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Course overview

Electronic engineers design, develop, test, and oversee the creation of anything from drones and electric cars to the technology in smartphones, sat navs and systems in hospitals.

All our electrical and electronic courses have the same content in year one and two so by year three, you can choose the topics that interest you. A lot of the things you learn will be done in labs working individually and in group projects.

Why choose this course?

  • Ranked 2nd in the UK for electrical and electronic engineering in The Guardian University Guide, 2021
  • Practical, lab-based sessions to help you develop skills for your future career
  • Customise your degree to suit your interests with a wide selection of optional modules

Entry requirements

All candidates are considered on an individual basis and we accept a broad range of qualifications. The entrance requirements below apply to 2021 entry.

UK entry requirements
A level offer AAA-ABB including maths and one of electronics, physics, biology, chemistry, Design and Technology (D&T): Systems Control or Design Technology: Design Engineering excluding citizenship studies, critical thinking and general studies.
IB score IB 36-32 inc 5/6 in Higher Level maths or 6/7 in Standard Level maths and 5/6 at Higher Level in one of biology, chemistry or physics. We also accept the following IB Mathematics courses: Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches = 5/6 at Higher Level or 6/7 at Standard Level, and Mathematics: Applications and Interpretation = 5/6 at Higher Level only.

Maths and a science or electronics subject, plus a third subject (electronics, physics, chemistry or biology preferred) excluding citizenship studies, critical thinking and general studies.

Foundation progression options

A foundation year is available for those with BBB grades but not in the required subjects.

Learning and assessment

How you will learn

Teaching methods

  • Group study
  • Independent study
  • Lab sessions
  • Lectures
  • Practical classes
  • Supervision
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

How you will be assessed

Assessment methods

  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Examinations
  • Group coursework
  • Practical exams
  • Presentation
  • Research project
  • Practical assessment

Contact time and study hours

On average, you will have around 20 contact hours a week in year one and two. Combined with coursework and self-study, you may spend over 40 hours a week on your studies.

Modules

This year is common to all courses in the Electrical and Electronic Engineering department. Giving you the flexibility to change course at the end of the year. You will gain an understanding of the principles and practices on which all specialisms within electrical and electronic engineering are founded.

Core

Applied Electrical and Electronic Engineering Construction Project

Accounting for one third of the year, this module involves the development of an autonomous vehicle, building on the knowledge acquired within other components of the course. The work will be laboratory based and undertaken in project weeks, providing a break from lectures in each semester.

Engineering Mathematics 1

This module introduces you to the algebra of complex numbers providing a key mathematical tool for analysis of linear mathematical and engineering problems. You will have one 3-hour lecture and workshops each week where you will study the complexity of solving general systems of equations using matrix techniques and review the calculus of a single variable.

Information Systems

This module is an introduction to electronic systems and information. It takes a “top down” approach which means you start with the big picture and work towards the more detailed view. You will begin by looking at signals, then analogue/digital systems and then move on to electronic devices and communications systems.

Power and Energy

In this module you will be given an introduction to the fundamental concepts and challenges related to the generation and use of electrical energy, both from traditional and renewable resources, in a world that relies on secure electricity supplies.

Contemporary Engineering Themes A

This module will provide you an introduction to a variety of electrical and electronic themes that are found in contemporary systems.

This module provides an introduction to a variety of themes that are at the forefront of contemporary electrical and electronic engineering systems. The presentations will cover criticaltechnological enablers and breakthroughs and their commercial and socio-economic impactwhich drive the engineering research and development process. This provides a broader contextfor the material covered in the co-requisite modules. The topics covered will vary each year andtypical subjects might include:

  • Smart Grids
  • Medical Electronics
  • Electric Transportation
  • Big Data

For students on an IET-accredited plan, this course and all assessment elements contributing to the overall mark are non-compensatable (with the pass mark being set at 40%).

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules may change or be updated over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for the latest information on available modules.

Your design skills will be developed through a variety of laboratory-based subjects.

Group projects, presentations and seminars enable you to gain the skills and understanding essential for the workplace.

Core

Contemporary Engineering Themes

This module introduces a variety of themes that are at the forefront of contemporary electrical and electronic engineering systems. The presentations will cover critical technological enablers and breakthroughs and their commercial and socio-economic impact, which drive the engineering research and development process.

This provides a broader context for the material covered in the co-requisite modules. The topics covered will vary each year and typical subjects might include:

  • Smart Grids
  • Bio-sensing
  • Medical Electronics
  • Photonics
  • Electric Transportation
  • The Internet of Things
Electrical Energy Conditioning and Control

This module provides an introduction to the underpinning technologies for the conditioning, control and conversion of electrical energy. The topics covered in this module include power electronics, control, electrical machines and renewable energy.

Electronic Processing and Communications

In this module you will study intermediate level electronic analogue circuits and their use within more complex systems. You will also learn about digital design techniques and software tools and communications systems. The final topic that this module covers is the sources and impact of noise and interference – a key topic for any electrical and electronic engineer.

Modelling: Methods and Tools

Electrical and electronic engineers are often required to analyse and solve the problems they encounter. This module gives you the skills to start modelling these problems yourself and includes the required mathematical background as well as the application of suitable software tools.

