Morland'; does not want to go to Ad Astra; reports on his health, 'the bronchitis has subsided a lot'; he does no work and sees nobody; they are very grateful for his sound advice and would like to give him a signed first edition of 'Lady Chatterley'; asks where to send it and will report progress again next week; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/17/1 21.7.1919 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Chapel Farm Cottage, Hermitage, nr Newbury, Berks. to Thomas Moult; 21 Jul. 1919

Addresses him as 'Dear Mr Moult'; gives details of when he will be 'in town' [London] and provides a contact address; asks when and where they should meet; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/17/2 25.7.1919 Postcard from D.H. Lawrence, 5 Acacia Rd, St Johns Wood, [London] to Thomas Moult; n.d. [25 Jul. 1919]

Addresses him as 'Dear Mr Moult'; London has 'knocked' him up; asks if he [Moult] and Mrs Moult would 'care to come to tea'; gives directions and a telephone contact number; adds that he should like to see [Louis] Golding; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

The postcard is addressed to 'Thomas Moult Esq, 66 Charing Cross Rd, WC'; it bears a red one penny stamp and is postmarked 'ST JOHNS WOOD NW.8' 8.15PM 25 Jul 19.

Date: the card is undated but is postmarked 25 Jul 19.

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La Z 4/8/17/3 9.8.1919 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Myrtle Cottage, Pangbourne, Berks. to Thomas Moult; 9 Aug. 1919

Addresses him as 'Dear Moult'; thanks him for Voices; reminds that he [Lawrence] promised 'some prose' but has to get it from the Hermitage cottage and there are other occupants at present; has written 'about a cottage'; adds 'how nice it would be if one were pleasantly far off'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/17/4 29.8.1919 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, c/o Miss Lambert, Grimsbury Farm, Long Lame, nr Newbury, [Berks.] to Thomas Moult; 29 Aug. 1919

Addresses him as 'Dear Moult'; has asked [John Middleton] Murry for the MS but he has 'lost them'; sends a preface written for an 'American publisher' [preface for Huebsch's New Poems, not present] and he [Moult] can print it if he would like; adds that he only finished 'the enclosed' [not present] yesterday; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/17/5 4.9.1919 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Grimsbury Farm, Long Lame, nr Newbury, [Berks.] to Thomas Moult; Thursday [4] Sep. 1919

Addresses him as 'Dear Moult'; thanks him for the letter and cheque, he had forgotten he [Moult] was going to pay him; asks if he liked the essay; his wife [Frieda] is 'like an unhappy hen' but he likes 'not to have a home'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

Date: the letter is dated, Thursday 5 Sept 1919; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 3, p 389 gives the date as 4 September 1919.

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La Z 4/8/17/6 10.1.1920 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Palazzo Ferraro, Capri (Naples) to Thomas Moult; 10 Jan. 1920

Addresses him as 'Dear Moult'; has received his telegram but his letter and cheque were forwarded to Florence and have not yet arrived; gives details of his and Frieda's travels which brought them to Capri, 'seeking a warm and inexpensive place'; Compton Mackenzie is there, 'the rich young novelist, but nice'; Francis Brett Young is also there; describes the island, 'lovely enough' and they will be there for a few months; asks that he [Moult] write and tell him about Voices which he guesses 'isn't drowned even by all these hooting Owls and babbling Mercuries' [The Owl and The London Mercury, magazines which first appeared in 1919]; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

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La Z 4/8/17/7 6.5.1920 (c) Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Villa Fontana Vecchia, Taormina (Messina), Sicily to Thomas Moult; n.d. [c.6 May 1920]

Addresses him as 'Dear Moult'; has never received the cheque (see La Z 4/8/17/6); 'Terra Nuova' was published in Look We Have Come Through but there is one poem in the anthology [Some Imagist Poets] which has never appeared in England ['Erinnyes']; there are 2 poems Chatto refused for Look and he will try and find them; will do 'a little rip of an essay'; asks if he [Moult] got a copy of the play 'Touch and Go'; has finished a new novel; [Martin] Secker is going to publish 'Women in Love' and also 'The Rainbow'; adds that there should be a committee for his [Secker's] 'moral encouragement'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 3, p 513 gives the date as 6? May 1920.

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La Z 4/8/18/1 8.4.1923 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Hotel Monte Carlo, Av. Uruguay 69, Mexico City to Thomas Seltzer; Monday 5 Apr. 1923

Addresses him as 'Dear Thomas'; advises that he [Seltzer] 'best fight' [Mitchell] Kennerley and 'best fight all round'; urges him not to 'conciliate any further'; he does not want to go to England and will look for a house in Mexico; they are going to Guadalajara to 'look round'; he is sorry for Seltzer, 'caught in the toils of family and sickness and nurses and impending funerals'; they were in Cuernavaca where Zapato [Emiliano Zapata, c.1879-1919, Mexican revolutionary] 'held out so long', describes it as 'dead' but 'underneath, live peons'; feels he would like 'a little hacienda ... and a few acres of land for fruit'; perhaps [Kai] Götzsche would come and help him work it; has met 'one or two liberals' but is 'weary of liberation'.

Asks whether 'The Captain's Doll' and 'Studies in C[lassic] A[merican] Literature' are out yet; also enquires after the MS of 'BirdsBeasts' [Birds, Beasts and Flowers] and the cover designs by Knud Merrild and Götzsche; asks about contracts and payments and also whether it would be simpler if Curtis Brown's American Office handled his 'stuff'; refers again to Kennerley and suggests he 'bring an injunction to stop the sale of Sons and Lovers'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/8/18/2), addressed to Mr Thomas Seltzer, 5 West 50th Street, New York City, Estados Unidos; bears a brown 10 centavos stamp, postmarked 'DESP.CORRLOS MEXICO.D.F 9.ABR.23'.

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La Z 4/8/19 7.3.1921 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Fontana Vecchia, Taormina, Sicily to J.C. Squire; 7 Mar. 1921

Addresses him as 'Dear Squire'; has been insulted 'so many times by little people like Murry'; sends 3 poems [not present] from the 'flowers part' of 'Birds Beasts and Flowers'; Robert Mountsier, 'who is acting' for Lawrence in [America], will send a copy of a 'little story' 'Fanny and Annie'; urges that he [Squire] have 'no qualms about returning it' but asks that he say what is in his work that Squire does not 'care for'; has 'just got' the typed MS of 'Mr Noon' and is finishing a 'Diary of a trip to Sardinia'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'; adds a note that he [Squire] will probably find 'Hibiscus' too long.

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La Z 4/8/20 23.3.1929 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, c/o Aldous Huxley, 3 rue du Bac, Suresnes, Seine to Genevieve Taggard; 23 Mar. 1929

Addresses her as 'Dear Genevieve Taggard'; tells her to 'never mind the review' as 'most things go wrong in print'; hopes that his seized poems 'bit the seizers'; signed 'D.H. Lawrence'.

This letter was originally found in Genevieve Taggard's copy of Look! We Have Come Through by D.H. Lawrence.

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La Z 4/8/21 16.12.1918 Letter from D.H. Lawrence, Middleton [by Wirksworth, Derbyshire] to Selina Yorke; Monday n.d. [16 Dec. 1918]

Addresses her as 'Dear Mrs Yorke'; Miss Taylor gave him 30/- for the cottage [Higher Tregerthen] and 'was not very polite'; urges Mrs Yorke to 'leave her alone'; would like it if Mrs Yorke and Arabella [Dorothy Yorke] could come to visit them; he feels sorry for Hilda [Aldington] but does not trust her; signed 'D.H.L.'

The verso of the letter has been annotated, in an unknown hand, with 'Briget', 'we are going to be there' and the word 'jolly' written 3 times.

Date: the letter is undated; Boulton, The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol 3, p 308 gives the date as 16 December 1918.

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La Z 4/8/22/1 11.1916 Letter from Frieda Lawrence, Higher Tregerthen, Zennor, St Ives, [Cornwall] to Gordon Campbell [later 2nd Baron Glenavy of Milltown]; n.d. [c.Nov. 1916]

Addresses him as 'Dear Campbell'; she was sorry 'to be done out of the pleasure of seeing you' [in London]; asks if Beatrice [Campbell] came back suddenly 'because she was afraid you might be combed into the army'; thinks he can 'impress them' and describes the war as 'a misery'; has seen her children, Monty is 'about your size'; she is 'happier in her soul' about her relationship with them and 'they are dears'; comments that his children 'must be dears' and that Katherine [Mansfield] and [John Middleton] Murry 'loved them'; sends love and wishes she knew Beatrice better; signed 'Frieda'.

