University undergraduate studying in the Monica Partridge building lecture theatre. Friday November 5th 2021.Francis Adam

Archaeology and Geography BA

University Park Campus, Nottingham, UK

Course overview

How do human societies develop and continue? What impact does climate and the environment have on society? Geography and archaeology are natural partners for exploring questions like these.

Indicative modules

Mandatory

Year 1

Careers Skills for Geographers

Mandatory

Year 1

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

Mandatory

Year 1

Tutorial

Mandatory

Year 1

Understanding the Past I

Mandatory

Year 1

Understanding the Past II

Optional

Year 1

Comparative World Prehistory

Optional

Year 1

Rome to Revolution: Historical Archaeology of Britain

Optional

Year 1

Exploring Human Geography

Optional

Year 1

Planet Earth: Exploring the Physical Environment

Optional

Year 1

Exploring Place

Optional

Year 1

Globalisation: Economy, Space and Power

Optional

Year 1

On Earth and Life

Optional

Year 1

Global Challenges

Mandatory

Year 2

Archaeology: Theory and Practice

Optional

Year 2

Communicating the Past

Optional

Year 2

Archaeology of Anglo Saxon England

Optional

Year 2

The Silk Road: Cultural Interactions and Perceptions

Optional

Year 2

Themes in Near Eastern Prehistory

Optional

Year 2

Pompeii: Art and Culture in a Roman Town

Optional

Year 2

Osteology

Optional

Year 2

Themes in Near Eastern Prehistory

Optional

Year 2

The World of the Minoans

Optional

Year 2

Italy before the Romans

Optional

Year 2

Ancient Metallurgy

Optional

Year 2

Cultural and Historical Geography

Optional

Year 2

The Changing Environment

Optional

Year 2

Dissertation Preparation

Optional

Year 2

Research Tutorial

Optional

Year 2

Economic Geography

Optional

Year 2

Spatial Decision Making

Optional

Year 2

Techniques in Human Geography

Optional

Year 2

Techniques in Physical Geography

Optional

Year 2

Urban Geography

Optional

Year 2

Medical Geography

Optional

Year 2

Political Geography

Optional

Year 3

Dissertation in Classics and Archaeology

Optional

Year 3

Dissertation in Geography

Optional

Year 3

The Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England

Optional

Year 3

The Origins and Rise of Aegean Civilisation

Optional

Year 3

The Silk Road: Cultural Interactions and Perceptions

Optional

Year 3

Themes in Near Eastern Prehistory

Optional

Year 3

Pompeii: Art and Culture in a Roman Town

Optional

Year 3

Osteology

Optional

Year 3

Themes in Near Eastern Prehistory

Optional

Year 3

The World of the Minoans

Optional

Year 3

Italy before the Romans

Optional

Year 3

Ancient Metallurgy

Optional

Year 3

"Otherness" in Classical Art

Optional

Year 3

Third Year Geography Field Course

Optional

Year 3

Global Climate Change

Optional

Year 3

Landscape, Culture and Politics

Optional

Year 3

Unearthing the Past

Optional

Year 3

Geographies of Violence

Optional

Year 3

Health Geographies

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About modules

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer, but is not intended to be construed or relied on as a definitive list of what might be available in any given year. This content was last updated on Thursday 13 June 2024.

You will be taught via a mixture of large-group lectures and smaller, interactive seminars.

You will also have practical teaching:

  • In one of our archaeology labs – dedicated to the study of materials, bones, zooarchaeology, archaeobotany, and isotope preparation
  • Out in the field – as part of the compulsory fieldwork project and also via practical training at nearby Wollaton Hall

Support

All new undergraduate students are allocated a peer mentor, to help you settle into life at Nottingham.

You are also assigned a personal tutor at the start of each academic year. Your personal tutor oversees your academic development and personal welfare.

Find out more about the support on offer.

Teaching quality

100% of our class of 2020 graduated with a 1st or 2:1 degree classification. Source: UoN student outcomes data, Annual Monitoring (QDS) Analyses 2020.

Nine academics from the Department of Classics and Archaeology have received Advance HE recognition for their contribution to education, becoming Teaching Fellows.

