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David Gehring

Assistant Professor in Early Modern British History, Faculty of Arts

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Biography

Born and raised in America's Dairyland (Wisconsin), I received my BSc in History and Economics before earning the MA and PhD from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. I've been a research fellow at higher education institutions like Warwick, Durham, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, as well as elite archives such as the Huntington Library, Newberry Library, Folger Shakespeare Library, and the Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenbüttel. By way of teaching, before coming to Nottingham in September 2014, I taught in Wisconsin (at Madison and elsewhere) and California (just east of Los Angeles).

Expertise Summary

My general area of research is in early modern British history, but with reference to the wider European context. More particularly, most of my focus is dedicated to Elizabethan England's relations with the Protestant territories of the Holy Roman Empire and Denmark. Commercial and other economic connections are of interest, but of greater significance in my research are the wars of religion, religious diplomacy, and international intellectual networks.

Students interested in any aspect of early modern British or European history are encouraged to contact me, though I would be especially excited to supervise students interested in international relations, religious and intellectual history, or Elizabethan England. To date (December 2015) I have supervised and examined postgraduate projects (MA and PhD) on religious and political exiles, religious and political minorities, Anglo-Russian relations, and travel literature.

Teaching Summary

Having only recently come to Nottingham, my teaching in academic year 2015-16 will be fairly limited. I shall occasionally contribute lectures to the Reformation to Revolution module, but I'll be… read more

Research Summary

My most recent research project has been an edition of three manuscript treatises of intelligence on the Holy Roman Empire and Denmark during the reigns of Elizabeth I of England and James VI of… read more

Recent Publications

  • GEHRING, DAVID, ed., 2016. Diplomatic Intelligence on the Holy Roman Empire and Denmark during the Reigns of Elizabeth I and James VI: Three Treatises Cambridge University Press, for the Royal Historical Society.
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2016. Review of Amy Nelson Burnett, Kathleen M. Comerford, and Karin Maag (eds.), Politics, Gender, and Belief: The Long-term Impact of the Reformation. Essays in Memory of Robert M. Kingdon (Geneva: Librairie Droz, 2014) The Journal of Ecclesiastical History. 67(2), 425-6
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2016. Review of Gerlinde Huber-Rebenich (ed.), Jacques Bongars (1554-1612): Gelehrter und Diplomat im Zeitalter des Konfessionalismus (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2015) The Journal of Ecclesiastical History. 67(4), 898-9
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2015. Foedus et Fractio: Queen Elizabeth, the Formula of Concord, and the Protestant Cause. In: OSTEN-SACKEN, VERA, BARONIN VON DER, ed., Fürstinnen und Konfession: Beiträge hochadliger Frauen zur Religionspolitik und Konfessionsbildung Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht. 303-15

Having only recently come to Nottingham, my teaching in academic year 2015-16 will be fairly limited. I shall occasionally contribute lectures to the Reformation to Revolution module, but I'll be more involved as a seminar leader in Learning History and as the convenor of my special subject, 'Overseas Exploration, European Diplomacy, and the Rise of Tudor England'.

By way of postgraduate teaching, I've been involved either as a supervisor or examiner of MA dissertations on religious and political exile, early modern travel, and Catholic minorities in Elizabethan and Jacobean England, as well as PhD theses on the Lollard tradition in sixteenth-century England and Royalists during the Interregnum. Those interested in applying to postgraduate study in early modern British and European history are warmly invited to contact me.

Current Research

My most recent research project has been an edition of three manuscript treatises of intelligence on the Holy Roman Empire and Denmark during the reigns of Elizabeth I of England and James VI of Scotland. The book has been published by Cambridge University Press for the Royal Historical Society's Camden Series (details at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayIssue?iid=10066985). I've also got articles in the works on John Foxe's use of German/Lutheran materials and Elizabethan publications of German Protestant works, but more on those projects anon.

Past Research

Past research projects include my PhD thesis, which was significantly abridged and revised as my first book, Anglo-German Relations and the Protestant Cause: Elizabethan Foreign Policy and Pan-Protestantism (details at http://www.tandf.net/books/details/9781848933699/). Challenging accepted notions of Elizabethan foreign policy, the book argues that Elizabeth's relationship with the Protestant Princes of the Holy Roman Empire was more of a success than has been previously thought. Based on extensive archival research, AGR contends that the enthusiastic and continual correspondence and diplomatic engagement between the Queen and these Protestant allies demonstrated the deeply held sympathy between the English Church and State and those of Germany and Denmark. Additional, smaller projects have included an article on Elizabeth's hitherto unknown Lutheran tutor, Johannes Spithovius, chapters in edited collections, and (most recently) a historiographical review on Anglo-German relations during the Reformation.

