Centre for Additive Manufacturing
PhD students

PhD Students

PhD students from a variety of backgrounds are carrying out doctoral research in the context of the EPSRC Centre and at the Centre for Additive Manufacturing.

 

Ageel Abdulaziz Alogla

Ageel Abdulaziz Alogla 

PhD title: The impact of adopting AM on responsive supply chain performance.

Supervisors:  Prof Christopher Tuck and Dr Martin Baumers

Research summary
Ageel Alogla is a PhD student working on understanding the effect of using additive manufacturing (AM) technology in specific market environment. He is particularly interested in examining the impact of adopting AM on a responsive supply chain performance, where demand is characterized by uncertainty. He is also working on developing a model that could quantify different flexibility measurements for an AM supply chain. Moreover, he is studying the role AM plays in reducing the risk of failure of New Product Introduction (NPI).
 
 
 

Mansoor Alruqi

Mansoor Alruqi

PhD title: Investigating aeroengine design and assembly processes towards achieving Zero Defects using Integrated Failure Mode and Effects Analysis

Supervisors:  Dr Martin Baumers and  Dr David Branson

Research summary
This project aims to determine a working architecture of transmitting/managing the cascaded failure modes within aeroengine design and assembly processes; synchronizing the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) procedures (i.e. Function FMEA with Design FMEA (DFMEA) and Process FMEA (PFMEA)) procedures. This architecture will provide a means of tracing requirements from the top-level through all system levels and enable bi-directional risk flow up/down the product structure to support the goal of zero-defect manufacturing. Also, this project aims to establish a quantitative correlation between FMEA execution and design reworks to investigate FMEA execution impact.
 
 
 
Jonathan Austin

Jonathan Austin

PhD title: Additive manufacturing of photon sensors based on hybrid low dimensional 0D/2D heterostructure

Supervisors: Dr Lyudmila TuryanskaProf Richard HagueProf Chris Tuck and Dr Oleg Makarovskiy

Research summary

My Research involves the development of optoelectronic devices containing 0D perovskite nanocrystals and 2D materials (graphene) with the use of inkjet-printing. 

My research focusses on the development and studies of 0D and 2D inks for additive manufacturing of photosensitive devices. The overall aim of my project is to develop up-scalable production of photon sensors with extended detection range.

 
 
 
Samuel Connor

Samuel Connor

PhD Title: Biomechanics and Biomimicry of Marine Mussel Plaque Substratum Interaction 

Supervisors: Dr Tao Liu, Dr Yong Pang, Dr Ian Maskery, Professor Ian Ashcroft

Research summary
I'm investigating the mechanics of how mussels and other organisms adhere in wet and hostile environments, then seeing how we can mimic those mechanics for use in engineering applications
 
 
 
Shreeja Basak 2

Shreeja Basak

PhD Title: Effect of Process Stability and Scalability on Cost of Polymer Powder Bed Fusion Processes.

Supervisors: Dr Martin Baumers, Prof Chris Tuck and Prof Richard Hague

Research summary
This project investigates how build setup and process planning affect the process productivity and cost of producing parts in polymer powder bed fusion (PBF) processes. Particular attention is given to sources of production losses, such as the risk of failed prints and idle time during prints. Additionally, the research will explore the network effects of multiple-PBF-machine setups, and how these influence the productivity and cost. This research will extend our understanding of effective AM operations alongside the true cost of parts produced using AM, helping manufacturers to improve the economically feasibility of AM for wider industry applications.
 
 
 
Diego Della Crociata

Diego Della Crociata

PhD Title: Creating new energy-absorbing structures for automotive using additive manufacturing of lightweight steels

Supervisors: Dr Ian Maskery, Dr Marco Simonelli and Prof Richard Hague

Research summary
My research focus is on the design of lattice structures able to absorb energy when undergoing dynamic loads, in particular crashes in automotive industry. This is done by using an internal software which allows to create so-called TPMS (Triply Periodic Minimal Surfaces) structures. The aim is to prove that those structures perform better than other kinds of structures in terms of energy absorption.There is a concurrent focus on the material that is adopted to print the structures, as it must satisfy the requirements of energy absorption without causing damage to the rest of the environment and by keeping the weight low. Therefore, lightweight steels are considered, and the inherited mechanical properties are investigated. A consequence is that one of the main issues coming from the use of additive manufacturing, porosity, must be addressed. 
 
