University undergraduate student Jane Israel using a touch screen in the Monica Partridge Building Digital Hub. Friday November 5th 2021.

Hispanic Studies and History BA

University Park Campus, Nottingham, UK

Course overview

If you’re passionate about history but also dream of spending time in a Spanish (or Portuguese for those with A Level Spanish) speaking country and becoming fluent in the language – how do you choose which degree to study: We say, choose both!


This joint honours course allows you to combine your curiosity for human experience with your love of communicating in another language.


With Hispanic Studies modules ranging from ‘Business and Society in Spain’ to ‘Hispanic Cinemas’ and History modules ranging from 'The Past That Won't Go Away: the Spanish Civil War' to 'Modern Latin American History' – you’re able to truly personalise this intercultural degree around your personal interests or career aspirations.

 

Modules

Mandatory

Year 1

Learning History

Optional

Year 1

Spanish 1

Optional

Year 1

Spanish 1: Beginners

Optional

Year 1

Portuguese 1: Beginners

Optional

Year 1

Literature in Spanish

Optional

Year 1

Moder Latin America

Optional

Year 1

Culture and Society in Brazil, Portugal and Portuguese-speaking Africa

Optional

Year 1

Modern Latin American History

Optional

Year 1

Making the Middle Ages, 500-1500

Optional

Year 1

Making of Modern Asia

Optional

Year 1

Roads to Modernity: An Introduction to Modern History 1750-1945

Optional

Year 1

The Contemporary World since 1945

Optional

Year 1

Roads to Modernity: An Introduction to Modern History 1750-1945 (Part 2)

Optional

Year 1

The Contemporary World Since 1945 (Part 2)

Optional

Year 1

Themes in Early Modern European History c.1500-1789

Mandatory

Year 2

Spanish 2

Mandatory

Year 2

Spanish 2: Beginners

Optional

Year 2

Modern Spanish and Spanish American Literature and Film

Optional

Year 2

New World(s): Contacts, Conquests and Conflict in Early Modern Hispanic History and Culture

Optional

Year 2

Hispanic Cinemas

Optional

Year 2

Modern Spanish and Spanish American Literature and Film

Optional

Year 2

Portuguese 2: Beginners

Optional

Year 2

Nations and Nation Building in the Lusophone World

Optional

Year 2

Consumers & Citizens: Society & Culture in 18th Century England

Optional

Year 2

British Foreign Policy and the Origins of the World Wars, 1895-1939

Optional

Year 2

Communities, Crime and Punishment in England c.1500-1800

Optional

Year 2

The Victorians: Life, Thought and Culture

Optional

Year 2

The Second World War and Social Change in Britain, 1939-1951: Went The Day Well?

Optional

Year 2

The Rise of Modern China

Optional

Year 2

Liberating Africa: Decolonisation, Development and the Cold War, 1919-1994

Optional

Year 2

Heroes and Villains in the Middle Ages

Optional

Year 2

The Stranger Next Door: Jews and Christians in the Middle Ages

Optional

Year 2

Sex, Lies and Gossip? Women of Medieval England

Optional

Year 2

International History of the Middle East and North Africa 1918-1995

Optional

Year 2

Imagining 'Britain': Decolonising Tolkien et al

Optional

Year 2

Kingship in Crisis: Politics, People and Power in Late-medieval England

Optional

Year 2

Sexuality in Early Medieval Europe

Optional

Year 2

Environmental History: Nature and the Western World, 1800-2000

Optional

Year 2

Race, Rights and Propaganda: The Politics of Race and Identity in the Cold War Era, 1945-1990

