Modern Languages with Business BA

   
   
  

Fact file - 2017 entry

UCAS code:R9N1
Qualification:BA Hons
Type and duration:4 year UG (year 3 out)
Qualification name:Modern Languages with Business
UCAS code
UCAS code
R9N1
Qualification
Modern Languages with Business | BA Hons
Duration
4 years full-time/year 3 out (available part-time)
A level offer
ABB 
Required subjects
GCSE maths, B or above. one of French, German, Portuguese, Russian or Spanish if you wish to study two languages.
IB score
32 (5 at Higher Level or 6 at Standard Level (B programme) in your post-IB language(s) 
Course location
University Park Campus
Course places
25
 

This course may still be open to international applicants for 2016 entry. Please visit our international pages for details of courses and application procedures from now until the end of August.

Overview

This course enables you to combine the study of two European languages with a range of non-linguistic modules and business modules.
Read full overview

This course enables you to combine the study of one or two European languages to final degree level with a range of non-linguistic modules and business modules.

If you wish to study one language, choose from: French (post-A level); German (beginners or post-A level); Russian (beginners or post-A level).

If you wish to study two languages, choose from French, German, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish (post-A level or beginners’ level); or  Serbian/Croatian, or Slovene (beginners’ level). At least one of your two languages must be one of our post-A level languages (French, German, Portuguese, Russian or Spanish), as you may only include one beginners’ language in your programme.

Your modules will include core modules in business and in languages, along with optional modules relating to the history, culture, politics, literature, film or linguistics of the countries where the languages you are studying are spoken.

By the end of your course you will have a sound understanding of fundamental business principles and theories. You will have acquired a high level of competence in the language or languages you have studied and a broad knowledge of the culture of the countries where they are spoken. Your international experience will recommend you to employers.  

Year one 

You begin two structured language courses in the languages of your choice. You are also introduced to the modern history and culture of the countries where your two languages are spoken. A third of your studies will be in entrepreneurship, economics and organisational studies.

Year two

As well as continuing to develop your language skills, you choose topics from a wide range of options in the fields of literature, history, society and culture of the countries where your two languages are spoken. A third of your studies will be in marketing and organisational studies.

Year three

You will divide your time between countries where your chosen language(s) are spoken. Depending on where your placement is, you could study at one of our exchange universities, teach on the British Council assistantship programme, or undertake a work placement with a company. 

For more information see our Year Abroad page.

Year four

As well as continuing to develop your language skills, you choose special topics from a wide range of options in the fields of literature, history, society, and culture of the countries where your two languages are spoken. You will also study human resource management and another business discipline of your choice.

More information 

See also the Nottingham University Business School.
 

Entry requirements

A levels: ABB including B in one of French, German, Portuguese, Russian or Spanish if you want to study two languages. GCSE maths, grade B or above

English language requirements 

IELTS 7.0 (no less than 6.0 in any element)

Students who require extra support to meet the English language requirements for their academic course can attend a presessional course at the Centre for English Language Education (CELE) to prepare for their future studies. Students who pass at the required level can progress directly to their academic programme without needing to retake IELTS. Please visit the CELE webpages for more information.

Alternative qualifications 

We recognise that potential students have a wealth of different experiences and follow a variety of pathways into higher education, so we treat applicants with alternative qualifications (besides A-levels and the International Baccalaureate) as individuals, and accept students with a range of less conventional qualifications including:

  • Access to HE Diploma
  • Advanced Diploma
  • BTEC HND/HNC
  • BTEC Extended Diploma

This list is not exhaustive, and we consider applicants with other qualifications on an individual basis. The entry requirements for alternative qualifications can be quite specific; for example you may need to take certain modules and achieve a specified grade in those modules. Please contact us to discuss the transferability of your qualification.

For more information, please see the alternative qualifications page.

 

Flexible admissions policy

In recognition of our applicants’ varied experience and educational pathways, The University of Nottingham employs a flexible admissions policy. We may make some applicants an offer lower than advertised, depending on their personal and educational circumstances. Please see the University’s admissions policies and procedures for more information.

