Faculty of Engineering
  
 

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Alvaro Mata

Chair in Biomedical Engineering & Biomaterials, Faculty of Science

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Biography

Alvaro Mata is Professor in Biomedical Engineering and Biomaterials in the School of Pharmacy and the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering at the University of Nottingham. He holds a Bachelor's Degree from the University of Kansas, a Master's Degree from the University of Strathclyde, and a Doctor of Engineering Degree from Cleveland State University working with Prof. Shuvo Roy at the Cleveland Clinic. He conducted his postdoctoral training with Prof. Samuel Stupp at Northwestern University.

His group works at the interface of supramolecular chemistry, structural biology, biofabrication, and engineering to develop bioinspired approaches to design and fabricate innovative materials and devices for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. For example, by utilizing biological processes such as protein disorder-to-order transitions, compartmentalization, or diffusion-reaction processes as predictive steps of biofabrication methods, it is possible to grow functional structures that exhibit structural and functional properties of biological systems.

His work has led to seven patents or patent applications; publications in journals including Nature Chemistry, Nature Communications, Science Advances, and Advanced Functional Materials; and awards such as a Ramon y Cajal Fellowship and an ERC Staring Grant. More information can be found at: www.matabioengineering.com/, https://twitter.com/mata_lab.

Research Summary

Our group integrates supramolecular chemistry, structural biology, biofabrication, and engineering to develop new ways to build with biomolecules. Our aim is to create functional materials, devices,… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Our group integrates supramolecular chemistry, structural biology, biofabrication, and engineering to develop new ways to build with biomolecules. Our aim is to create functional materials, devices, and fabrication processes that tackle and overcome major challenges in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. We use biological phenomena such as protein order-disorder synergies, molecular self-assembly, compartmentalization, and diffusion-reaction processes in combination with techniques such as bioprinting and microfabrication. These methodologies are being used for the regeneration of a variety of soft and hard tissues as well as the engineering of more effective in vitro models. Our aim is to transform sophisticated molecular design into engineering functionality with societal impact and, in this effort, our work expands from answering fundamental questions to developing translatable technologies.

Future Research

His group works at the interface of supramolecular chemistry, structural biology, biofabrication, and engineering to develop bioinspired approaches to design and fabricate innovative materials and devices for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. For example, by utilizing biological processes such as protein disorder-to-order transitions, compartmentalization, or diffusion-reaction processes as predictive steps of biofabrication methods, it is possible to grow functional structures that exhibit structural and functional properties of biological system

Faculty of Engineering

The University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD



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