Optional

Year 2

Soviet State and Society

Optional

Year 2

The Venetian Republic, 1450-1575

Optional

Year 2

European Fascisms, 1900-1945

Optional

Year 2

De-industrialisation: A Social and Cultural History, c.1970-1990

Optional

Year 2

The British Empire from Emancipation to the Boer War

Optional

Year 2

Rule and Resistance in Colonial India, c.1757-1857

Optional

Year 2

Poverty, Disease and Disability: Britain, 1795-1930

Optional

Year 2

Travel and Adventure in the Medieval World

Optional

Year 2

Politics and Protest: The Last Hundred Years of Music History

Optional

Year 2

Rethinking the Tudors: Monarchy, Society and Religion in England, 1485-1603

Optional

Year 2

The politics of memory in postwar Western Europe

Optional

Year 2

Commodities, Consumption and Connections the Global World of Things 1500-1800

Optional

Year 2

Gender, Empire, Selfhood: Transgender History in Global Context

Optional

Year 2

America's Borders: Culture at the Limits

Optional

Year 2

African American History and Culture

Optional

Year 2

Business in American Culture

Optional

Year 2

The American Pop Century

Optional

Year 2

American Radicalism

Optional

Year 2

The US and the World in the American Century: US Foreign Policy 1898-2008

Optional

Year 2

History of American Capitalism

Optional

Year 2

The CIA and US Foreign Policy 1945-2012

Optional

Year 2

Work placement

Mandatory

Year 4

Spanish 3

Optional

Year 4

Brazilian Slave Society

Optional

Year 4

Portuguese 3

Optional

Year 4

Culture and Society across the Portuguese-speaking World

Optional

Year 4

Business and Society in Spain

Optional

Year 4

Making the Cuban Revolution: Ideology, Culture and Identity in Cuba since 1959

Optional

Year 4

Literature and Film under Franco

Optional

Year 4

Painting in Spain

Optional

Year 4

Translation, Power and Gender in the Spanish-speaking World

Optional

Year 4

Dissertation in Hispanic Studies

Optional

Year 4

Communicating and Teaching Languages for Undergraduate Ambassadors

Optional

Year 4

Culture, Society and Politics in 20th Century Russia

Optional

Year 4

Faith and Fire: Popular Religion in Late Medieval England

Optional

Year 4

The Black Death

Optional

Year 4

Life During Wartime: Crisis, Decline and Transformation in 1970s America

Optional

Year 4

After the Golden Age: The West in the 1970s & 1980s

Optional

Year 4

British Culture in the Age of Mass Production, 1920-1950

Optional

Year 4

A Green and (un) Pleasant Land? Society, Culture and the Evolution of the British Countryside

Optional

Year 4

The Past That Won't Go Away: The Spanish Civil War, 1936-1939

Optional

Year 4

From Revelation to ISIS: Apocalyptic Thought from the 1st to 21st Century

Optional

Year 4

Plague, Fire and the Reimagining of the Capital 1600-1720: The Making of Modern London

Optional

Year 4

Transnationalising Italy: A History of Modern Italy in a Transnational Perspective

Optional

Year 4

Artistic Licence: Social Satire and Political Caricature in Britain, c1780-c1850

Optional

Year 4

The Celtic Fringe: Scotland and Ireland, c.1066-1603

Optional

Year 4

Napoleonic Europe and its Aftermath, 1799-1848

Optional

Year 4

Recent Queer Writing

Optional

Year 4

The 1960s and the West, 1958-1974

Optional

Year 4

The Reign of Richard II

Optional

Year 4

Russia in Revolution 1905-21

Optional

Year 4

The African Atlantic and the British Slave Trade c.1600-1897

Optional

Year 4

European Politics and Society, 1848-1914

Optional

Year 4

'World wasting itself in blood': Europe and the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648)

Optional

Year 4

The Chimera: British Imperialism and Its Discontents, 1834-1919

Optional

Year 4

The Politics of Thatcherism, 1975-1992

Optional

Year 4

Rebels Against Empire: Anticolonialism and British Imperialism in the Mid-20th Century

Optional

Year 4

Slavery, Caste and Capitalism: Labouring Lives in Global History, 1750-2000

Optional

Year 4

Voices from North Africa: Resistance, Decolonisation and State-Building in the Twentieth Century

Optional

Year 4

From Serf to Proletarian: The Russian Peasantry 1825-1932

Optional

Year 4

Britain on Film

Optional

Year 4

Life during wartime: crisis, decline and transformation in 1970s america

Optional

Year 4

The Agony and the Ecstasy: Drugs for Pleasure and Pain in the History of Medicine

Optional

Year 4

Italy and the Second World War

Optional

Year 4

Napoleonic Europe and its Aftermath, 1799-1848

Optional

Year 4

The Silk Road: cultural interactions and perceptions

Optional

Year 4

Mapping the Humanities

Optional

Year 4

The Turbulent Friar: Martin Luther and the Origins of Protestantism

Optional

Year 4

Cultures of Power and the Power of Culture in Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany

Optional

Year 4

The War of the Roses

Optional

Year 4

Alternatives to War: The British Peace Movement, 1870-1945

Optional

Year 4

China: from Revolution to Socialism

Optional

Year 4

Saving Europe: Atrocity and Humanitarianism across the twentieth century

Optional

Year 4

US Foreign Policy, 1989 - present

Optional

Year 4

Popular Music Cultures and Countercultures

Optional

Year 4

Sexuality in American History

Optional

Year 4

Britain in the Later Roman Empire (c. 250-450)

Optional

Year 4

Troubled Empire: The Projection of American Global Power from Pearl Harbor to Covid-19

Optional

Year 4

Heritage and the media

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About modules

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules (including methods of assessment) may change or be updated, or modules may be cancelled, over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. This content was last updated on Wednesday 22 February 2023.