 

Notes for applicants 

Applicants with GCSE or AS level language should contact the School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies for details.

 
 

Modules

This is a combined honours course, meaning it has three components. All three components have equal weighting in the degree. 

This course enables you to combine the study of two European languages to final degree level with a range of non-linguistic and business studies modules. 

Languages offered as part of this course are: French (post-A level only); Portuguese, German, Russian, Spanish (all beginners or post-A level); and Slovene, Serbian/Croatian (beginners only). 

You will choose a language combination from the list above and follow core language modules appropriately alongside modules from the Business School, on our Jubilee campus.



Typical Year One Modules

Business School Modules

Entrepreneurship and Business

This module presents a formal analysis of entrepreneurship in theory and practice leading on to a consideration of creativity and business concept generation. You’ll have 11 two-hour lectures with the module concluding with the practical application of these theories and concepts in a business planning and business concept presentation.

 
Studying Organisations

This module charts the development of the social sciences and their relationship to the natural sciences. You’ll begin with a brief history of social science followed by examples of research and then move on to focus on methodological issues including quantitative and qualitative research. You’ll finally consider the move away from positivism towards qualitative interpretive research processes by looking at the work of ethnographers in organizations. You’ll have 20 one-hour lectures and 1 two-hour tutorial.

 
New Venture Creation

New Venture Creation will engage you in the more practical elements of innovation and enterprise activity, in terms of creating new businesses and entrepreneurship within the corporate environment. You’ll become prepared for enterprise activity across a variety of contexts. You’ll have 11 two-hour seminars, 7 hours lecture-based learning and 4 hours of mentored group work/practical enterprise activity.

 
People and Organisations

This module introduces you to the basic ideas of organisational behaviour and allows you to develop an understanding of how individuals behave as members of groups and organisations. You’ll have 9 two-hour lectures, 1 one-hour lecture a one two-hour computer lab-based simulation tutorial and a one-hour tutorial session.

 
 

Language Departments

Students on this degree course will typically take core modules in the first year of study and select from a range of optional modules in the second and final year of the course. Beginners normally follow a set programme in their beginners’ language in the first two years of the course. For more details of optional modules in your particular language combination, please see the relevant web page for individual language departments. 

Introduction to French and Francophone Studies
You will receive a firm grounding in the structures of French through the core language module. You will also follow a core module 'Introduction to French and Francophone Studies' which will prepare you for studying the range of topics and skills you will develop in your degree course. You will also choose optional modules in French literature and the history and politics of contemporary France.
 
Introduction to German Studies: Unity and Diversity in German Identities
This core 20-credit module introduces you to some of the key areas of German Studies that you can go on to study in German over the course of your degree: linguistics, literature, translation studies, film, history, politics and society, and cultural studies. You will choose to specialize in some of these areas in your degree; for others, this module provides you with a basic foundation which will be useful to you as a student of German Studies. The module also helps you learn and practise the key skills that you will need in your degree and beyond: not just taking exams, but also researching, reading and taking notes, writing essays, and making oral presentations: the same skills that you will take with you into your future careers. It also helps you gain experience in reading and listening to a wide range of German language - informal and formal, literary and academic, for example, so that you develop your ability to use German in your studies and in your career.
 
Nation, Myth, Identity: Introduction to Russian and Slavonic Studies
This module introduces students to important areas and topics in Russian and Slavonic Studies, examining important aspects of the histories and cultures of the region, as well as aspects of the languages, cultures and literary traditions. You will learn to analyse a wide range of cultural phenomena, including pictures, music, film, literary texts and other kinds of written sources.
 
History of the Low Countries
This module will introduce students to selected topics in the history of the Low Countries from the sixteenth century to the present day. It will focus on a number of key events and periods such as the fall of Antwerp in 1585, the Belgian Revolution of 1830, the Flemish Movement and the Second World War. You’ll spend two hours per week in lectures and seminars studying for this module.
 