Date: the letter is undated; Frieda and D.H. Lawrence lived at Higher Tregerthen March 1916 - October 1917 and Frieda Lawrence visited her children in London in November 1916.

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La Z 4/8/22/2 1.1917-2.1917 Letter from Frieda Lawrence, [Higher Tregerthen, Zennor, Cornwall] to Gordon Campbell [later 2nd Baron Glenavy of Milltown]; n.d. [c.Jan-Feb 1917]

Addresses him as 'Dear Campbell'; he will find the novel ['Women in Love'] 'sardonic'; discusses the reaction of 'The Ott' [Ottoline Morrell] who 'was furious' and 'wrote as a vulgar cook who writes to her young man'; she [Ottoline Morrell] has asked for an opal pin which she had given Lawrence, he has refused and advised her to 'be more careful another time to whom you give your friendship'; does not believe that Campbell wants the 'white shoulders', he would 'loathe them' after a week.

Her relationship with 'the children' is improving, 'there is a connection anyhow'; she and Lawrence are 'really happy' and she is 'no longer the miserable, whining, bloody female'; thinks that his [Campbell's] 'affection for Katherine M[ansfield] is a kind of vice'; she has not heard from her [Mansfield] and 'it's over' but finds 'she can come so close'; sends her affection to Beatrice [Campbell] and asks how she puts up with him; Esther Andrews has been staying and advises he sees her; signed 'Frieda'; adds a note that she hates to think of his 'daily munitions futility'.

Date: the letter is undated; Esther Andrews stayed with the Lawrence's from c.26 December 1916 to c.13 January 1916.

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La Z 4/8/22/3 17.11.1927 Envelope from Frieda Lawrence, [Florence, Italy] addressed to Gordon Campbell [later 2nd Baron Glenavy of Milltown]; 17 Nov. 1927

The envelope is addressed to Gordon Campbell, 'Clonard', Terenure, Co Dublin; postmarked 'FIRENZE FERROVIA' 17.XI.1927; the stamp has been removed; the envelope has been annotated with 'Frieda 2 letters'; the letter which this envelope would have originally contained is not present.

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La Z 4/8/23/1 12.4.1933 (c) Letter from Frieda Lawrence, Kingsley Hotel, Hart Street, WC1 [London] to Eric Gill; n.d. [c.12 Apr. 1933]

Addresses him as 'Dear Mr Gill'; gives him Lawrence's review of Gill's book ['Art Nonsense', not present] as the last thing Lawrence wrote; feels a 'pang' in parting with it but thinks he [Gill] would like it; signed 'Frieda Lawrence'; adds a note that she would like to publish it sometime.

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 4/8/23/2), addressed to Eric Gill esq, Pigotts, North Dean, High Wycombe, Naphill 42; bears a green halfpenny and a red 1 penny stamp, postmarked London APR 12 1933 1245pm.

Date: the letter is undated; the envelope is postmarked 12 April 1933.

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La Z 5 1911-1964 (c) Correspondence of and between contemporaries of D.H. Lawrence; c.1911-1964

A collection of letters and postcards written by various correspondents, mainly with reference to D.H. Lawrence.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 5

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La Z 5/1 1918 Letters from Anne Estelle Rice to Cyril W. Beaumont; 1918

A collection of 8 autograph letters written by Anne Estelle Rice to Cyril W. Beaumont between May and July 1918.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 5/1

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La Z 5/1/1 13.5.1918 Letter from Anne Estelle Rice, c/o Mrs Martin, 'Port View', East Looe, Cornwall to Cyril W. Beaumont; 13 May 1918

Discusses her designs; suggests that the blue is better with the golden brown than the purple; she does not like the colour of the paper and suggests 'a little green in it would be better'; asks what colours he has got; signed 'Anne Rice Drey'

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La Z 5/1/2 26.5.1918 Letter from Anne Estelle Rice, c/o Mrs Taylor, Ingledene, Shutta Rd, East Looe, Cornwall to Cyril W. Beaumont; 26 May 1918

She has coloured the originals and will send them tomorrow; thinks the reproductions are too small and is eager to see them on good paper; she is 'keenly interested' in Lawrence's poems and thinks they will 'stimulate' her; if the 'Lawrence book comes off' she would like to do the designs with more weight; mentions the choice of paper colour; the quality is 'excellent' and there is 'life' in the golden brown shade.

Encloses a sample form which could be used to provide information of the size, number and type of designs required for a book; suggests Beaumont use it as a guide and add 'proper terms'; adds that she is in the thick of painting and wishes him luck for the hand press; signed 'Anne Rice Drey'.

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La Z 5/1/3 10.6.1918 Letter from Anne Estelle Rice, c/o Mrs Taylor, Ingledene, E. Looe, Cornwall to Cyril W. Beaumont; 10 Jun. 1918

She is very keen to see 'New Paths' and 'to know more about the Lawrence Book' ['Bay']; hopes his 'colossal amount of work' has not made a 'wreck' of him; signed 'Anne Rice Drey'.

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La Z 5/1/4 16.6.1918 Letter from Anne Estelle Rice, c/o Mrs Taylor, Ingledene, East Looe, Cornwall to Cyril W. Beaumont; 16 Jun. 1918

She is sending him the new scheme in colour for the last piece to 'Persephone'; does not think she has done it justice but fears it is too late; has done 'several spots' for the 'Gauguin' book and asks whether they are what he wants.

Refers to his suggestion for 'four or five wood cuts on nature' and outlines a suggestion for a book, entitled 'Spring' which would contain 'manifestations of this particular season' and some 'song in verse, or vers libre, or lyrical prose'; suggests Katherine Mansfield would 'do good stuff'; she is keen to see the Lawrence MS ['Bay']; signed 'Anne Rice Drey'

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La Z 5/1/5 2.7.1918 Letter from Anne Estelle Rice, c/o Mrs Taylor, Ingledene, East Looe, Cornwall to Cyril W. Beaumont; 2 Jul. 1918

She did not intend that all the Gauguin designs should be used; adheres to her original feeling about an undecorated Gauguin book but will not 'strongly prevail' against the use of her designs; suggests that the use of idol for the front cover and palm trees for the back will not 'interfere with the artistic production'; likes the Lawrence poems ['Bay'], 'their decorations will need some weight'; discusses ideas and colour schemes for the cover of the Nichols book; suggests that the Lawrence book would be fine in the chrome paper; signed 'Anne Rice Drey'.

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La Z 5/1/6 5.7.1918 Letter from Anne Estelle Rice, c/o Mrs Taylor, Ingledene, East Looe, Cornwall to Cyril W. Beaumont; 5 Jul. 1918

Discusses the 'N. cover design' with particular reference to the colours; thinks the chrome a good colour for the Lawrence book ['Bay']; has started the designs but 'it is difficult to find an idea'; signed 'Anne Rice Drey'.

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La Z 5/1/7 17.7.1918 Letter from Anne Estelle Rice, c/o Mrs Taylor, Ingledene, E. Looe, Cornwall to Cyril W. Beaumont; 17 Jul. 1918

Is sending him 7 large designs and 2 'spots'; several others along with the poems ['Bay'] will follow in a few days; signed 'Anne Rice Drey'.

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La Z 5/1/8 31.7.1918 Letter from Anne Estelle Rice, c/o Mrs Taylor, Ingledene, East Looe, Cornwall to Cyril W. Beaumont; 31 Jul. 1918

Discusses her designs for ['Bay']; she has sent several 'spots' and has indicated which poem they are intended to illustrate; she has tried to 'scatter' the designs so that 'one part of the book would not remain high and dry'; would like to use the bay plant for a design but does not know what it looks like; asks that Beaumont 'draw roughly its character' for her; signed 'Anne Rice Drey'.