When you begin studying at university, you will probably find that you cover material much more quickly than you did while studying for your A levels. The key to success is preparing well for classes and then taking the ideas you encounter further in your own time.

Lectures – provide an overview of what you are studying, using a variety of audio and visual materials to support your learning.

Seminars and workshops – give you the chance to explore and interact with the material presented in lectures in a friendly and informal environment. You will be taught in a smaller group of students, with discussion focusing on a text or topic you've previously prepared.

Workshops are more practical, perhaps through exploring texts, working with digital materials, or developing presentations.

Tutorials – individual and small-group tutorials let you explore your work with your module tutor, perhaps discussing plans for an essay or presentation, or following up on an area of a module which has interested you.

eLearning – our virtual-learning system, Moodle, offers 24-hour access to teaching materials and resources.

Peer mentoring

All new undergraduate students can opt into our peer mentoring scheme. Your peer mentor will help you settle into life at Nottingham, provide advice on the transition to university-level study and help you access support if needed.  

The majority of the language teaching you will experience on this degree will be led by native speakers.

Class sizes vary depending on topic and type. A weekly lecture on a core module may have 50-60 students attending while a specialised seminar may only contain 10 students.

Teaching quality

Our staff know that studying complex subjects can sometimes seem challenging (they've all been where you are!). Their contributions to high quality teaching and learning are recognised through our annual Lord Dearing Awards. View the full list of recipients.

Teaching methods

  • Lectures
  • Oral classes
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

You will be assessed by a wide variety of methods, consisting mainly of coursework and exams, but you may also be tasked with commentaries, dissertations, group work, in-class tests, portfolios and presentations.

Each module has its own methods of assessment and we strive to make these as varied as possible so that everyone can perform to the best of their abilities. When choosing optional modules, you will be able to see how the module is assessed in advance.

Assessment methods

  • Dissertation
  • Essay
  • In-class test
  • Oral exam
  • Presentation
  • Written exam
  • Commentary

As well as scheduled teaching you’ll carry out extensive independent reading and research. A typical 20 credit module involves between three and four hours of lectures and seminars per week. You would ideally spend 8-10 hours doing preparation work.

Studying languages can open up a world of opportunities. From banking to charities and from teaching to MI5, businesses and organisations across the globe seek to employ language specialists.


During this degree you’ll be able to choose from a wide range of modules, allowing you to tailor your studies around personal interests. In doing so you’ll start to identify potential career paths and begin to discover your areas of professional interest.


In addition to language skills, you’ll develop transferable skills highly sought after by employers such as confident communication skills, strict attention to detail and the ability to work within different cultures and organisational styles.


Combining language studies with history will help you develop critical reasoning skills, becoming an innovative problem solver able to communicate effectively.


“My [language] studies have helped me to develop excellent communication skills, as well as helping me to hone my reading, writing, listening and speaking skills for both my target languages.  I have also become a much more resilient learner, being able to persevere when things start to get tough and independently solve issues where possible.” Charlotte Allwood , French and Contemporary Chinese Studies BA


Find out more about careers of Modern Language students

Average starting salary and career progression

78.9% of undergraduates from the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures secured graduate level employment or further study within 15 months of graduation. The average annual salary for these graduates was £24,904.*

*HESA Graduate Outcomes 2019/20 data published in 2022. The Graduate Outcomes % is derived using The Guardian University Guide methodology. The average annual salary is based on graduates working full-time within the UK.

90.1% of undergraduates from SCHOOL/COURSE NAME secured graduate level employment or further study within 15 months of graduation. The average annual salary for these graduates was £25,542.*

*HESA Graduate Outcomes 2019/20 data published in 2022. The Graduate Outcomes % is derived using The Guardian University Guide methodology. The average annual salary is based on graduates working full-time within the UK.

Studying for a degree at the University of Nottingham will provide you with the type of skills and experiences that will prove invaluable in any career, whichever direction you decide to take.


Throughout your time with us, our Careers and Employability Service can work with you to improve your employability skills even further; assisting with job or course applications, searching for appropriate work experience placements and hosting events to bring you closer to a wide range of prospective employers.


Have a look at our careers page for an overview of all the employability support and opportunities that we provide to current students.


The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain’s leading graduate employers (Ranked in the top ten in The Graduate Market in 2013-2020, High Fliers Research).

University undergraduate student Cole Pearce studying in Nightingale Hall accommodation's library, University Park. November 5th 2021.

Course data