Introduction to Literature in Spanish
You’ll read a series of key texts from Spain and Spanish America. Its purpose is to impart an essential body of literary-historical and cultural knowledge relating to the main periods, genres and conventions of literature in Spanish from the Middle Ages to the modern period. You’ll spend two hours per week in lectures and seminars studying for this module.
 
Introduction to Lusophone Societies and Cultures
The Portuguese speaking-world is made up of people on four different continents: Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas, and there are eight countries in which Portuguese remains the official language. The spread of the language is a representation of the reach of the Portuguese Empire at its height as well as a reflection of the legacy of Lusophone cultures. This module provides you with the opportunity to learn about the diversity of cultural practices and social relations in the different parts of the world where Portuguese is spoken. The module covers the major social and cultural practices from modern Lusophone societies, including aspects of popular culture such as football and soap operas, but also cultural and artistic currents in literature and film. Questions of social relations and identity are also examined through a consideration of religious practice and religious expression, as well as themes of conflict, crisis and revolution through formations of political identity and political mobilisation. For this module you will have a one 2-hour lecture each week.
 
Culture and Society in the Low Countries
This module will examine the development of the Netherlands and Belgium since the First World War with particular reference to: the period from 1945 to the present day; society in the Netherlands and Belgium; aspects of Dutch and Flemish culture. 
 
Spain and Portugal in the Twentieth Century
In this module you’ll study the evolution of Spanish and Portuguese history, politics and culture from 1898 to the present day. You’ll be encouraged to draw links between the Portuguese and Spanish experiences, and place both countries’ experience of the twentieth century within the broader context of European and wider global history in this period. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the development of both countries from a (perceived) position of ‘difference’ and ‘backwardness’ to relatively prosperous, economically developed and culturally diverse members of the European Union. You’ll spend around 4 hours in lectures each week.
 
Politics and Literature in Contemporary 'Hispanic' Literature
This module aims to develop your knowledge and understanding of the interfaces between literature and politics through the study of the way in which crucial social and political issues are articulated in contemporary Spanish cultural artefacts. You’ll have a weekly two-hour seminar to cover material in this module.
 
 

 

 

Typical Year Two Modules


Business School Modules

Marketing Strategy

This module focuses on the strategic dimension of marketing with reference to the ways in which organisations compete with different product-market offers. There is an emphasis on the processes involved in the development of a marketing strategy and the ways in which such strategies evolve. You’ll have 11 ninety-minute lectures and 2 one-hour seminars.

 
Designing and Managing Organisations

Introducing you to the characteristics of organisations and organisations as systems, you are provided with concepts, theories and illustrations which will help you become effective managers in a rapidly changing world. You’ll have 11 ninety-minute lectures plus 2 sixty-minute tutorials to study for this module.

 
Managing the Marketing Mix

This module introduces the operational aspects of marketing through analysis of the design and implementation of the marketing mix. You’ll have 11 ninety-minute lectures and 2 sixty-minute seminars per semester to study for this module.

 
Technology and Organization

This module will examine a number of technologies, including cloud computing, 3D printing, nanotechnology, genetic modification, synthetic biology, artificial intelligence, robotics, genetic medicine and bioprinting, in the context of wider sustainability issues. You will also explore the broader themes of convergence, technological determinism, transhumanism and the Singularity. You’ll have 11 ninety-minute lectures plus 2 sixty-minute seminars, one ten-minute video and seven podcasts.

 
 

Language Departments

French and Francophone Studies

choose from a list of optional modules including:

Francophone Africa: Exploring Contemporary Issues through Culture

This module explores a range of political and social issues relevant to contemporary sub-Saharan Francophone Africa through literature, film and popular culture. It also offers an overview of the history of the French language in Africa and introduces students to the range of varieties of French spoken there today. You’ll have an hour each of seminars and lectures weekly for this course.

