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Qi Ai

PhD in Film and Television Studies, Faculty of Arts, Faculty of Arts

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Research Summary

Current Status

PhD (full-time) - currently registered

Research Summary

My project focuses on Feng Xiaogang's New Year Celebration Films to investigate the progress of Chinese commercial cinema from 1990s to 2000s. The project aims to explore the negotiation of Chinese film industry, regulatory authority and popular culture in the progress of Chinese commercial cinema, with a question about how these three factors engage in the production of Feng's New Year Celebration Films. It regards Feng's films as the outcome of such negotiation, i.e. as politically sanctioned and commercial successful works, which represent urban daily life with humorous expression. In order to answer the research question, the project accordingly analyses the meta-commentaries about the commercialisation of Chinese film industry, the creative application to taboo subject matters, and the humorous expression (tiaokan, means banter) about daily life experience and social phenomena in the chosen cases of Feng's New Year Celebration Films.

Research Interests

My research interests include the contemporary Chinese commercial cinema, film industries and regulation, Sino-international collaboration, popular genre and youth culture, film comedy and humour in popular culture.

Research Supervisors

Dr. Mark Gallagher and Dr. Hongwei Bao

Additional Information

I have received a master degree from Keele University with a dissertation about the application of Asian images and cultural elements in Hollywood cinema. It focuses on two genres: the sci-fi Hollywood films that used Asian elements to construct narrative and atmosphere like Blade Runner (1982), and the martial art films that used Chinese cultural elements to construct stories about China like Kung Fu Panda (2008). With investigating the progress of using the Asian elements in the films, the paper regards the use as a kind of pastiche and argues the Asian elements no longer limit to decorate the films but play an active role to construct film scenarios, building a kind of imaginary China.

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