Future Research

My next major research project is a book on Robert Beale, Queen Elizabeth's primary specialist on German affairs. This book will be the first full-scale work on Beale to be published, as only a smattering of articles have come to light (though a few excellent PhD theses on various aspects of Beale's career remain unpublished). The sources to be consulted include not only Beale's own papers in the British Library and other State Papers in London but also stray materials in Aberdeen, Chicago, and Utah.

  • GEHRING, DAVID, ed., 2016. Diplomatic Intelligence on the Holy Roman Empire and Denmark during the Reigns of Elizabeth I and James VI: Three Treatises Cambridge University Press, for the Royal Historical Society.
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2016. Review of Amy Nelson Burnett, Kathleen M. Comerford, and Karin Maag (eds.), Politics, Gender, and Belief: The Long-term Impact of the Reformation. Essays in Memory of Robert M. Kingdon (Geneva: Librairie Droz, 2014) The Journal of Ecclesiastical History. 67(2), 425-6
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2016. Review of Gerlinde Huber-Rebenich (ed.), Jacques Bongars (1554-1612): Gelehrter und Diplomat im Zeitalter des Konfessionalismus (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2015) The Journal of Ecclesiastical History. 67(4), 898-9
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2015. Foedus et Fractio: Queen Elizabeth, the Formula of Concord, and the Protestant Cause. In: OSTEN-SACKEN, VERA, BARONIN VON DER, ed., Fürstinnen und Konfession: Beiträge hochadliger Frauen zur Religionspolitik und Konfessionsbildung Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht. 303-15
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2015. Thomas Cranmer's Lutheran Books on Romans, Ushaw XVIII.C.9.4. In: KELLY, JAMES, ed., Treasures of Ushaw College Library: Durham's Hidden Gem Scala. 72-73
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2015. Review of Daniel Riches, Protestant Cosmopolitanism and Diplomatic Culture: Brandenburg-Swedish Relations in the Seventeenth Century (Leiden: Brill, 2013) English Historical Review. CXXX(546), 1243-5
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2014. From the Strange Death to the Odd Afterlife of Lutheran England The Historical Journal. 57(3), 825-44
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2014. Ethics and Anglo-German Relations during the Wars of Religion. In: WENDEBOURG, DOROTHEA and RYRIE, ALEC, eds., Sister Reformations II: Reformation and Ethics in Germany and in England / Schwesterreformationen II: Reformation und Ethik in Deutschland und in Englan Mohr Siebeck. 299-323
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2014. Spithovius [Spithoff], Johannes (d. 1563), royal tutor and diplomat. In: Oxford Dictionary of National Biography September Update. Oxford University Press.
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2014. Elizabeth’s Correspondence with the Protestant Princes of the Empire, 1558-1586. In: BAJETTA, CARLO M., COATALEN, GUILLAUME and GIBSON, JONATHAN, eds., Elizabeth I’s Foreign Correspondence: Letters, Rhetoric, and Politics Palgrave Macmillan. 189-207
  • GEHRING, DAVID AND ADAMS, SIMON, 2013. Elizabeth I’s Former Tutor Reports on the Parliament of 1559: Johannes Spithovius to the Chancellor of Denmark, 27 February 155 The English Historical Review. 128(530), 35-54
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2013. Anglo-German Relations and the Protestant Cause: Elizabethan Foreign Policy and Pan-Protestantism Pickering and Chatto.
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2009. Reformation and English Foreign Policy Studies: The Future Looks Bright The Sixteenth Century Journal. 40(1), 249-51
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2006. Review of Verschuur, Mary, Politics or Religion? The Reformation in Perth 1540-1570 (Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press, 2006 Reformation & Renaissance Review. 8(2), 247-8
  • GEHRING, DAVID, 2005. Review of Christ-von Wedel, Christine, Erasmus von Rotterdam: Anwalt eines neuzeitlichen Christentums (Münster, 2003) The Sixteenth Century Journal. 36(3), 907-8

Department of History

University of Nottingham
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Nottingham, NG7 2RD

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