 
Difference and Equality in Post-War French Thought

This module explores the socio-cultural politics of equality through the study of three key texts by prominent French and Francophone thinkers. It considers the equality and inequality of class, gender and race through close readings of the texts within the wider context of twentieth-century French and Francophone history and culture as well as in relation to major philosophical and theoretical ideas and traditions such as semiotics, linguistics, Marxism, postcolonialism, existentialism, feminism and psychoanalysis. You’ll have an hour long seminar weekly plus a workshop to aid your understanding of the module content.

 
Approaches to Post-1990 Fiction

This module offers an introduction to the study of very recent literature through the detailed analysis of three texts dealing with issues arising from late 20th and early 21st century society. Themes considered include immigration, the position of women, reality television and responses to terrorism. You’ll have an hour of lectures and an hour of seminar weekly during this module.

 
More Options
 


German Studies

choose from a list of optional modules including:

New German Cinema

Between the mid 1960s and the mid 1980s West German cinema rose to new national and international success due to the work of a number of young directors who were commonly perceived as representatives of a "New" or "Young" German cinema. This module will analyse selected films from this period. You will be introduced to the individual styles of different directors (Fassbinder, Herzog, Wenders) as well as to their common thematic preoccupations. The analysis will aim to situate the "New German Cinema" within the contexts both of the development of the film industry and of contemporary social and political developments in West Germany. You will have one 2-hour seminar and one 1-hour workshop per week in addition to four hours of private study.

 
Reason and its Rivals from Kant to Freud

This module discusses a selection of theoretical approaches to modernity. You will start by studying Immanuel Kant’s assertion of individual reason as the founding stone of enlightened social organisation. You will then explore interrogations of that position in the work of Marx and Engels, Nietzsche and Freud. You will have one 2-hour seminar per week in addition to four hours of private study. 

 
From Runes to ROFL: Language Change in the Germanic Languages
This module will introduce students to the history of the Germanic languages, from the earliest linguistic evidence up to the present day. We will investigate the major sound changes that distinguish Dutch, German and other Germanic languages like English from the rest of the Indo-European language family (which includes French, Greek, and many other European languages, as well as Sanskrit). You'll look at the process by which Dutch and German went their separate ways , ultimately emerging as two standardised languages in the 17th century. You'll spend two hours per week in lectures and seminars.
 
More Options
 


Russian and Slavonic Studies

choose from a list of optional modules including:

The World of Orthodox Sainthood

You’ll gain an understanding of the growth and development of the cult of saints in the Eastern Christian world in the context of the history and culture of late antiquity and the middle ages. In particular, you’ll learn to interpret original written sources and icons and will master the basic tools for conducting research in the field, spending around three hours in lectures and seminars each week. 

 
Screening Russia: Film and Society from the Tsars to Putin

You’ll be given an in-depth understanding of developments in late-Soviet and post-Soviet society and culture as reflected in key films from the period 1959 to 2010. You’ll examine how films from this period are constructed technically and develop skills in analysing films in their historical and social contexts. You’ll spend around two hours per week in lectures and seminars.

 
Serbian and Croatian Literature: 20th Century

You’ll examine major literary movements in Serbia and Croatia during the 20th century, from Modernism to the socially engaged literature of the 1930s, Socialist Realism, literary politics under the Communists in Yugoslavia and the emergence of critical literature in the 1980s and 1990s. You’ll also undertake a textual analysis of representative works from 20th century literature; for example, works by Milos Crnjanski, Ivo Andrić, Miroslav Krleža, Danilo Kiš and Slobodan Selenić. You’ll spend around two hours per week studying in lectures and seminars.

 
More Options
 


Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies

choose from a list of optional modules including:

Discoveries, Empire and Colonies in the Lusophone World

This module brings together the histories and cultures of key regions of the world in which Portugal establishes varying degrees of colonial rule between the 16th and 20th centuries. In this module you will examine the historical background to the age of Discoveries against which Portugal emerged as a leader in maritime exploration and European Imperialism. You will also examine the historical and political events of Portuguese colonialism and imperialism in Africa and Brazil, with an emphasis on understanding the political and social significance of cultural production in developing countries. In this module you will have a combination of lectures and seminars totalling 2 hours per week.

