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Civil Engineering BEng

   
   
  

Fact file - 2015 entry

UCAS code:H201
Qualification:BEng Hons
Type and duration:3 year UG
Qualification name:Civil Engineering
A level offer: AAA-AAB
Required subjects: including Mathematics; also including one of the following subjects – Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Design and Technology, Geography, Geology, Computing, Further Maths; excluding - General Studies, Critical Thinking, Citizenship Studies.
IB score: 36-34 (6 points required from Mathematics at higher level and 6 points required at a Science subject at higher level (preferably Physics)
Available part time: no
Course places: 100 places available for all courses across the department.
Campus: University Park Campus 

Course overview

Our flagship course provides a solid grounding in core subjects, including structures, geotechnics, materials, fluids, surveying and construction management, with opportunities for MEng students to specialise in key areas such as transportation in later years. There are projects for all students in all years. They cover design, surveying and research in a range of topics.

Year one 

In your first year you will be introduced to the core disciplines and the context of civil engineering; engineering design is introduced through project work. There is also a residential surveying field course and the opportunity to take optional modules.

Year two

Your core subjects will be developed in greater depth alongside further optional modules; major design-based project to help you see the application of your studies.

Year three 

Core subjects continue alongside a range of elective modules; individual investigative project.

Links with industry

We pride ourselves on our strong links with industry, and encourage students to take part in the opportunities they offer. Find out how an industrial placement might contribute to both your employability and university experience.
 

Entry requirements

A levels: AAA-AAB, including Mathematics; also including one of the following subjects - Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Design and Technology, Geography, Geology, Computing, Further Maths; excluding - General Studies, Critical Thinking, Citizenship Studies.

English language requirements 

IELTS 6.0 (no less than 5.5 in any element)

Pearson Test of English (Academic) 55 (minimum 51)

Alternative qualifications

For details please see alternative qualifications page

Foundation year - a foundation year is available for this course

Flexible admissions policy

We may make some applicants an offer lower than advertised, depending on their personal and educational circumstances.

Modules

The modules we offer are inspired by the research interests of our staff. They’re also shaped by new developments in industry and as a consequence, may change from year to year. The following list is therefore subject to change but should give you a flavour of the modules on offer. 


Typical Year One Modules

Engineering Mathematics 1
This module introduces the algebra of complex numbers to provide a key mathematical tool for analysis of linear mathematical and engineering problems. The complexity of solving general systems of equations is introduced and their study using matrix techniques. You’ll spend around three hours per week in lectures and workshops.

 
Engineering Mathematics 2
You’ll be introduced to techniques for solving selected first-order and second-order differential equations relevant to the analysis of generic engineering problems. The module also provides mathematical tools in terms of advanced differential calculus and vectors for modelling of generic engineering situations given in terms of multi-dimensional models. You’ll spend around three hours per week in lectures and workshops.

 
Industry and Profession
This module introduces you to the construction industry and the civil engineering profession and how they operate. This includes focusing on matters of procurement, ethics, safety and sustainability. You’ll investigate the roles and responsibilities of civil engineers in the various common areas of employment through one 2-hour lectures per week. 

 
Construction Issues
This module introduces you to a range of important considerations, particularly economic, safety and environmental matters, when planning the construction of infrastructure projects. You’ll outline key types of plant and equipment for construction work and be introduced to techniques for assessing the productivity of plant and gain an awareness of caring for the environment in the broadest sense. You’ll have a one 2-hour lecture per week.

 
Sustainable Transport Planning
This module considers recent transport policy history and its effects and introduces various measures that encourage travel behavioural change.  You will spend three hours in lectures each week when studying this module.

 
Geotechnics 1
Giving you an introduction to the core areas of geotechnics, this module covers topics such as: origin and types of soil, soil as a 3-phase material, soil description and classification, compaction, water in soils, basic mechanics, and stresses is soils and ground investigation. In an average week you’ll spend 4 hours of lectures and practicals per week.H21H11 Hydraulics 1

 
Hydraulics 1
This module introduces you to the fundamental principles of hydrostatics and enables you to apply these principles to model problems relevant to civil engineering. You’ll spend around four hours in lectures each week to study for this module.

 
Structural and Engineering Mechanics
This module introduces and develops the concepts of static mechanics and will help you to apply them to the analysis of statically determinate structures. You’ll spend three hours in lectures and three hours in practicals each week to study this module.

 
Engineering Communication
This module introduces topics basic to communication of design in the field of civil engineering.  You’ll spend 8 hours in seminars, 3 hours in practicals and 1 hour of lectures per week to study this module.

