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People in Mental Health and Clinical Neuroscience

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Muzna Shehzad

Research Assistant, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

Muzna is a Research Assistant at the UoN Hearing Sciences Scottish Section as part of the Mental Health and Clinical Neuroscience Division based at the Royal Infirmary in Glasgow. She is currently part of the HS-PrediCt team under the supervision of Dr. Lauren Hadley, previously having worked with Dr. Graham Naylor.

Muzna's study background is in Psychology and Mental health with her postgraduate being from the University of Nottingham UK where she was awarded the International Postgraduate Excellence Award.

Her current research work focuses on using eye-tracking and neuroscientific techniques (EEG, TMS) to investigate prediction time course during conversation. Muzna is also actively involved in the lab's Patient and Public Involvement and Public Engagement initiatives.

HS-PrediCt: https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/research/groups/hs-predict/people/people-at-hs-predict.aspx

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/muzna-s-202/

Research Summary

- Currently, her main project is an eye-tracking study investigating prediction time course during conversation. Her focus is to explore the potential impact of hearing impairment on prediction and… read more

Current Research

- Currently, her main project is an eye-tracking study investigating prediction time course during conversation. Her focus is to explore the potential impact of hearing impairment on prediction and how it can be better supported.

- Her external work with Durham University focuses on a qualitative study on equality, diversity, and inclusion in innovative practices.

Past Research

- In her previous RA position with Dr. Naylor, she worked on a project to develop a method to estimate hearing loss remotely that may provide a reliable replacement/addition to an in-person audiogram.

- During her postgraduate, she investigated the potential biomarkers for anxiety disorders through electroencephalograph (EEG). This included exploring alpha reactivity for generalized anxiety disorder, heartbeat-evoked potential during interoceptive and exteroceptive attention tasks for anxiety sensitivity, and N170, N2, and P1 event-related potential components for social anxiety.

- During her previous RA position at UoN Business School, she worked on a British Academy-funded research project examining the forms of crisis communication carried out by businesses during the first two Covid-19 lockdowns in 2020 using a multimodal social semiotic framework.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

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