 
Nation Building and National Identities in the Lusophone World

In this module you will be introduced to some of the major texts of the Portuguese-speaking world. You will examine the ways in which ideas of nationhood and national identity have been expressed and constructed through cultures of the Lusophone world. You will study the ways in which cultural production is embedded in the formation of nationhood and ideas about national identity and therefore culture are examined through its political and historical context. For this module you will have a 2-hour lecture each week.

 
More Options
 
 


Year Three 

You will divide your time between countries where your chosen language(s) are spoken. Depending on where your placement is, you could study at one of our exchange universities, teach on the British Council assistantship programme, or undertake a work placement with a company. 

For more information see our Year Abroad page.

Typical Year Four Modules


Business School Modules

Human Resource Management I

This module introduces the basic concepts of Human Resource Management (HRM) in broader perspective and subjects them to critical analysis. Areas covered will include: HRM models, recruitment and selection, appraisal and pay, training, job design, work-life balance and HRM and performance. You’ll study through 11 ninety-minute lectures plus 2 one-hour tutorials.

 
Human Resource Management II

This module examines a number of advanced topics in the area of Human Resource Management (HRM). It builds on ‘Human Resource Management I’. The topics covered include ethical issues in HRM, employment regulation, equality and diversity, and voice and participation. You’ll have 11 one-hour lectures and 2 two-hour tutorials to study for this module.

 
Strategic Management I

This module examines the different approaches and techniques of strategic management including analysis of the external and internal environments, the nature of competitive advantage and the development of the firm. You’ll have 11 ninety-minute lectures and 2 sixty-minute seminars to study for this module.

 
Strategic Management II
This module examines the managerial and organisational factors that influence the formation and subsequent realisation of strategy. The course enables you to develop skills in the analysis of strategic processes, with particular reference to the role of leadership, change, learning, and power strategy. You’ll have 11 ninety-minute lectures and 2 sixty-minute seminars to study for this module.
 
 

Language Departments


French and Francophone Studies

choose from a list of optional modules including:

Citizenship, Ethnicity and National Identity in Post-War France

This year-long module will examine the range of social, political and philosophical questions raised by mass immigration to France in the post-war period. These questions will be tackled through historical analysis of patterns of migration and changing immigration policies, as well as through the study of relevant films, novels and theoretical texts which engage with questions of citizenship, identity and ethnicity. You’ll have an hour long lecture and an hour-long seminar weekly for this module.

 
Language and Social Interaction

This year-long module introduces students to the close and detailed study of spoken language as a fundamental resource for human action and social organisation. The normative structures of the mainstream conversation-analytic tradition will be explored. Examination of both ordinary conversation and institutional discourse will enable us to explore the ways in which actions are performed, identities constructed and context achieved through talk. Students will be expected, and encouraged, to analyse data and discuss their observations. You’ll have two hours of lectures weekly for this module.

 
People and Propaganda

The module is designed to introduce students to the study of various forms of artistic works in relation to the political and social background of the French Revolutionary decade (1789 - 1799). Consideration of this period will follow a set English-language based history. The course will then consider various case studies of a variety of works (theatre, opera, song, iconography, painting) taken from key moments in the period, studying the reflection of contemporary events in such works, the notion of politically "engaged" arts, and the questions of cultural administration. You’ll attend a lecture and a seminar every week for this module.

 
More Options
 


German Studies
 

choose from a list of optional modules including:

Culture and Society in the Weimar Republic

The Weimar Republic (1919-1933) was one of the most fascinating and culturally productive periods of German history, but it was equally ridden by crises and violent conflicts. This module aims to introduce central issues in the literary and social developments of Weimar Germany. You will study a wide range of materials (literary texts, film, aesthetic and political programmes) to analyse key features of the period. Topics will include the impact of the Great War, developments in the press and the cinema, political confrontations, cabaret, and unemployment. You will have one 2-hour and one 1-hour seminar per week in addition to four hours of private study.