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La Z 5/2 1915 (c) Letter from John Galsworthy, Wingstone, Manaton, Devon to James Pinker; n.d. [c.1915]

He has read 'The Rainbow' and thinks it 'aesthetically detestable'; the 'perfervid futuristic style' revolts him and the reiterations bore him to death; asks 'what real discovery?' there is in the novel and describes the 'spurious creativeness' with 'not an ounce of soul'; refers to the 'sexual aspect' and believes that Lawrence 'by dwelling on the sexual side of life so lovingly ... falsifies all the value of his work'; he [Galsworthy] would prefer a 'frankly pornographic book'; sees Lawrence as 'a man tragically obsessed to the ruin of his gifts' who will increasingly see 'less and less the wood for the trees' and will lead with him 'those who think that what glitters must be gold'; apologises and adds that the first part of 'Sons and Lovers' was 'so good'; signed 'John Galsworthy'.

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La Z 5/3 23.11.1928 Letter from William Gerhardie, 5 Paddington Street, Baker Street, London to Nancy Pearn, Curtis Brown Ltd, 6 Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, London; 23 Nov. 1928

Refers to the publication of an article [on Matthew Arnold]; has had a letter from D.H. Lawrence (see Boulton The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, vol 6, pp 616-17) suggesting that they start a 'Monthly Express', 'a sort of satirical journal'; believes it a 'pleasant idea, but, of course, impracticable'; he met Michael Arlen 'at the Arnold Bennett's' and rather liked him; comments that Arlen's wife was 'the most remarkable thing about him'; autograph signature 'William Gerhardie'.

The letter has been endorsed, in pencil in an unidentified hand 'Report re Common Sense' and 'Re article on Matthew Arnold'; the name Mrs Courtney has been ticked.

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La Z 5/4 1953-1954 Letters from Edward Nehls to Rachel Annand Taylor; 1953-1954

A collection of 3 typescript letters written by Edward Nehls to Rachel Annand Taylor between Nov 1953 and Mar 1954.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 5/4.

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La Z 5/4/1 26.11.1953 Letter from Edward Nehls, Farnham, Surrey to Rachel Annand Taylor; 26 Nov. 1953

Introduces himself and explains his purpose in writing, to 'put together a kind of composite biography' of 'fugitive biographical material' on D.H. Lawrence; refers to the essay Lawrence wrote on her and her poetry whilst at Croydon and asks whether she has ever written a memoir of D.H. Lawrence or would be willing to write 'such a memoir'.

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La Z 5/4/2 5.2.1954 Letter from Edward Nehls, London to Rachel Annand Taylor; 5 Feb. 1954

Introduces himself and explains his purpose in writing, to 'compile a kind of composite biography' of 'personal memoirs and reminiscences' of D.H. Lawrence; has read, in Richard Aldington's 'Portrait of a Genius, But...', the 'interesting memoir you have written of your meetings with Lawrence when he was a teacher at Croydon'; asks whether she will grant permission for him to reprint this in his projected book and how much she would charge for it.

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La Z 5/4/3 6.3.1954 Letter from Edward Nehls, Farnham, Surrey to Rachel Annand Taylor; 6 Mar. 1954

She may be right that 'there is nothing more to be said concerning Lawrence as a human being' but his research has led him to believe otherwise; Richard Aldington and Harry T. Moore are 'enthusiastic' about his project; he is disappointed that she does not wish to write anything more and it was not clear from her letter whether she was refusing permission to reprint the letter to Aldington; hopes she will allow him to reprint the letter.

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La Z 5/5 1924 (c) Letters from Viola Meynell to Martin Secker; 1924

Two autograph letters written by Viola Meynell to Martin Secker circa Jan 1924.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 5/5.

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La Z 5/5/1 1.1924 (c) Letter from Viola Meynell, Greatham, Pulborough, Sussex to Martin Secker; n.d. [c.Jan. 1924]

Transcribes a letter from 'Olivia' [Monica, sister of Viola Meynell] regarding the publication of 'England, My England' (published by Secker, January 1924); she is concerned that 'the children [of Madeline and Percy Lucas upon whom Lawrence's story is based] will read some day of how their father cared nothing for his two second children'; supposes that there is 'nothing practicable to be done to stop the circulation of copies now'.

Viola Meynell continues in her own words; she wrote her 'strongest protest' to Lawrence when the story first appeared and it is 'agonising' that it has been published again; asks what Secker will do and adds that she will do 'anything in the world' to 'stop this and to avenge this'; signed 'Viola'.

Date: the letter in undated but was written after the publication of 'England, My England' in January 1924.

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La Z 5/5/2 1.1924 (c) Letter from Viola Meynell, Greatham, Pulborough, Sussex to Martin Secker; n.d. [c.Jan. 1924]

She knows that Secker will do what he can but has not much hope 'of protest being any use' [against the portrayal of Monica and Percival Lucas in 'England, My England'] as she wrote to Lawrence at the time; she feels this 'terribly' but knows he is not to blame; signed 'Viola'.

Date: the letter in undated but was written after the publication of 'England, My England' in January 1924.

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La Z 5/6 1911-1916 (c) Volume containing letters from Katherine Mansfield to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell] and photographs of Katherine Mansfield; n.d. [1911, 1916]

Bound volume with a printed endorsement on the spine 'Katherine Mansfield Letters to Lady Glenavy'; there are 2 photographs pasted into the volume (on ff 3v and 24r); 3 autograph letters from Katherine Mansfield to 'Bici' [Beatrice Campbell] are pasted into the volume on ff 5-23; typescript transcriptions of the above letters, with typescript page numbers 1-13, are bound into the volume on ff 25-38.

The compiler of the volume is not known, nor is the date of compilation; the letters in the volume were written between 4 May 1916 and 15 July 1916; the photographs were taken circa 1913.

The individual items pasted into the volume are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 5/6.

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La Z 5/6/1 1913 (c) Photograph of Katherine Mansfield; n.d. [c.1913]

Shows Katherine Mansfield, three quarters; a square of paper, bearing the autograph caption 'Mansfield', has been pasted onto the lower part of the photograph.

Anthony Alpers, in The Life of Katherine Mansfield, identifies this photograph as the image sent by John Middleton Murry to Michael Sadleir in 1920, intended as a publicity image for Bliss and Other Stories; Katherine Mansfield strongly objected to the use of the photograph.

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La Z 5/6/2 4.5.1916 Letter from Katherine Mansfield, [Higher Tregerthen, Zennor, Cornwall] to 'Bici' [Beatrice Campbell, later Lady Glenavy]; Thursday n.d. [4 May 1916]

Addresses her as 'My dear Bici'; asks for the prescription for 'poor [John Middleton] Murry's remaining hair'; the situation in Ireland [the Easter Uprising, 1916] is 'horrible reading'; describes the country [Cornwall] as 'lovely' and there are 'a great many adders'; but today there is mist, wind and rain; she loves to be alone and is thinking out an 'extaordinary [sic] good story about Marseilles'; has re-read her novel and cannot believe she wrote it.

Wants to talk about the Lawrences but asks that she [Beatrice Campbell] does not tell 'Kot' [S.S. Koteliansky] or [Mark] Gertler as she does not want it to get back to Lawrence; Lawrence 'has changed very much' and she feels that he is 'completely out of control'; he 'raves, roars, beats the table, abuses everybody' and is 'swallowed up in acute insane irritation'; Frieda is used to this and has a 'passion for washing clothes'; they [the Lawrence's] are too tough for her and not her kind; she does not see sex in everything as they do but adds that she will have her revenge; sends love to G[ordon Campbell]; unsigned.

Date: the letter in undated; references to the Irish Rising of late April 1916 suggest a date of April - May 1916; Vincent O'Sullivan and Margaret Scott, ed. The Collected Letters of Katherine Mansfield, vol 1, p 262 gives the date as 4 May 1916.

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La Z 5/6/3 14.5.1916 Letter from Katherine Mansfield, [Higher Tregerthen, Zennor, Cornwall] to 'Bici' [Beatrice Campbell, later Lady Glenavy]; 'Sunday Night' n.d. [14 May 1916]

Addresses her as 'Ma tres Chere'; they [Katherine Mansfield and John Middleton Murry] have been discussing the Campbells; G[ordon Campbell] is Murry's 'only love'; discusses the situation in Ireland, 'this incredible shooting of people'; understands how it must fill her [Beatrice Campbell's] thoughts; refers to Gracie Gifford's story as 'almost an Irish On the Eve of Turgeniev'; describes [Joseph] Plunkett's picture as 'a cross between Jack Squire and Willie Yeats' and [William] Orpen's drawing of a woman's [Grace Gifford's] hand has a 'strange passionate cynicism'.

