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Joanne Cormac

Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow - Music, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

Joanne Cormac is a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow and during the academic year 2017-18 she is also a Visiting Scholar at Wolfson College, University of Oxford. During the 2018 autumn semester she will take up a Visiting Researcher position at Georgetown University, Washington DC. She studied Music at the University of Nottingham (BA) and at the University of Birmingham (MMus and PhD). From 2013-15 she was a Lecturer in Music at Oxford Brookes University.

Expertise Summary

Joanne's research interests include 19th-century music and culture, with particular interests in the symphony after Beethoven, the music of Franz Liszt (especially the symphonic poems), biography, historiography, and reception issues.

Teaching Summary

Joanne's teaching interests include, romanticism, programme music, the symphony, opera, popular theatre, and biography. During the academic year 2017-18 she taught the module 19th-Century Composer… read more

Selected Publications

Joanne's teaching interests include, romanticism, programme music, the symphony, opera, popular theatre, and biography. During the academic year 2017-18 she taught the module 19th-Century Composer Biographies.

Past Research

Joanne Cormac's first monograph, Liszt and the Symphonic Poem (Cambridge University Press, 2017), offered a long-overdue examination of Liszt's vastly influential, but misunderstood and much-maligned, genre. Using contextual, philosophical, and musical evidence, Joanne tackled the thorny question: what is a symphonic poem? She overturned the traditional view that positions the symphonic poems as alternatives to the symphony post-Beethoven. In contrast, Joanne returned these influential pieces to their original performance context in the theatre, arguing that the symphonic poem is as much a dramatic as a symphonic genre.

Reviews

'… a richly detailed interdisciplinary study that provides context for the symphonic poems' evolution, as well as a synthesis of Liszt's multifarious activities between February 1848 and August 1861 … The trenchant scholarship of Liszt and the Symphonic Poem is leavened with 77 music examples, reproductions of playbills and 11 helpful tables that detail, among other things, the evolution of individual symphonic poems as well as formal analyses.'

Patrick Rucker Source: Gramophone Magazine

Department of Music

The University of Nottingham
Lakeside Arts Centre
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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