 
Recent Women's Writing

In this module you will explore a number of novels and stories written since 1960 by German-speaking women writers. You will also study selected texts on the cultural, political and social contexts of the rise of the second wave feminism in the 1970’s, the changing position of women in the FRG, GDR and Austria, and the increasing awareness of ethnic pluralities. You will compare texts and contexts and explore a variety of reading strategies developed in feminist criticism. For this module you will have one 2-hour and one 1-hour seminar each week in addition to four hours of private study.

 
The Morphology of German

In this module you will be introduced to morphology (the study of the structure of words) of German and the study of linguistics. Beginning with a general introduction to morphology, you will look at the form of morphology controlled by syntax before moving on to other aspects. You will also consider the differences between native German morphological processes and those borrowed from other languages. Major developments in the German morphological system will be traced from the Middle ages to the present day amongst other topics in relation to the Morphology of German. For this module you will have one 2-hour and one 1-hour seminar each week in addition to four hours of private study.

 
More Options
 

Russian and Slavonic Studies
 

choose from a list of optional modules including:

Serbian/Croatian for Linguists

This module is a fast-track course of study for students in their final year who wish to acquire a new language. The module is based on the textbook Teach Yourself Serbian and will introduce you to everyday use of the language. Through three hours of practical classes each week, you’ll study different points of grammar (syntax and morphology) as well as vocabulary for everyday situations.

 
Russian Popular Music in the 20th and 21st Centuries

The module offers an in-depth study of the development of popular music in Russia in the 20th and 21st centuries. You will gain knowledge of the popular musical culture of the late Tsarist, Soviet and post-Soviet eras, and learn to analyse songs and performances using such concepts as authorship, performance, technology and ideology. You will have one lecture and one two-hour seminar per week on this module.

 
Russian Interpreting

Introducing you to Russian-English interpreting, topics covered include evaluating interpreting, differences between English and Russian and problems of interpreting arising from these, reference sources, equivalence at and above word level and strategies for dealing with non-equivalence, collocation and idiom, cultural factors, and language variety. You’ll spend around two hours per week in practical classes and lectures.

 
More Options
 

Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies

choose from a list of optional modules including:

Lusophone Identities, Culture, and Modernity in Portugal and Africa

In this module you will focus on identities and identity formation, as represented or articulated in literary, cinematic and visual texts, as the basis of a chronological survey of the development of Lusophone societies and culture in the 20th century. You will focus on two particular areas: the political ramifications of contending conceptions of race, gender, and sexuality in the last century and the role of cultural indentity and ‘identity’ politics’ in nation-building and in the negotiation of, and recovery from, collective crises such as regime change and civil conflict. For this module you will have a 2-hour seminar each week.

 
Comparative Modern Literature in the Romance Languages

In this module you will be introduced to the major currents in the 20th Century in the context of finisecular and early 20th century European and American literature and culture in order to situate the latter common preoccupations and formal experiments of writers of poetry and short fiction of various nationalities, languages and cultures. This module consists of two case studies split between the Autumn semester where you will focus on the comparative analysis of works by poets such as Rubén Darío and Mallarmé, Apollinaire and Alberti, and Fernando Pessoa among others. In the Spring semester you will you focus on the parallel developments in the evolution of the short story across a similar range of languages and cultures and include an analysis of short fictions from authors such as Jorge Luis Borges, João Guimarães Rosa, Carlos Fuentes among others. For this module you will have a 2-hour seminar each week.

 
More Options
 
 

The modules we offer are inspired by the research interests of our staff and as a result may change for reasons of, for example, research developments or legislation changes. The above list is a sample of typical modules we offer, not a definitive list.