Discusses Sundays and her feelings on hearing an 'unknown piano'; believes women are more 'sensitive' to Sundays than 'the moon or their monthly period'; Sunday is 'a rare state of consciousness' and she feels an uncontrollable desire to stalk the unknown piano; describes their house, 'like a house left high and dry'; a calf has lain under their window all day, if it were smaller she could send out her soul to bring it in to the kitchen fire to 'get warm and dry'; sends 'love [to] Bici'; unsigned.

Date: the letter in undated; references to the Irish Rising of late April 1916 suggest a date of April - May 1916; Vincent O'Sullivan and Margaret Scott, ed. The Collected Letters of Katherine Mansfield, vol 1, p 264 gives the date as 14 May 1916.

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La Z 5/6/4 15.7.1916 Letter from Katherine Mansfield, [5 Garsington Manor, Garsington, Oxfordshire] to 'Bici' [Beatrice Campbell, later Lady Glenavy]; 'Saturday' n.d. [15 Jul. 1916]

Addresses her as 'Dearest Bici'; she is going to Cornwall on Monday, gives her address; she arrived at Paddington [Station] to find crowds of 'Sinn Feiners' being transferred from Wormwood Scrubs to another prison; they 'looked very happy' and she wishes she had joined them; signed 'Mansfield'.

Date: the letter in undated; Vincent O'Sullivan and Margaret Scott, ed. The Collected Letters of Katherine Mansfield, vol 1, p 271 gives the date as 15 July 1916, during a visit to Garsington Manor.

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La Z 5/6/5 1911 Photograph of Katherine Mansfield; n.d. [1911]

Shows Katherine Mansfield, three quarters; a square of paper, bearing the autograph caption 'Goodnight Mansfield', has been pasted onto the lower part of the photograph.

Date: the photograph is undated but was dated 1911 in John Middleton Murry, ed. Katherine Mansfield's letters to John Middleton Murry, 1951, p 60.

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La Z 5/7 1915-1956 Letters from John Middleton Murry to Lord and Lady Glenavy [Gordon and Beatrice Campbell]; [1915]-1956

A collection of 53 autograph letters written by John Middleton Murry to Gordon and Beatrice Campbell between mainly 15 September 1948 and 2 December 1956.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 5/7

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La Z 5/7/1 1.2.1915 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Rose Tree Cottage, The Lee, Gt Missenden to Gordon Campbell [Lord Glenavy]; 1 Feb. [1915]

Discusses, at length, his feelings for Gordon Campbell; does not know whether he will post the letter or whether he will 'manage' to say what he wants to; believes that Campbell will see it as a 'trivial kind of happening'; he [Murry] must 'screw' himself up against Campbell and go his own way but believes they will remain good friends if only because of the people they 'despise together'; comments that [D.H.] Lawrence would say 'it would only have been possible between a man and a woman' but he does not think so and feels it would have been possible for them if Campbell had been different; concludes that he [Murry] has served up too much of his 'naked soul to the world'; signed 'J.M.M.'

This letter was not sent to Gordon Campbell at the time it was written; it was sent by Murry to Gordon Campbell in a letter dated 4 September 1949 (La Z 5/7/13); reference is also made to it in letters to Beatrice Campbell Sep - Oct 1948 (see La Z 5/7/2-3).

Date: the letter was originally dated February 1; the year '1914' has been added in pencil in an unknown hand; Murry, in letters to Beatrice Campbell of Sep and Oct 1948 (La Z 5/7/2-3) and one to Gordon Campbell written Sep 1948 (La 5/7/13) suggests it was written in 1915.

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La Z 5/7/2 15.9.1948 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 15 Sep. 1948

Praises her 'frightfully nice letter'; knew nothing of what she or Gordon [Campbell, Lord Glenavy] were doing; 'Kot' [S.S. Koteliansky] is the only person from whom he could have learned about them but he [Kot] is not 'fond' of Murry and their communications are 'infrequent and austere'; has been reminded of her lately whilst revising the edition of Katherine [Mansfield]'s letters.

Gives information about his marriage to Violet le Maistre, his two children by her (Katherine and John) and her death from tuberculosis; also describes his marriage to 'the rather handsome nurse-housekeeper who looked after Violet and me' [Elizabeth Cockbayne] and their 2 children, David and Mary; now lives with Mary Gamble who is 'adorable' and they live on a 'mixed farm'; has asked his boy [John] if he knew of Paddy [Patrick Campbell]; he did and described him as an 'absolutely brilliant comic writer'; has remembered that he owes Gordon £19 and will pay him, 'but not with compound interest'; mentions a letter to Gordon Campbell which was never sent, describes it as a 'pathetic document'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/3 25.10.1948 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 25 Oct. 1948

Urges them [Beatrice and Gordon Campbell] to visit him when they come over [from Ireland] in November; gives train times from Liverpool Street [Station, London] and hopes they can come in daylight so he can show them the farm; does not know much about dry rot but if it 'compels Gordon into writing THE PLAY, what the universe loses by dry rot it will gain in rich verse'; comments on the photographs she sent and will find some to send in return; it is nice to think of seeing them as he had begun to feel that there were no 'survivors' of that 'far off existence'; he recently came across a letter to [Gordon Campbell] written in 1915 and it made him admire 'the fellow who inspired it and the fellow who wrote it'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/4 7.12.1948 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 7 Dec. 1948

Was sorry that they [Beatrice and Gordon Campbell] could not visit; wants to publish Katherine [Mansfield]'s letters with 'the minimum of cuts'; quotes a section from a letter from Katherine to him [Murry] on 19 Dec 1915 in which she describes Beatrice as 'loving and affectionate' yet 'malicious ... about you and [D.H.] Lawrence'; asks if she [Beatrice] mind if he publishes it 'as it stands'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/5 22.5.1949 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 22 May 1949

He is sorry that they [Murry and Mary Gamble] cannot visit [Beatrice and Gordon Campbell]; they can only manage one holiday per year and he has been invited to lecture in Switzerland; refers to his 4 children [Katherine, John, May and David] and to his marriage to 'the unholy terror' [Elizabeth Cockbayne]; he has 'loved and been loved by three lovely women - Katherine, Violet and Mary] but this woman is a 'terrible mystery' to him; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/6 22.9.1949 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 22 Sep. 1949

He has been invited to speak at the Trinity College Philosophical Society [Dublin] in October and asks whether he and [Mary Gamble] could stay with them [Beatrice and Gordon Campbell] for the weekend; mentions Elizabeth Schuack, 'a nice woman' who has translated some things for him [Murry]; has given Schuack an introduction to [Beatrice Campbell] as she is going to Dublin to see Sean O'Failain [b 1900, Irish writer]; hopes Beatrice finds her 'congenial'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/7 13.10.1949 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 13 Oct. 1949

Discusses arrangements for his visit to Dublin and Rockbrook House [home of Beatrice and Gordon Campbell]; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/8 1.11.1949 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lord and Lady Glenavy [Gordon and Beatrice Campbell]; 1 Nov. 1949

Comments on his recent visit [to see Gordon and Beatrice Campbell]; he is glad they liked Mary [Gamble] but did not doubt that they would; it is 'amazing and lovely' that he has a 'clear and definite picture' of them both; signed 'Murry'.