 
 
Cameron Devine

Cameron Devine

PhD title: A theranostic agent for cardiac disease

Supervisors: Prof. Derek Irvine, Dr. Tracy Farr and Dr. Peter Harvey

Research summary
I completed my master’s in chemistry at the University of Hull. My final year project was focused on the coupling of two metal species to beta-lactam antibiotics (methicillin etc.).  
I hope to synthesize a diagnostic nanoparticle with therapeutic capabilities.
 
 
 

Giuseppe Del Guercio 2019 v2

Giuseppe Del Guercio 

PhD title: Super-Alloy by Additive Manufacturing: New Alloy Compositions for Selective Laser Melting

Supervisors: Dr Marco Simonelli,and Prof Christopher Tuck 

Research summary

My research aims to develop a new series of titanium and aluminium alloys for use in SLM in which the alloy composition will be designed to improve the strength and productivity according to the requirements imposed by the aerospace and automotive industry, respectively. The research will be carried out using the empirical and computation approaches for predicting phase formation in materials under the conditions posed by the SLM process. Experimentation will combine elements of powder feedstock formulation, operation of the latest laser powder-bed platforms and analysis and characterization of the printed structures using state-of-the-art microscopy and testing techniques. 

 
 
 

Negar Gilani 2019

Negar Gilani

PhD title: Mastering metal deposition through metal-jetting technique by numerical simulations and experiments

Supervisors:  Prof Richard Hague,  Prof Ian Ashcroft, Dr Nesma Aboulkhair and Dr Marco Simonelli

Research summary
The PhD project contributes to the EPSRC funded Programme Grant looking into Next Generation Additive Manufacturing. The main objective is to understand the 3D deposition of single and multi-material high-temperature metallic through computational modelling; and to validate this work through practical experimentation. This novel metal-jetting technique is exclusively available at the CfAM through a collaboration with Canon-Océ. The printing process works by laying down each voxel of a desired digital object in form of liquid metal droplets. The droplets are dispensed one at a time, deposited in rows and layers onto a solid base until the entire part is created. 
 
 
 
Jan-Hendrik Groth

Jan-Hendrik Groth

PhD title: New design and evaluation strategies for rapid implementation of 3D printing technologies in gas turbines

Supervisors: Prof Adam Clare and Prof Chris Tuck 

Research summary
My research will focus on new designs for heat transfer applications. The new designs will be manufactured by additive manufacturing and their performance evaluated by experiments. These new designs will be used for case studies in gas turbines. 
 
 
 
Bethany Husband

Bethany Husband

PhD title: Inkjet printing of non-solvent polyimide replacement materials

Supervisors: Prof Derek IrvineProf Chris Tuck and Prof Richard Hague

Research summary
There is an increasing demand for high performance and durable materials in additive manufacturing, particularly in the microelectronics industry. Polyimides offer attractive chemical and mechanical properties to fulfil this need, however, several barriers still exist to utilising these materials in 3D printing techniques. My project focusses on the formulation of novel polyimides that can be inkjet printed directly, without the need for using organic solvents in the printing and processing stages.
 
 
 

Andrea Konta

Andrea Alice Konta

PhD title: Design of new materials for two-photon polymerisation

Supervisors: Prof Derek IrvineProf Ricky WildmanProf Cameron Alexander and   Dr Laura Ruiz Cantu

Research summary
Two photon polymerisation is a 3D printing technique that manufactures structures with sub-micron feature sizes. However, the lack materials availability prevents the technique to reach its full potential. As a consequence, this research project focuses on developing new materials for two photon polymerisation and for a better understanding of its process. Different biodegradable polymers are being synthesized and tested, with a particular view to select those that are amenable for use as an exemplar biomedical device for ocular therapy.
 