 
 

Year abroad

You will divide your time between countries where your chosen language(s) are spoken. Depending on where your placement is, you could study at one of our exchange universities, teach on the British Council assistantship programme, or undertake a work placement with a company. 

For more information see our Year Abroad page.

 

Careers

You will have a sound understanding of fundamental business principles and theories. You will have acquired a high level of competence in two languages and a broad knowledge of the cultures of the countries where they are spoken. Your international experience will recommend you to employers.

Average starting salary 

Availability for employment and salary data for this school is not attainable due to a small sample size. Please contact the school for guidance:

e: clas-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk

Careers Support and Advice

Studying for a degree at The University of Nottingham will provide you with the type of skills and experiences that will prove invaluable in any career, whichever direction you decide to take. Throughout your time with us, our Careers and Employability Service can work with you to improve your employability skills even further; assisting with job or course applications, searching for appropriate work experience placements and hosting events to bring you closer to a wide range of prospective employers.

Have a look at our Careers page for an overview of all the employability support and opportunities that we provide to current students.  

 
 

Fees and funding

Scholarships and bursaries

The University of Nottingham offers a wide range of bursaries and scholarships. These funds can provide you with an additional source of non-repayable financial help. For up to date information regarding tuition fees, visit our fees and finance pages.

Home students*

Over one third of our UK students receive our means-tested core bursary, worth up to £2,000 a year. Full details can be found on our financial support pages.

* A 'home' student is one who meets certain UK residence criteria. These are the same criteria as apply to eligibility for home funding from Student Finance.

Scholarships and bursaries

The University of Nottingham offers a wide range of bursaries and scholarships. These funds can provide you with an additional source of non-repayable financial help.

Home students*

There are several types of bursary and scholarship on offer. Download our funding guide or visit our financial support pages to find out more about tuition fees, loans, budgeting and sources of funding.

To be eligible to apply for most of these funds you must be liable for the £9,000 tuition fee and not be in receipt of a bursary from outside the University.

* A 'home' student is one who meets certain UK residence criteria. These are the same criteria as apply to eligibility for home funding from Student Finance.

International/EU students

The University of Nottingham provides information and advice on financing your degree and managing your finances as an international student. The International Office offers a range of High Achiever Prizes for students from selected schools and colleges to help with the cost of tuition fees.  
 
 

Key Information Sets (KIS)

Key Information Sets (KIS)

KIS is an initiative that the government has introduced to allow you to compare different courses and universities.

Assessment

This course contains a period of study abroad. Students spend one semester in each country and assessment depends on the language(s) studied and may be one or more of the following:

  • French: students' language skills and cultural understanding are assessed through both presentations and written assignments upon their return to Nottingham.
  • German: students' language skills and cultural understanding are assessed through a presentation. The assessment forms part of the final year language module R23201 or R23202 (essay and oral, 10 credits) and makes up 20% of the overall module mark.
  • Spanish/Portuguese: assessment is a grammar and translation exercise, completed in class under exam conditions during week one, and a written report on a topic related to the year abroad. This is submitted in week two. 

The report should be 500 words, word processed and about a relevant cultural, social, political or religious topic associated with the country where the year was spent. The average of both pieces makes up 10% of the final mark.

  • Russian and Slavonic studies: students are assessed on their language skills and cultural understanding developed during their year abroad.

Assessment of the Russian part of the degree is through a presentation and forms part of the final year core language module R83112 (Advanced Russian). This makes up 10% of the final mark. 

Assessment of the year abroad for Serbian and Croatian studies is incorporated into the assessment of coursework for R83098 (Serbian/Croatian 3), which is the final year core language module.  

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Disclaimer
This online prospectus has been drafted in advance of the academic year to which it applies. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate at the time of publishing, but changes (for example to course content) are likely to occur given the interval between publishing and commencement of the course. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply for the course where there has been an interval between you reading this website and applying.

Contact

Admissions Administrator. School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies 
 

Student Recruitment Enquiries Centre

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