Teaching methods

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops
  • Field trips
  • Lab sessions
  • Practical classes

For the Archaeology side of your course:

Our courses are modular, and range from full-year to semester-long modules. Assessment normally takes place towards the end of each semester, while beginners’ language modules are usually assessed by a coursework portfolio running throughout the semester.

Assessment methods – assessment is based on a combination of coursework, including essays, research projects and the dissertation, oral presentations, and formal examinations. The precise assessments vary between modules and across the years of your degree. Some of our modules (such as 'Communicating the Past', or 'Classics and Comics') include the option of producing more artistic or creative coursework projects.

"I designed several T-shirts and hoodies which conveyed information about the site’s art and architecture, history, and its eventual ruination by ISIL in 2015. I wanted to combine my interest of fashion with my love for the Classical world, and this project gave me the opportunity to do so."

- Alexander Gadd, on his experience doing the 'Communicating the Past' module

Feedback – we offer detailed written comments on all coursework, and the opportunity to discuss ideas and coursework with your tutor is an integral part of your studies at Nottingham. Whether by giving feedback on an essay plan or discussing the results of an assessment, we help you work to the best of your ability. There are appointed days in each semester to get feedback from tutors and module convenors, as well as other opportunities to discuss pieces of work.

Assessment methods

  • Essay
  • Portfolio (written/digital)
  • Presentation
  • Reflective review
  • Written exam

You’ll have at least the following hours of timetabled contact a week through lectures, seminars and workshops, tutorials and supervisions.

  • Year one: minimum of 12 hours
  • Year two: minimum of 10 hours
  • Final year: minimum of 8 hours

Your tutors will also be available outside these times to discuss issues and develop your understanding. We reduce your contact hours as you work your way through the course. As you progress, we expect you to assume greater responsibility for your studies and work more independently.

Your tutors will all be qualified academics. You will have a personal tutor from the Department of Classics and Archaeology and a joint honours adviser from the School of Geography.

Sizes of lectures and seminars vary according to topic. A popular lecture may be up to 250 participants, with specialised seminars of 10.

As well as scheduled teaching you’ll carry out extensive self-study such as:

  • reading
  • locating and analysing primary sources
  • planning and writing essays and other assessed work
  • collaborating with fellow students

As a guide, 20 credits (a typical module) is approximately 200 hours of work (combined teaching and self-study).

On this course you will also undertake 10 days of fieldwork. This usually takes place during the summer break and can involve up to five days in a museum or similar environment.

A degree in archaeology or geography can give you a wide range of transferable skills, including:

  • creativity
  • accuracy
  • research skills
  • communication (both oral and written)
  • data analysis
  • presentation
  • teamwork

Read our Classics and Archaeology student and alumni profiles for more about the range of skills you will gain, as well as the careers which our graduates go into.

You can learn more about subject-related careers opportunities from our Careers and Employability Services:

Average starting salary and career progression

78.8% of undergraduates from the Faculty of Arts secured graduate level employment or further study within 15 months of graduation. The average annual starting salary for these graduates was £23,974.

85.7% of undergraduates from the Faculty of Social Sciences secured graduate level employment or further study within 15 months of graduation. The average annual starting salary for these graduates was £29,197.

HESA Graduate Outcomes (2017 to 2021 cohorts). The Graduate Outcomes % is calculated using The Guardian University Guide methodology. The average annual salary is based on graduates working full-time within the UK.

Studying for a degree at the University of Nottingham will provide you with the type of skills and experiences that will prove invaluable in any career, whichever direction you decide to take.

Throughout your time with us, our Careers and Employability Service can work with you to improve your employability skills even further; assisting with job or course applications, searching for appropriate work experience placements and hosting events to bring you closer to a wide range of prospective employers.

Have a look at our careers page for an overview of all the employability support and opportunities that we provide to current students.

The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain’s leading graduate employers (Ranked in the top ten in The Graduate Market in 2013-2020, High Fliers Research).

University undergraduate students studying in the Monica Partridge Building Digital Hub. Friday November 5th 2021.Khaqan Khan (red jumper); Megan Mahoney (blue top); Cole Pearce and Sara Bintey Kabir (yellow top).

Course data

Open Day June 2022