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La Z 5/7/9 15.6.1950 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 15 Jun. 1950

Asks whether they [Beatrice and Gordon Campbell] will come; comments on his life as 'humdrum' and 'more and more happy'; believes one has to be unhappy to be an intellectual and it takes all his intelligence 'to be a tolerable farmer'; has just become a grandfather, 'rather belatedly' but he started late; remarks that he and Katherine [Mansfield] 'longed for one' [a child]; has been in a play, raising money for the Village Hall; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/10 9.5.1952 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 9 May 1952

Asks if they [Gordon and Beatrice Campbell] can put him and Mary [Gamble] up in July when they come to Ireland for a holiday; [Antony] Alpers has finished his book ['Katherine Mansfield', published 1954] and Murry though it 'very good on the whole'; has written a play for performance in the village roundabout; Frieda sent him recordings of her reading Lawrence's poems, they gave him 'a queer sensation'; he is writing a book on [Jonathan] Swift; signed 'Murry'

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La Z 5/7/11 1.6.1952 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 1 Jun. 1952

Discusses arrangements for the holiday to Ireland; he is pleased that Michael [Campbell] is 'doing the back number for The Irish Times' and apologises for being unable to help him; he 'hasn't a ha'penth of influence anywhere, with anybody' but is now 'modestly independent of literature' so he does not care; mentions dreams 'backward and forwards', of his time as a grandson and of when his grandson will be a grandfather; quotes [William] Blake 'Eternity is in love with the productions of time'; signed 'Murry'

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La Z 5/7/12 19.7.1952 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 19 Jul. 1952

Discusses arrangements for his trip to Ireland; has seen Frieda [Lawrence], who was in London to 'take a last look at her' children and grandchildren; she is the 'same old Frieda' although 'a bit smaller'; comments that 'old friends are the best friends'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/13 4.9.1952 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 4 Sep. 1952

Discusses the contents of a letter which he [Murry] wrote to Campbell in 1915, which, on re-reading, he finds 'interesting and strange'; comments on his feelings at the time, 'a kind of numbness', and supposes that Campbell was right; he has always cherished his affection for Campbell and is glad to know 'something has endured'; asks that Campbell write him 'if inclined ... once in a blue moon'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/14 28.9.1952 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 28 Sep. 1952

A lengthy self-examination in which Murry compares himself with [Jonathan] Swift [1667-1945, Irish author and journalist] who had 'a couple of personal crises' similar to those of Murry and [Samuel Taylor] Coleridge [1772-1834, poet] with whom Murry shared a 'feeling of real nothingness inside'; refers to a letter written to Gordon Campbell in 1915 which he finds 'interesting and strange'; discusses at length his feelings about personal relations, his affection for Gordon Campbell and the 'romantic's world'; concludes that he sounds like Plato [428-c.348 BC, Greek philosopher], he 'began as a Platonist' but is 'not quite' ending as one; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/15 12.10.1952 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 12 Oct. 1952

A philosophical letter in which Murry discusses his personal philosophy, covering his feelings about society, his personal interpretation of faith, personal relations and the condition of love.

Refers to his relationship with Katherine [Mansfield] who he did not love but 'took refuge in' and on her death became capable of love through facing up to his own loneliness; asks whether Campbell could have been more afraid of society then he [Murry] was; the difference between them was that Campbell 'elected to fight it' whilst Murry would 'get into any hole', instinctively running to 'Mother Earth'; defines his faith as 'a belief in the possibility of another mode of consciousness'; compares his philosophy to that of Spinoza [1632-1677, Dutch Philosopher] and believes that 'until you know the amor intellectualis Dei, you are incapable of personal love'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/16 23.7.1953 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 23 Jul. 1953

Gives information on his activities, he is looking after his grandson; has read 2 books on D.H. Lawrence which sent his mind back to 'pick up the threads of the past'; mentions that he likes farming, he has finished the [Jonathan] Swift book and is producing a new edition of Katherine [Mansfield]'s journal which he does not like doing; has followed the 'proceedings concerning the hold-up in which Paddy [Patrick Campbell] and Cherry [Campbell] were involved'; comments on the 'mouldy' summer; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/17 12.8.1953 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 12 Aug. 1953

Would like to invite Michael [Campbell] for a week-end with Navin Sullivan; Sullivan is nice 'but very shy'; he [Murry] is working on a new edition of Katherine [Mansfield]'s journal; has heard from Frieda [Lawrence] who is 'still enjoying life thoroughly'; comments that an American woman friend has been to Taos and seen pottery made by Frieda and her Italian husband; saw [A.A.] Milne who seems 'very old and disenchanted'; asks if she sees anything of Arland Ussher, he is a 'very nice creature'; has heard that 'Kot' [S.S. Kotenliansky] calls Murry 'Smerdyakov' [character from Dostoevsky's 'Brothers Karamakov'] which tickled him [Murry] 'immensely'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/18 17.9.1953 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 17 Sep. 1953

Comments that D.H. Lawrence used to call him [Murry] 'wispy'; refers to [Antony] Alpers book ['Katherine Mansfield']; asks Campbell whether he was 'pulling his [Alpers] leg' with comments regarding Murry and [Katherine Mansfield]; quotes a small passage from the book which says that Campbell gave the Murrys financial help and that they were 'deliberately working on people at the time'; Murry cannot remember this financial help and asks whether Campbell did pay printers' bills for them; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/19 26.9.1953 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 26 Sep. 1953

It was as he had guessed, Campbell allowed [Antony] Alpers to 'pull his own leg' [in Antony Alpers book, 'Katherine Mansfield']; he [Murry] was very naive in the old days; half understands Campbell's comment that the pre-war years in London were 'gay, hopeful, revealing years', they were not gay for him but the 'other two adjectives ring a bell'; trying to write a new preface to his book on [D.H.] Lawrence has involved him in 'wondering a good deal about it all'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/20 14.10.1953 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Norfolk to [Lord Glenavy, Gordon Campbell]; 14 Oct. 1953

Refutes attitudes to Art and the Spirit expressed by [Campbell] in a prior letter; Murry asserts that 'the experience communicated by a work of Art is essentially a metaphysical experience'; argues with [Campbell's] feeling that anyone capable of this experience ought to be immune from human relations; the Spirit is 'bound to the vehicle of the body' and although it cannot participate in human relations, it should not be contemptuous of them; it 'pleases' Murry to believe that those who are not artists can see 'the vision' through the experience of Love; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/21 28.2.1954 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 28 Feb. 1954

Informs her that his legal wife [Elizabeth, née Cockbayne] died on February 6th and he is to marry Mary [Gamble] on March 10th; comments on his four marriages; feels sorry that his wife died lonely and 'without a single friend'; his book on [Jonathan] Swift [1667-1745] is coming out on April 5th; he has been annoyed by a book on [John] Keats [1795-1821] which is 'quite untrue'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/22 4.3.1954 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 4 Mar. 1954

Asks how he should address the Swift book to Joseph Hone; discusses Love and comments that Gordon [Campbell] always claims love means nothing to him; to Murry life does not make any sense unless 'love is a reality'; he can see how 'little capable' of love he was when younger but a 'tiny spark' of the 'real thing' saved him; does not believe that he could be fond of Gordon if love really is meaningless to him; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/23 22.6.1954 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 22 Jun. 1954

Gives his reasons for undertaking a book on [Jonathan] Swift [1667-1745, Irish author and journalist]; he has been to Oxford to see Joyce Cary who he had not seen for over 40 years; found it a 'queer experience' as they seemed 'remote' from each other; wonders why he did not feel this remoteness when meeting [Gordon Campbell] after a similar interval; mentions a story about [Antony] Alpers told him by Ben Davin, a friend of Cary's, which would be a good idea for a story by Paddy [Patrick Campbell]; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/24 11.11.1954 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 11 Nov. 1954

Discusses poetry in relation to 'ordinary people'; has no doubt that what [Jiddu] Krishnamurti [1895-1986, philosopher] means by 'choiceless awareness' is the same as [John] Keats' [1795-1821, poet] 'negative capability'; thinks [Arland] Ussher is a 'genuine philosopher'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/25 2.12.1954 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 2 Dec. 1954

Would have visited 'Kot' [S.S. Koteliansky] in London had he been forwarded her [Beatrice Campbell's] letter whilst there but would not have had a 'life-giving effect' on him; lists those present at the Blake Dinner he attended in London: Dilys Powell, Herbert Read, Geoffrey Keynes, Eric Newton, Antony Blunt, Kathleen Raine and Professors de Sola Pinto and Margoliouth; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/26 30.1.1955 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 30 Jan. 1955

Comments on the death of 'Kot' [S.S. Kotenliansky]; mentions their first meeting in 1914 at the cottage of [D.H.] Lawrence at Cholesbury and urges [Beatrice Campbell] to write down her memories of him; asks if he kept to his 'old strange locutions' and describes him as 'a monumental Rabbi'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/27 8.2.1955 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 8 Feb. 1955

Reflects on the 'world' of his old friends; refers to 'Kot' [S.S. Koteliansky], Dr Fulton, [A.A.] Milne, [John William Navin] Sullivan, Sullivan's 2 wives, James Stephens, Gilbert Cannan and 'plucky little Gwen' who is 'only a name' to him; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/28 15.2.1955 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 15 Feb. 1955