 
Engineering Surveying 1
This module provides you with an introduction to engineering surveying, covering: introduction to Coordinates, fundamentals of measurement errors, and survey practice and cartography, among others. You’ll have a three hour lecture each week as well as attend a residential field course lasing 6 days during the Easter vacation.

 
Structural Mechanics and Vibration
Through three hours of lectures each week, this module covers the following topics: analysis of stresses and strains, virtual work method, stain energy method and analysis of arches and cables, among others.

 
Civil Engineering Materials
This module will introduce engineering materials and their basic properties, as well as principles in material selection and sustainability. You’ll develop a basic understanding of the behaviour of metals, in particular steel through a weekly one hour lecture and three hour practical.

 
 


Typical Year Two Modules

Engineering Surveying 2
You’ll be introduced to more advanced aspects and techniques of Engineering Surveying. You’ll spend 3 hours in lectures and 3 hours in practicals each week when studying this module. 

 
Differential Equations and Calculus for Engineers
This module will provide you with the techniques for solving selected classes of ordinary differential equations relevant to the analysis of engineering topics. You’ll spend around 3 hours in lectures and workshops each week to study this module.

 
Probabilistic and Statistical Techniques for Engineers
This module introduces the mathematic skill needed for use of probabilistically based models of uncertain engineering problems and to use statistical methods to interpret the solutions. You’ll spend around three hours in lectures and workshops each week when studying this module.

 
Transport Infrastructure
The module considers particular types of transport-related construction. This module will provide students with an insight into the processes involved with the design, construction and maintenance of various forms of transport infrastructure. You will spend three hours in lectures each week when studying this module.

 
Water in the Environment
On successfully completing the module, students will have developed a broad knowledge of the occurrence and management of water in the natural and urban environments. You’ll spend threehours in lectures each week when studying this module.

 
Civil Engineering Project 2
This module aims to introduce the design process in the context of civil engineering. You’ll gain knowledge in and practice the conceptual and detailed design of engineering structures. You’ll spend 8 hours in workshops each week when studying this module.

 
Geotechnics 2
This module aims to develop further understanding of fundamental behaviour of soils and you will learn how to perform geotechnical analyses. You’ll spend five hours in lectures and two hours in practicals per week.

 
Hydraulics 2
On successfully completing the module, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the fundamental principles of fluid dynamics. You’ll be able to solve simple pipe flow problems and demonstrate awareness of open channel flows and boundary layers and drag. You’ll spend four hours in lectures and two hours in practicals each week when studying this module.

 
Construction Project Management 1
The module provides students with a preliminary background in the field of civil engineering construction project management. You’ll spend 3 hours in lectures each week when studying this module.

 
Non-Linear Analysis of Structures
This module aims to develop an understanding of the instability of structural systems and plastic methods of analysis and design. You’ll spend three hours in lectures and three hours in practicals each week when studying this module.

 
Indeterminate Structures
This module aims to introduce torsion and statically indeterminate structures and the flexibility and stiffness methods of solving them. You’ll spend three hours in lectures and three hours in computing sessions each week when studying this module.

 
 


Typical Final Year Modules

Compulsory

Concrete and Concrete Structures
Structural design is extended into the use of concrete and more advanced techniques of analysis are introduced by this module. You’ll spend three hours in lectures, two hours in practicals and four hours in workshops each week when studying this module.

 
Geotechnics 3
This module extends principles into the areas of steady state and transient groundwater flow and seepage. You’ll spend four hours in lectures and four hours in practicals each week when studying this module.

 
Hydraulics 3
This module aims to introduce students to the simple mathematics models used to analyse unsteady flows in pipes, and some basic empirical models for describing the process of sediment transport. You’ll spend four hours in lectures each week when studying this module.

 
BEng Individual Investigative Project
This module offers students the opportunity to undertake an individual investigative project on a topic related to their particular interests. It normally involves a thorough literature review, plus relevant design or data collection and analysis, culminating in the production of a project report of about 8,000 words. 

 
Construction Project Management 2
This module examines the following areas for the management of construction projects: Construction productivity and project planning, Estimating and tendering for construction, Introduction to practical planning, project reporting techniques, and control of construction projects. You’ll spend three hours in lectures per week when studying this module.

 


Optional

Mathematics for Engineering Management
The module examines and classifies various (non-statistical) management and operational research problems and their formulation and techniques for solution. You’ll spend around 3 hours in lectures and workshops each week when studying this module.

 
Advanced Mathematical Techniques in Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers
This module covers advanced analytic mathematical techniques used to provide exact or approximate solutions to common classes of ordinary differential equations typical in Engineering. You’ll spend around three hours in lectures and workshops per week when studying this module.

 
Pavement Engineering
This module will provide students with a basic understanding of the properties of granular, bituminous and cement bound materials and their application to the structural design, evaluation and maintenance of road pavements. You’ll spend around three hours in lectures and workshops per week when studying this module.