 
 

Athina Liaskoni

Athina Liaskoni 

PhD title: 3D Printed Polymeric Implants for Personalised Drug Therapy

Supervisors:  Prof Clive Roberts and  Prof Ricky Wildman

Research summary
Conventional drug delivery systems, tablets, capsules, and solutions, can be limited for the treatment of some diseases. Their necessary frequent administration can be unpleasant to patients and their compliance can be reduced. Sustained release implants can offer a solution and 3D printing a novel method of manufacture of such devices. With 3D printing, it is possible to fabricate drug loaded polymeric implants in order to achieve personalised controlled drug release. In this approach, patients could replace a number of different medications with one drug delivery system which could contain the exact dosages and release profiles of the active ingredients they need. In my project, I will explore the use of the polymer polycaprolactone for the manufacturing of implants, with extrusion-based 3D printers. This 3D printing method is quite similar to conventional hot-melt extrusion pharmaceutical processing technologies and precise dosing and complex drug release profiles can potentially be achieved.
 
 
 
Juan Reyes Luna

Juan Francisco Reyes Luna

PhD title: Neptune – Inkjet printing digital object generation and compensation for surface chemistry effects

Supervisors:   Prof Chris Tuck and Prof Ian Ashcroft

Research summary
As AM technologies advance and printed electronics materials improve in their electrical and mechanical properties there is a requirement to print onto non-porous substrates. These substrates may vary in surface material, be non-planar in topography, or may generally require tight features that push inkjet resolution to its limits. The project is targeted to leverage new modelling techniques to provide an "inverse design" digital object correction to compensate for the fluid dynamics of drops on non-porous structures. It is also expected to account for the topography of the printed structure and be able to model the effect of multiple layers built up on each other.
 
 
 

Marica Malenica 2019

Marica Malenica 

PhD title: Towards continuous production of core-shell particles for additive manufacturing

Supervisors:  Prof Derek IrvineProf Richard HagueProf Clive Roberts and Dr Yinfeng He

Research summary
Application of selective laser sintering in biomedical filed has been hampered by the lack of suitable polymeric materials. In order to overcome this hurdle, Marica is synthesising biocompatible core-shell particles.Shell of the particles is composed of sintrable material, while core is made of photocurable non-processable matrix with drug-incorporating potential.Particle synthesis is performed in coaxial jet mixer, which can be upgraded to continuously fabricate particles, in amounts of up to several kg/day.
 
 
 
Anna Mitzakoff

Anna Marie-Therese Mitzakoff

PhD Title: Using 3D Printing to fabricate self-assembling Elastin-like-Protein (ELP) Hydrogels for bone based applications

Supervisors: Prof Ricky Wildman, Prof Derek Irvine, Dr Laura Ruiz Cantu and Alvaro Mata

Research summary
3D Printing has been used in research to print scaffolds that mimic the structural environment and the mechanical strength of bone. But like with other synthetic substitutes, the disadvantages of poor mechanical strength and issues with neovascularization, degradation rate, cell attachment and undesired immune responses remain.Anna is developing an alternative ELP hydrogel membrane fabrication method that will be implemented into Additive Manufacturing (AM) to enable structural reproducibility and improve the predictability of mechanical properties. Printing personalized bone implants that exhibit mechanical properties resembling those of bone without the need of cell culturing can be a vital step forward in bone replacement therapy.
 
 
 
Oliver Nelson-Dummett

Oliver Nelson-Dummett

PhD title: 3D Printing of Electronic Materials

Supervisors: Dr Lyudmila TuryanskaProf Chris Tuck and Prof Richard Hague

Research summary
I am working on the development of electronically active materials for use in 3D inkjet printing. The inkjet process allows for multi-material printing, but the available material selection is limited. I’m hoping to add to that selection - particularly with semiconducting materials - as well as to develop improved printing methods to optimise their performance. The ultimate goal is to enable the printing of complete electronic devices such as sensors within one machine. 
 