Urges her to 'go on with these memories'; mentions a letter from Navin Sullivan saying that his mother [Vere Sullivan] had killed herself; discusses this suicide, his memories of Vere Sullivan and her relationship with Katherine [Mansfield]; thought her 'a queer woman' who he felt was 'like K[atherine], dangerous somehow'; read that Maria Huxley has died and relates his last encounter with her, shortly after [D.H.] Lawrence's death, when he felt she thought him [Murry] 'a clever crook'; comments on Harry T. Moore's 'The Intelligent Heart', 'a very interesting book'; a quote in the book, from a letter from Lawrence to Gordon [Campbell], describes Murry as a 'non-original, non-creative individual'; Murry thinks it 'pretty near the truth'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/29 4.3.1955 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 4 Mar. 1955

Would like to keep what she has written and urges that she send more; Philip Tomlinson has died, he was an 'uncommonly nice fellow'; recounts a row with 'Kot' [S.S. Koteliansky] and describes Kot as 'too difficult'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/30 9.3.1955 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 9 Mar. 1955

Asks who are Sophie Jacobs and the Salomons, mentioned as friends of 'Kot's [S.S. Koteliansky]; will 'put down' his memories of 'Kot'; recalls Kot's violent feelings about Katherine [Mansfield]'s attitude to 'the Christmas Party at our house in Hampstead', supposes Kot did not want to acknowledge that she was 'very ill indeed'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/31 27.4.1955 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 27 Mar. 1955

Asks if he and Mary can visit in July; signed 'J.M.M.'; adds a postscript that a large extract from 'Kot's [S.S. Koteliansky] will be in the Times on Friday.

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La Z 5/7/32 10.5.1955 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 10 May 1955

Informs her that they [Murry and his wife Mary] will arrive later than previously indicated; asks whether one gets 'more sentimental' 'as one gets older'; adds that he lives a 'very isolated life' but was never a very 'social' person; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/33 5.7.1955 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, near Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 5 Jul. 1955

Gives details for his arrival in Ireland; has written something about 'Kot' [S.S. Koteliansky] in his journal and will bring it; believes women 'romanticised' 'Kot', Murry always thought him 'terribly unhappy' and recalls a comment make about him by Bill Dunning; describes his [Murry's] quarrel with 'Kot' over his treatment of Philip Tomlinson, Murry took Philip's side and was 'jolly glad' that he did; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/34 21.7.1955 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 21 Jul. 1955

Had a 'vary happy time' [holidaying at the Campbell's home in Ireland]; wonders whether his happiness at Rockbrook [the Campbell's home] was because the 'shadow of 'Kot' [S.S. Koteliansky] was dispersed a bit'; it is nice to be 'happy in the company of friends'; signed 'J.M.M.'; adds that he is elated that the Murrys 'squared two croquet matches with the Glenavys'.

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La Z 5/7/35 9.8.1955 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 9 Aug. 1955

It is good news about Michael [Campbell]'s novel; his [Murry's] son [John] and daughter [Katherine] are staying; they have bought a croquet set and 'cultivate the Rockbrook game vigorously'; she did not say anything 'awful' about Murry and Katherine [Mansfield] in her letter; her remark that Katherine tried to make him 'into something' 'very nearly hit the bull's eye'; discusses his relationship with Katherine, she 'used' him to 'recapture her lost innocence'; adds that she was not honest with him, particularly in not telling him she could not have children.

'Kot's' [S.S. Koteliansky] 'relation with her was quite false' and 'consisted in making her up'; describes 'Kot's' influence on her as 'pernicious' and he filled her with 'dangerous dreams of being completely cured', the inevitable failure of this resulted in her death; describes Katherine as 'lovely' and adds that it would have been impossible for he and 'Kot' to be friends without him telling 'Kot' the truth which he would have never 'taken'; signed 'Murry'

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La Z 5/7/36 15.8.1955 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 15 Aug. 1955

He did not say that Marcella 'redeemed Rockbrook' for him; she would think him 'not exactly there'; remarks that 'once you slough the adaptation off in company, even of the artist, you get the real person'; adds that the 'real' Shakespeare is 'in his works' but he cannot imagine what one would get after 'he had drunk a few pints at the Mermaid'; there ought to be an 'intermediate state' when people 'experience each other directly' and there is 'real communication'; refers to Martin [Buter] and [William] Blake's [1757-1827] 'Beulah'; signed 'Murry'

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La Z 5/7/37 2.1.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 2 Jan. 1956

Thought 'the enclosed' [not present] would interest him; he knew Vickers just before the war; he and Murry belonged to a 'sort of discussion group'; never knew what he did but he was 'clearly an extraordinary man'; wonders if [Gordon Campbell] knows more about him; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/38 26.3.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 26 Mar. 1956

Asks if they [the Campbells] could have them [the Murrys] again in July; asks when Michael [Campbell]'s book is coming out and whether Michael is 'settled in Ireland' now; has read and 'thoroughly enjoyed' Michael Machiammoir's Put Money in thy Purse; cannot find his autobiography so asks that if she has one, could he borrow it; recommends Period Piece by Gwen Raverat which is 'remarkable' and some of her drawings are 'superb in their way'; has had influenza, 'quite horrible'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/39 25.4.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 25 Apr. 1956

Thanks her for sending Michael [Campbell]'s itinerary but they 'shan't be able to coincide at all'; could not make out some names in her letter; apologises if he upset her with comments about 'Kot' [S.S. Koteliansky]; quotes a letter of Keats which comments on the way [Benjamin Robert] Haydon 'upset people'; it sometimes seems that all his [Murry's] wisdom has come from 'trying to understand Keats' but this is no excuse for his having 'said something unfair and hurting about 'Kot'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/40 13.5.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; Sunday 13 May 1956

Gives details for their [Murry and his wife] arrival in Ireland; is glad she liked his 'little book' ['Jonathan Swift']; people have been mostly 'polite' about it with the exception of Austin Clarke in The Irish Times; comments on Mary's [Murry's wife] hat; the weather has been 'marvellous for the amateur' but not so good for the farmer; Frieda [Lawrence] has been ill with 'some mysterious virus infection'; they will be better croquet players than last year as they bought a croquet set and made a new lawn; looking forward to seeing them both; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/41 19.5.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 19 May 1956

Comments that he is 'all for [Charles] Dickens' [1812-1870] and has treated himself to a 'decent edition of Dickens with all the original illustrations'; gives details of accommodation for his July holiday in Ireland; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/42 1.7.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 1 Jul. 1956

Gives details for their [Murry and his wife Mary] arrival at Rockbrook [home of the Campbell]; recounts an adventurous sea crossing in 1770 from The Memoirs of Thomas Holcroft and adds that he [Murry] prefers not to have adventures; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/43 19.7.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 19 Jul. 1956

Michael [Campbell] has sent them Peter Perry; they arrived home [from Ireland] and had 'a very happy time'; the thought of what she told him about 'Kot' [S.S. Koteliansky] made him sad; on the boat returning [from Ireland] they met a 'poor little couple' who had cut short their holiday; recalls comments made to the couple about the outgoing ship, the St Andrew; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/44 24.7.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 24 Jul. 1956

The only person in Peter Perry [by Michael Campbell] with whom he identifies is Haggie but agrees that it is a 'perilous book' if some of the other characters are recognisable; gives his view of the book, 'really good - tailing off a little towards the end'; he will not comment on the book publicly and finds it 'mysterious' that Heinemann's are 'pooh-poohing the affair', publishers are usually scared by the threat of libel action; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/45 27.7.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 27 Jul. 1956

Asks if Michael [Campbell] knows that Haggie went straight to the solicitor [re Michael Campbell's Peter Perry; adds that Mike [Michael Campbell] will see that Gordon [Campbell] 'did the only possible thing' and his career as a writer ended; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/46 1.8.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 1 Aug. 1956

Has heard from Michael [Campbell] about a 'splendid review' [of Peter Perry by Michael Campbell] in the New Statesman; he is 'utterly bewildered' by Heinemann's behaviour and is unlike publishers he has known; asks whether he [Gordon Campbell] has read The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger; describes it as 'remarkable' and urges him to read it as it may give him 'a clue to Michael'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/47 1.8.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 1 Aug. 1956

Had posted his note (La Z 5/7/46) before receiving [Gordon Campbell's] which explains the Heinemann mystery; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/48 7.8.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lord and Lady Glenavy [Gordon and Beatrice Campbell]; 7 Aug. 1956