 
Steel Structures
This module will build on the basic understanding of the behaviour and design of steel structures by considering elements and connections in more detail, by recognising the importance of fabrication and erection on economics, and by explaining the basis for new design codes. You’ll spend three hours lectures each week when studying this module.

 
Foundations and Earthworks
This module aims to develop your understanding of the theoretical and application aspects of airborne photogrammetery and airborne and mobile laser scanning. You’ll spend three hours in lectures each week when studying this module.

 
Mapping for Engineering Surveying and GIS
The module describes the theoretical and practical aspects of photogrammetry and geometrical remote sensing. Subjects covered include: single and multi image/photograph geometry, digital imagery and processing, and data capture techniques and products, among others. You’ll have three 1-hour lectures per week.

 
Mapping for Engineering Surveying and GIS Practical
Students work individually and in small groups on projects involving the planning and the carrying out of observational and computational aspects of surveying for engineering and/or deformation applications. Individuals and groups are also responsible for management and organisation of their projects. You’ll spend around one hour in lectures each week when studying this module. 

 
Railway Engineering
This module will introduce the components of railway track structures, conventional and otherwise. It will include analysis of forces on a railway track and consequent deflections, stresses etc, alignment design principles, and an overview of the railway as a total system including operational issues, signalling and control. You’ll spend three hours in lectures each week when studying this module.

 
Environmental Geotechnology
This module aims to develop an understanding of soil-contaminant interactions. You will study the mechanisms of contaminant transport and be introduced to the available technologies utilised for contaminant containment. You’ll spend three hours in lectures each week when studying this module.

 
Computerised Mathematical Methods in Engineering
The methodology and associated numerical techniques are introduced to enable a selection of mathematical operations to be evaluated with the use of computer-based software algorithms to problems that cannot be solved analytically. You’ll spend around three hours in lectures and workshops each week when studying this module.

 
Sustainable Construction
This module is designed to deliver an understanding of sustainability principles and how civil engineering and the wider construction industry can contribute to sustainable development. You’ll spend three hours in lectures each week when studying this module.

 
Experiments in Fluid Mechanics
In small groups, the student will carry out a series of four experiments exploring a wide range of fluid mechanical applications. These experiments will be set in context by a theoretical background session. You’ll spend around eight hours in lectures and workshops each week and group study sessions.

 
 

Careers

Students will be equipped to embark on a career in civil engineering, or other disciplines that require numerate problem-solving graduates. MEng graduates will have the breadth and depth of knowledge to reach the top in their chosen career.

Find out how our links with industry could give you a headstart while you study with us.
 

Professional accreditation

BEng (Hons) Accredited CEng (Partial)

This degree is accredited as:

  1. fully satisfying the educational base for an Incorporated Engineer (IEng).
  2. partially satisfying the educational base for a Chartered Engineer (CEng). 

A programme of accredited Further Learning will be required to complete the educational base for CEng. 

See www.jbm.org.uk for further information and details of Further Learning programmes for CEng.

Engineering Council accredited degree
 

This degree has been accredited by

Under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council . Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

 

Average starting salary and career progression

In 2013, 92.5% of first-degree graduates in the Department of Civil Engineering who were available for employment had secured work or further study within six months of graduation. The average starting salary was £22,246 with the highest being £28,000.*

* Known destinations of full-time home and EU graduates, 2012/13.

Careers Support and Advice

Studying for a degree at The University of Nottingham will provide you with the type of skills and experiences that will prove invaluable in any career, whichever direction you decide to take. Throughout your time with us, our Careers and Employability Service can work with you to improve your employability skills even further; assisting with job or course applications, searching for appropriate work experience placements and hosting events to bring you closer to a wide range of prospective employers.

Have a look at our Careers page for an overview of all the employability support and opportunities that we provide to current students.  

Funding

Scholarships and bursaries

The University of Nottingham offers a wide range of bursaries and scholarships. These funds can provide you with an additional source of non-repayable financial help.

Home students*

There are several types of bursary and scholarship on offer. Download our funding guide or visit our financial support pages to find out more about tuition fees, loans, budgeting and sources of funding.

To be eligible to apply for most of these funds you must be liable for the £9,000 tuition fee and not be in receipt of a bursary from outside the University.

* A 'home' student is one who meets certain UK residence criteria. These are the same criteria as apply to eligibility for home funding from Student Finance.

International/EU students

The International Office provides support and advice on financing your degree and offers a number of scholarships to help you with tuition fees and living costs.

KIS

Key Information Sets (KIS)

KIS is an initiative that the government has introduced to allow you to compare different courses and universities.

 

How to use the data

The Enquiry Centre

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