 
 

Binsha Ollekkatt Sivadas 

Binsha Ollekkatt Sivadas

PhD title: 3D Printing with 1D Functional Nanomaterials

Supervisors:  Prof Ruth GoodridgeProf Ian Ashcroft and Prof Andrei Khlobystov 

Research summary
My research aims to revolutionise the ways in which we make functional materials by combining innovative manufacturing techniques with nanoscale materials design. To achieve this, I will have to synthesise a range of nanomaterials using carbon nanotubes and nanofibers as 1D templates to achieve desired electronic, optical or catalytic properties, by applying the methods developed in the School of Chemistry. My research also aims at integrating the functional nanomaterials into polymer composites with programmed mechanical properties, shape, and composition, by utilising powder bed fusion techniques developed for novel polymer nanocomposite powder. The presence of functional 1D nanostructures within the 3D printed material is expected to bring new effects and functional properties that can be exploited in practical applications. So the mechanical, structural and functional properties of these materials will be tested using advanced characterisation methods.
 
 
 
Daniel Padrao

Daniel Padrão

PhD title: Theromfluid Optimisation of AM high heat flux components for fusion

Supervisors: Dr Ian Maskery and Prof Chris Tuck

Research summary

This project will attempt to optimise the geometry of the divertor component (the heat exhaust system of a nuclear fusion reactor) for heat transfer using additive manufacturing. This is because the heat exhaust system of the divertor has been identified as a key issue on the road to the commercialisation of nuclear fusion power. Therefore, researching new methods of designing and manufacturing divertors must take place now to avoid delays in the commercialisation of fusion power if traditional methods aren’t able to manufacture divertors to the standard required. Additive manufacturing is a technology with significant potential application in fusion for high temperature, high heat flux components due to the complex structures (such as lattices) that this technology allows us to manufacture.

 
 
 

Robert Plant 2019

Robert Plant 

PhD title: Vat photopolymerisation on wafer printing

Supervisors:  Prof Chris TuckProf Richard Hague and Prof Ricky Wildman 

Research summary
The project is to investigate alternative additive manufacturing (AM) methods for use in the fabrication of semiconductors.  Spin coating photoactive polymers in conjunction with photolithography is used extensively in this process but is limited to thin layers and rectangular geometries.  To produce thicker layers, multiple steps are necessary.  By applying AM technologies, such as VAT polymerisation, three dimensional geometries can be built directly on to wafer surfaces to reduce the manufacturing steps and expand design features.  AM can also be applied to the back-end packaging, interconnects and in-package passives to support the development of the next generation semiconductor devices.
 
 
 

Kristian Plender

Kristian Plender  

PhD title: Novel Approaches to the Long Term Release of Biomacromolecules

Supervisors:  Prof Felicity RoseProf Clive Roberts and Prof Ricky Wildman

Research summary
The release of biopharmaceuticals is an established and growing route to the provision of treatment in a number of a chronic areas, including cardiovascular and metabolic illnesses such as diabetes. It is desirable to tailor these treatments and the delivery mechanism to the patient, and as a consequence we propose to investigate the use of additive manufacturing / 3D printing as a pathway to bespoke production. We will consider how we can use additive manufacturing to create implants and depots specifically to deliver biomacromolecules. This is challenging, since these molecules are large and often unstable, requiring the development of methodologies that facilitate controlled release whilst protecting the molecules during manufacture and prior to their elution in use.
 
 
 

Jing Pu 2019

Jing Pu

PhD title: Parametric Analysis of 3D Printing of Continuous Carbon Fibre with PEEK Matrix Using the FFF Process

Supervisors: Prof Arthur Jones and Prof Ian Ashcroft 

Research summary
My project concerns the printability of CF/PEEK with a high volume carbon fibre volume fraction. I fabricated this CF/PEEK filament with my self-developed pultrusion system since there is no commercially available continuous CF/PEEK filament for this printing process available. Subsequently, I conducted a series of tests to find the pultrusion process parameters that span the processing window. I then successfully printed my filament. Additionally, I have studied the weld formation, analysing the crystal growth in both neat PEEK and currently also CF/PEEK with the Infrared-thermography (IRT). Together with other researchers, we aim to develop a model to find the best PEEK crystalline percentage for welding to optimise the printing parameters in order to maximize the PEEK matrix fusion to carbon fibre. 
 