He has told Michael [Campbell] that if he has 'blotted his copybook with Heinemann' then he [Murry] will get his second novel taken by Jonathan Cape; assures Gordon [Campbell] that [Michael] has 'no lingering grievance' against him; Murry believes [Michael] feels he has 'made a bit of a fool of himself' but there is nothing for [Beatrice and Gordon Campbell] to worry about; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/49 7.8.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lord and Lady Glenavy [Gordon and Beatrice Campbell]; 7 Aug. 1956

Comments that 'things take it out of one nowadays'; has been upset by the death of Frieda [Lawrence], was 'fonder' of her than he had realised; is not surprised that Gordon [Campbell] was on the 'verge of a nervous breakdown' over Michael [Campbell]; he [Murry] felt he should be helping but felt he was failing and is thankful for Paddy's [Patrick Campbell] intervention; feels that Heinemann let Gordon and [Beatrice Campbell] down badly; Michael [Campbell] has taken his [Murry's] daughter Mary to the theatre; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/50 4.9.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 4 Sep. 1956

Sends her a copy of his notice about the death of Frieda [Lawrence] in The Times [not present]; discusses his daughter Mary and Michael [Campbell]; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/51 12.10.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 12 Oct. 1956

Informs her that he has 'just emerged from an abominable condition of nervous exhaustion'; has no news, he has been reading [Charles] Dickens [1812-1870], [George] Gissing [1857-1903] and Gissing on Dickens; urges her to read Gissing on Dickens and also J.D. Salinger The Catcher in the Rye, 'a strangely beautiful book'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/52 25.11.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, Diss, Norfolk to Lady Glenavy [Beatrice Campbell]; 25 Nov. 1956

Gives details of his 'annual visit to London'; saw Michael [Campbell] who looked 'fit and healthy'; went to a 'bad' play by Noel Coward called Nude with Violin starring John Gielgud who he did not think a very good actor; has bought Paddy's [Patrick Campbell] book Life in Thin Skies and 'laughed uproariously', he has never heard Mary [Murry] 'laugh quite as much'; also in London he saw T.S. Eliot for the first time since 1940, 'thoroughly enjoyed the meeting', and saw a doctor who said there was nothing wrong with him apart from his 'damned old legs'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/53 2.12.1956-7.12.1956 Letter from John Middleton Murry, Thelnetham, nr Diss, Norfolk to Lord Glenavy [Gordon Campbell]; 2 and 7 Dec. 1956

Has seen Michael [Campbell] in London, he seemed 'very cheerful'; Frank O'Connor [1903-1966] sent him a book of lectures on the novel, entitled The Mirror in the Roadway; thinks it the 'best thing of the kind' since E.M. Forster's Aspects of the Novel and perhaps better; comments on people being 'het up' over the Suez affair and wonders whether [Gordon Campbell] has an opinion or whether he ignores it 'on the ground that the world is a mad house anyway'; signed 'J.M.M.'

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La Z 5/7/54 1956-2000 List of letters from John Middleton Murry to Lord and Lady Glenavy [Gordon and Beatrice Campbell]; n.d. [after 1956]

Handwritten list of 53 letters from Murry to Gordon and Beatrice Campbell; provides the a date and very brief summary of the contents of each letter.

It is not know when or by whom this list was compiled.

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La Z 5/8 1919-1964 Correspondence of and between contemporaries of D.H. Lawrence; [1919]-1964

Autograph letters from or between contemporaries of D.H. Lawrence, written between 1919 and 1931.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 5/8.

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La Z 5/8/1 10.12.1919 Letter from S.S. Koteliansky to D.H. Lawrence; Wednesday 10 Dec. n.y. [1919]

Writes with regard to D.H. Lawrence's forward to [Leo] Shestov's 'All things are possible'; recommends changes to the first 2 pages, 'as it stands it is an accusation against Russian literature'; asks whether [Lawrence] can make [Martin] Secker publish Shestov's foreword; signed 'S.K.'

Date: 'All things are possible' was published in 1920, Cheney's 'Handbook of Dates' confirms 10 December fell on a Wednesday in 1919.

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La Z 5/8/2 23.4.1931 Letter from Ada Clarke, Broadway, Ripley, Derbyshire to the Editor, the 'Everyman'; 23 Apr. 1931

Thanks him for the review of 'Son of Woman' [by John Middleton Murry] in The Everyman; criticises Murry's book as 'the outcome of hatred and envy'; talks about D.H. Lawrence's relationship with Murry and Lawrence's belief that Catherine [sic] Mansfield was exploited by Murry; describes Lawrence as someone 'capable of real happiness' and 'always ready to help in every way'; adds that the majority 'have no wish to be crucified' as Lawrence was; signed 'Ada Clarke'.

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La Z 5/8/3 10.1920 (c) Letter from Maurice Magnus, Notabile, Malta to [Martin Secker]; n.d. [c.Oct. 1920]

He is sending his new book 'Dregs' which is 'not a war book' but is concerned with the morals of the Foreign Legion; D.H. Lawrence and Norman Douglas think it 'decidedly good'; signed 'Maurice Magnus'.

Date: the letter is undated; La Z 5/8/4, a letter from Magnus to Secker dated 22 October 1920 is a response to Secker's October 8th reply to this letter; dating this letter to circa early October.

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La Z 5/8/4 22.10.1920 Letter from Maurice Magnus, Notabile, Malta to [Martin Secker]; 22 Oct. 1920

Comments on [Martin] Secker's reproach 'there are some things which cannot be published' [in his MSS 'Dregs']; believes this would only be true if there were 'vulgarity' and cites a number of foreign writers who have 'depicted life as it is', including Jean-Jacques Rousseau, [Richard] Krafft-Ebbing and Frank Wedekind; mentions the positive verdicts of D.H. Lawrence, Norman Douglas and Douglas Goldring; accepts that there are 'business reasons' for his rejection of 'Dregs'; will send the first 2 parts of his 'Russian Memoirs'; adds that he will not visit England because of the climate but hopes they will meet somewhere where the 'sun shines'; signed 'Maurice Magnus'.

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La Z 5/8/5 25.10.1964 Letter from Sir Compton Mackenzie, Les Arques, France and Edinburgh to Martin Secker; 25 Oct. 1964

Has found 'a dozen' letters from D.H. Lawrence which will 'make the Lawrentians realise how much he owed to your courage in republishing The Rainbow'; he is 'fed up' with what is written about [Lawrence] by people who are 'out of touch with him in the time in which he wrote'; he [Mackenzie] is working on 'The Stolen Soprano' and his autobiography; his eyes are getting worse; he has let Gilbert Cannan off lightly but will print a letter about him from DHL[awrence]; apologises for the 'vile handwriting'; signed [illegible]

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La Z 5/8/6 26.5.1933 Letter from Helen Corke, Kelvedon, Essex to Winifred Holtby; 26 May 1933

Looks forward to receiving comments on her 'little book' ['Lawrence and Apocalypse' by Helen Corke]; comments that [D.H.] Lawrence is 'news' at the moment and interest in his work will come later; reviewers expect her book to be 'a mouthful of entertaining reminiscence' but find 'a kind of sugar almond, more apocalypse than Lawrence'; their reviews 'refrain from expressions of opinion'; signed 'Helen Corke'.

This letter was originally found in Winifred Holtby's copy of Apocalypse by D.H. Lawrence.

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La Z 5/8/7 20.8.1935 Letter from Lady Ottoline Morrell, London to [F.V.] Wylie; 20 Aug. 1935

Sends the book [The Letters of D.H. Lawrence, not enclosed]; hopes he will find it 'interesting and illuminating about D.H.L.'; signed 'Ottoline Morrell'; adds that she has been looking through a book on India which has 'good things in it'.

This letter was originally found in a copy of Apocalypse by D.H. Lawrence, inscribed to F.V. [Wylie] by Ottoline Morrell.

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La Z 5/8/8 15.12.1909 Copy of a letter from Ford Madox Hueffer, 84 Holland Park Avenue, [London] to D.H. Lawrence, copied by D.H. Lawrence; 15 Dec. 1909

Addresses him 'Dear Mr Lawrence'; has read his novel ['The White Peacock']; does not think he could publish it in The English Review, chiefly due to its length; does not think this length would 'mitigate against its popularity with the public' and thinks it might have 'considerable success' if it is properly handled; suggests he send it to one of the most 'active' publishers.