 
 

Nur Rofiqoh Eviana Putri 2020

Nur Rofiqoh Eviana Putri

PhD title: Additive Manufacture of Biodegradable Biocomposite based Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering Application 

Supervisors: Dr Laura Ruiz Cantu, Prof Ricky Wildman and Prof Felicity Rose

Research summary
This project will consider the technical challenges in developing effective scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration. We will use an additive manufacturing approach in order to produce scaffolds that have the required geometry for promoting cell attachment and growth, as well as facilitating vascularisation. The scaffolds will incorporate novel biocompatible composites both to encourage efficacy but also to enable the effective processing of the material via additive manufacturing routes.  Our goal will be to produce novel materials and structures that will result in significant improvement in scaffold performance.
 
 
 
Tien Quach 2019

Tien Thuy Quach

PhD title: Novel micro/nano scale characterisation of interfaces in multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing)

Supervisors: Prof Clive RobertsProf Richard Hague and Dr Gustavo Ferraz Trindade

Research summary
A primary concern with regards to enabling this next generation of AM systems is the difficulty of inter and intra layer coalescence/bonding of functional-structural or functional-functional materials due to differences in physical state, chemistry and temperature at deposition or conversion. To overcome these problems one of the requirements is the development of a suite of ex-situ interface analysis techniques capable of delivering a complete 3D characterisation of samples at the micro/nano scale with high spatial resolution. These are not limited by, but rely strongly on, techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB), (cryo) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The aim of this project is to advance the fundamental understanding of interface phenomena in multi-material additive manufacturing and this will be achieved mainly by the development of tailored methodologies related to all strands of electron microscopy.
 
 
 

Joseph Sefton

Joseph Sefton 

PhD title: Production and Use of Oligomers in Additive Mnaufatcure

Supervisors:  Prof Derek IrvineProf Ricky Wildman and Dr Cordula Hege

Research summary
One of the key issues in additive manufacturing (AM) is the limited palette of materials. The overarching goal of my project is to deliver new polymeric materials with novel mechanical properties that are compatible with existing AM processes. The target method of AM, such as inkjet printing or selective laser sintering, will depend on the physical properties of the synthesised materials.This project will involve synthesises and characterisation of various functional low molecular weight polymers (oligomers) to identify ideal candidate materials to bring forward for use in AM. This will be achieved by using catalytic chain transfer polymerisation, as this has been shown to provide excellent control over polymerisations and produce end-functionalised polymers, which are compatible with current photoinitiated curing techniques in AM.
 
 
 
Frederick Temple

Frederick Temple

PhD title: Predictive Modelling and design optimisation of erodible drugs 

Supervisors:  Prof Ricky WildmanProf Clive Roberts and Prof Ian Ashcroft

Research summary
Understanding and optimising drug release kinetics by taking into account geometric considerations, initial drug concentrations to drug solubility ratio, diffusion etc. Empirical models will be used and modified, based on experimental data derived from NMR or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy; the models will be finite element based. 
 
 
 

Arielle Torres

Arielle Torres 

PhD title: High Speed Powder Bed Process

Supervisors: Prof Christopher TuckProf Richard Hague and Dr Yinfeng He

Research summary
The vast majority of methods for polymer additive manufacturing rely on thermal methods of bonding materials together. Therefore, this project will look into a new method of production known as Reactive Powder Bed Fusion whereby new materials are subject to high speed processing at room temperature, removing many of the bottlenecks facing the process and its uptake. For this project a new machine architecture will be explored with a focus on the optimisation of parameters and deposition techniques for Polyurethane materials commonly used in a range of sectors including automotive, sports and others.
 