Comments that the book 'sins against almost every canon of art' and compares it to the school of William de Morgan [1838-1917] or Lorna Doone [by R.D. Blackmore, 1825-1900]; adds that he can appreciate other schools than his own and he admires [Lawrence's] 'remarkable poetic gifts' and thinks he has the makings of a 'very considerable novelist'; urges him to promise a publisher the refusal of several future works in order to encourage them to make efforts with this first book; signed 'Ford Madox Hueffer'.

This letter was originally found with galley proofs of German prose sketches by D.H. Lawrence (La Z 2/1) which were formerly in the possession of Walter de la Mare, reader for William Heinemann from January 1912; the letter, possibly this copy of it, was sent to William Heinemann 15 December 1909 (see Boulton The Letters of D.H. Lawrence vol I, p 149).

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La Z 5/8/9 12.6.1922 Envelope addressed to C.W. Beaumont, London; [12 Jun. 1922]

An envelope addressed to Mr C.W. Beaumont, 75 Charing Cross Road, London WC2, England; bears 2 red 2 cent stamps and postmarked 'BARRIE ONT JUN 12 1922'.

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La Z 5/9 1941-1950 Letters to P. Beaumont Wadsworth regarding 'A Prelude'; 1941-1950

A collection of 4 letters written to P. Beaumont Wadsworth regarding 'A Prelude' between 6 September and 6 May 1950.

The letters were originally found in a copy of A Prelude (Merle Press, 1949), copy no. 129 of 160.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 5/9.

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La Z 5/9/1/1 6.9.1941 Letter from Jessie Wood, Woodthorpe, Nottingham to P. Beaumont Wadsworth; 6 Sep. 1941

Gives information about the short story ['A Prelude'] by D.H. Lawrence published under her name.

Included in an envelope (La Z 5/9/1/3) along with a letter from Jessie Chambers to P. Beaumont Wadsworth; the envelope bears a typescript identification of the contents.

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La Z 5/9/1/2 1915 Photograph of Jessie Chambers; 1915

Two copies of a print showing Jessie Chambers, looking to the side.

Included in an envelope (La Z 5/9/1/3) along with a letter from Jessie Chambers to P. Beaumont Wadsworth; the envelope bears a typescript identification of the contents.

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La Z 5/9/2 1949 (c) TS sheet of questions, compiled by P. Beaumont Wadsworth and answered by J.R. Wood; n.d. [1949]

A list of 4 questions with answers regarding Jessie Chambers.

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La Z 5/9/3 23.2.1949 Letter from J.R. Wood, Woodthorpe, Nottingham to P. Beaumont Wadsworth; 23 Feb. 1949

His 'dear wife' [Jessie Chambers] died 5 years ago; describes her death as a 'crushing blow' as she was a 'delightful pal'; agrees to his [Wadsworth] publishing the letter from his wife in 1941; has read the notes and they seem 'substantially correct' but cannot be of much use; signed 'J.R. Wood'

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La Z 5/9/4 2.4.1949 Letter from J.R. Wood, Woodthorpe, Nottingham to P. Beaumont Wadsworth; 2 Apr. 1949

Has a minor correction to the introduction to the Lawrence story ['A Prelude']; does not know much about Lawrence or his friends, has never seen Lawrence or [George Henry] Neville and has never read 'Sons and Lovers' as Jessie said that its account of her relationship with Lawrence was a 'travesty of the real thing'; confirms that Jessie was a 'noble figure' and they were 'supremely happy together'; signed 'J.R. Wood'

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La Z 5/9/5 4.9.1949 Letter from J.R. Wood, Woodthorpe, Nottingham to P. Beaumont Wadsworth; 4 Sep. 1949

Does not wish to talk about his late wife [Jessie Chambers] and her part in the work of D.H. Lawrence; has recently re-married and is going away for a while; signed 'J.R. Wood'.

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La Z 5/9/6/1 5.5.1950 Letter from Frieda Lawrence, Taos, New Mexico, U.S.A. to P. Beaumont Wadsworth; 5 May 1950

Thanks him for [D.H.] Lawrence's 'charming first story' ['A Prelude']; she had not seen it; when Lawrence re-wrote 'Sons and Lovers' he talked about 'Miriam' [Jessie Chambers], she meant 'a great deal' to him but Lawrence wanted more from a women than 'a delightful pal'; signed 'Frieda Lawrence'

Includes an airmail envelope (La Z 5/9/6/2) addressed to 'P Beaumont Wadsworth, 20 Kendal Street, Hyde Park, London W2, England'; bears a red 2 cent and a purple 3 cent stamp and is postmarked 'TAOS N. MEX. MAY 5 1950 12.30PM'.

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La Z 5/10 1950-1951 Letters to T.S. Mercer regarding 'D.H. Lawrence's Princess' by Helen Corke; 1950-1951

A collection of 4 letters written to T.S. Mercer of the Merle Press regarding 'D.H. Lawrence's Princess' by Helen Corke between 2 August and July 1951.

The letters were originally found in a copy of D.H. Lawrence's Princess (Merle Press, 1941), copy no. 133 of 200.

The individual items are given their own description under sub-references of La Z 5/10.

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La Z 5/10/1 2.8.1950 Letter from Helen Corke, Kelvedon, Essex to T.S. Mercer; 2 Aug. 1950

Thanks him for the payment for copies of N[eutral] G[round, by Helen Corke]; refers to the Prelude introduction and comments on the marriage of J[essie] C[hambers]; encloses a photograph of [Jessie Chambers], taken in 1915 but has no unpublished photographs of D.H. Lawrence; gives details of her availability and suggests they meet at the National Book League, 15 August; autograph signature 'Helen Corke'

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La Z 5/10/2/1 30.5.1951 Letter from Frieda Lawrence, Taos, New Mexico, U.S.A. to T.S. Mercer; 20 May 1951

Describes Helen Corke's book ['D.H. Lawrence's Princess'] as 'moving and beautiful'; discusses Jessie Chambers and her relationship with [D.H.] Lawrence; believes Lawrence 'really cared for her so much more than she for him' and she 'wanted to put him in her pocket even more than his mother'; recalls a comment by Lawrence about Jane Eyre [heroine of 'Jane Eyre' by Charlotte Bronte] that she would not love Rochester until he was in her power; detests Jessie when she says that Lawrence was her 'Sodom and Gomorra' but is glad that at the end of her life she 'remembered the joy that had been between them'; remarks on how happy a letter from 'the brother' [J.D. Chambers] made Lawrence; describes a 'history book for Irish schools' as one of her Lawrence treasures; never received the book sent by Beaumont Wadsworth; signed 'Frieda Lawrence'

Includes an air mail envelope (La Z 5/9/2/2), addressed to Merle Mercer, 15 Speer Street, Thames Ditton, Surrey, England; bears a green 15 cent stamp, postmarked 'TAOS MEX. MAY 31 1951 12.30 PM'.

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La Z 5/10/3/1 1.7.1951 Letter from J.R. Wood, Woodthorpe, Nottingham to T.S. Mercer; 1 Jul. 1951

Asks that he be sent a gift copy of Helen Corke's memoir of his late wife [Jessie Chambers]; signed 'J.R. Wood'

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 5/10/3/2), addressed to T.S. Mercer, The Merle Press, 15 Speer Road, Thames Ditton, Surrey; bears a blue 2.5 d stamp, postmarked 'NOTTINGHAM 1 JLY 1951 7.45 PM'.

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La Z 5/10/4/1 18.7.1951 (c) Letter from J.D. Chambers, Beeston, Nottingham to T.S. Mercer; [c.18 Jul. 1951]

He is writing in response to Helen Corke's memoir of Jessie Chambers ['D.H. Lawrence's Princess']; describes the book as 'very sincere and sensitive' and can 'vouch for the accuracy' of its details; he is keen to give a fuller picture of his sister, she knew 'great happiness in her later life'; comments on her relationship with J.R. Wood who was a 'broken man' on her death; does not think anything he has said is of importance but wanted to give his 'authentication' to Helen Corke's work; hopes that [Mercer] will convey his feelings to Helen Corke; signed 'J.D. Chambers'.

Includes a plain envelope (La Z 5/10/4/2), addressed to T.S. Mercer, 15 Speer Rd, Thames Ditton, Surrey; bears a red 2.5 d stamp, postmarked 'NOTTINGHAM 18 JLY 1951 7.45 PM'.

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