 
 

Xiao Yuan Laura Wang

PhD title: The Synthesis and Continuous Manufacture of Novel, High Performing Polymeric Lubricants for the Next Generation of Electric Transportation

Supervisors: Prof Derek Irvine 

Research summary
This PhD project is in collaboration with BP Castrol and will apply both chemistry and engineering to develop novel polymeric lubricants for electric transportation. Polyurea based lubricating greases have attracted much interest due to its excellent oxidative and thermal stability, good load bearing character and promising material compatibility with elastomers and paints. Specifically, this project aims to develop a series of isocyanate free polyurea polymers that have the desired properties to fit with the intended end use application and continuous manufacturing techniques to manufacture high performance polyurea lubricants. Microwave technology and reactive extrusion in particular will be considered as new manufacturing options for polyurea based lubricating grease. 
 
 
 

Julan Wu 2019

Julan Wu

PhD title: Design and optimization and manufacturing of high performance electric machines using Innovative design and optimization techniques

Supervisors: Prof Ian AshcroftProf Richard Hague, Dr Nesma Aboulkhair and Dr Thomas Cox

Research summary
This project aims to enhance the properties of SLM printed NdFeB magnet through parameter optimisation during processing and post-treatments including heat treatment and resin infiltration. The effect of energy density, laser power, scanning speed, point distance, exposure time, hatching distance, layer thickness and scan strategy to build near-net-shape NdFeB magnets for application. A better understanding of the microstructure of the NdFeB material from post-process heat treatment is beneficial to enhance the magnetic and mechanical properties. Through the investigation of the resin composition and practical infiltrating process. Resin infiltration on as-built NdFeB parts is potential to overcome the limitation of the mechanical performance due to metallurgy defects and the sensitivity of the magnetic property of the SLM processed NdFeB magnetic performance at high-temperature. 
 
 
 
Yuyang Wu 2019

Yuyang Wu

PhD title: Developing high throughput materials assessment systems for 3D printing

Supervisors: Prof Ricky Wildman and Prof Derek Irvine 

Research summary
There is an increasing need for widening the 3D materials materials portfolio. One method to achieve this is to take a high throughput approach - the mass characterisation of multiple candidate materials and formulations at the same time. This has, to some degree, been demonstrated for ink jet based printing. However, for extrusion based methods no high throughput systems have been proposed and demonstrated. This project will consider the process conditions for extrusion based 3D printing, and design and make a high throughput system capable of depositing multiple samples.
 
 
 

Ling Xin Yong 2019

Ling Xin Yong

PhD title: Development of antimicrobial polymer for biofunctional devices

Supervisors:  Prof Derek IrvineProf Ricky Wildman and Prof Simon Avery

Research summary

My research work focuses on screening large number of polymers for their antimicrobial properties with a high throughput process developed within the group. With selected polymers I develop them further such that they become suitable for wider range of applications including inkjet printing, dip coating and stereolithography printing (SLA).

 
 
 
Yassin Ziar

Yassin Ziar

PhD title: Modular Additive Manufacturing for Next Generation Hydrogen Storage (Supported by the EPSRC Sustainable Hydrogen CDT)

Supervisors:  Dr Ian Maskery and Professor Gavin Walker

Research summary
This PhD research aims to optimise the performance of on-board solid-state hydrogen storage vessels using additively manufactured metallic lattice structures. Storage in this form involves the use of metallic powders - that store hydrogen in their microstructures - to fill the vessels, however the powders are characterised by poor thermal conductivities. The rate in which hydrogen is absorbed and desorbed in these systems is thermally limited hence the University of Nottingham’s FLatt Pack software will be used to select and generate lattice structures of high surface area to volume ratios to improve heat transfer. This project will involve mechanical design, numerical heat transfer analysis and experimental validation using lattices manufactured through Powder Bed Fusion (PBF) techniques.
 
 
 

Centre for Additive Manufacturing

Faculty of Engineering
The University of Nottingham
Nottingham, NG7 2RD


email: CfAM@nottingham.ac.uk