Some topics covered in this module include analysis techniques for dynamic systems with application to communications and control theory, analysis techniques for digital systems and statistical analysis of signals and data.

Practical Engineering Design Solutions and Project Development

This module acts as a partner to the lecture modules in the second year. It gives you the chance to put your theoretical knowledge into practice through a selected range of activities drawn from the design and development cycle. You will undertake two group projects, one drawn from the power and energy theme the other from the electronics and communications theme.

The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules may change or be updated over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for the latest information on available modules.

Choose from a range of specialist topics, with flexibility to maintain a broad base or focus on specific technologies.

Core

Advanced Engineering Mathematics (spring)

This module covers advanced analytic mathematical techniques used to provide exact or approximate solutions to common classes of ordinary differential equations (ODES) typical in Engineering. Techniques covered include: method of variation of parameters, Laplace transform methods, Taylor series method, Frobenius method, asymptotic regular perturbations and strained coordinates and multiple scales. Each week there will normally be one 1-hour lecture and a two-hour workshop to introduce key mathematical knowledge on module topics.

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Laboratory 5 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 11 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 25.00  
Exam 75.00  
Analogue Electronics (autumn)

This module covers the design and analysis of electronic systems used in telecommunications particularly wireless devices. Devices covered typically include amplifiers, oscillators, phase-locked loops and mixers.

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 7 weeks 2 weeks 2 hours
Lecture 4 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Practicum 4 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 50.00 Investigation of design issues in single transistor amplifiers, plus submission of schematics plus final report that should be no larger than 10 pages in length.
Exam 50.00 Two hour exam

 

Group Project

As part of the course, you will undertake a project as a member of a group. This module enables you to build on your knowledge and put it into practice. 

Professional Studies

This module introduces a diverse set of topics that a graduate engineer is likely to encounter upon entering employment. This will equip them with the knowledge to be able to write and assess rudimentary business plans and make informed decisions about product and business development. It includes various models, tools and concepts that are common within the business community including: Belbin’s model of team formation, the appropriate use of PEST and SWOT analysis, the basics of marketing, the product life cycle, technology audits, sources of finance, intellectual property, ethics and product design. The generation of an idea for a new product and its development into a Business Plan serves as both the primary means of assessment and a way of discussing topics in a meaningful setting.

Optional

Digital Communications

This module is an introduction to the operation of modern digital communication systems. During two one-hour lectures each week, you’ll cover topics such as: communication systems, information content and channel capacity, digital modulation techniques, data compression techniques, error-correcting and line coding techniques, digital signal regeneration techniques and system examples.

Electrical Machines, Drive Systems and Applications

This module provides you with an understanding of the operational characteristics of common electrical machines (dc, ac induction, ac synchronous and stepping). Both theoretical and practical characteristics are covered including: electromagnetic theory applied to electrical machines, principles and structure of dc machines - commutation effects, principles and structure of induction machines, principles and structure of synchronous machines, parameterisation for performance prediction and machine testing and evaluation. You’ll have two one-hour lectures per week, supplemented with practical demonstrations for study of this module. 

Embedded Computing

This module aims to introduce principal generic and distinctive features of embedded computing, and develop practical skills in designing firmware for PIC16 microcontrollers using assembly language. You'll have a two-hour lecture each week for study of this module.

Integrated Circuits and Systems

The module introduces CMOS integrated circuit design and internal operating mechanisms of semiconductor electronics and opto-electronic devices. 

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 2 weeks 2 hours
Practicum  11 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight
Coursework 50.00
Exam 50.00
IT Infrastructure and Cyber Security

Providing you with the skills required to commission a complete IT system, this module provides information on network design and implementation, services, security and management of systems. You’ll be introduced to new uses of IT infrastructure (such as VoIP) and will have one one-hour lecture per week. 

Mobile Technologies

This module provides the knowledge of the fundamentals of mobile communications and its application to real systems.

Optical Networks

To introduce students to the concepts and operating principles of optical communication systems and networks and the devices that underpin them. Topics typically include characteristics of optical fibres and a range of active and passive optical devices such as for example transmitters, detectors, amplifiers, multiplexers, filters and couplers.

Power Electronic Applications and Control

Providing an understanding of the operational principles of power electronic converters and their associated systems, this module covers: 3-phase naturally commutated ac-dc/dc-ac converters, capacitive and inductive smoothing - device ratings, dc-ac PWM inverters and modulation strategies, resonant converters, high power factor utility interface circuits and power converter topologies for high power (multilevel). You’ll have two one-hour lectures per week.

Power Networks

This module provides you with an understanding of power system apparatus and their behaviour under normal and fault conditions. Through a two hour lecture each week, you’ll cover topics such as: concept and analysis of load flow, voltage/current symmetrical components, computation of fault currents, economic optimisation, power-system control and stability, power system protection and power quality.

Renewable Generation Technologies (spring)

This module covers the analysis and design of renewable and sustainable energy systems. It covers the various types of renewable energy and the resources available. It uses an understanding of the physical principles of various types of energy resources in order to develop analytical models which can be applied to the design of renewable energy systems, including energy conversion and storage, especially for electrical power generation.

It includes;

  • Wind power: wind probability distributions, wind turbine performance and control, comparison of generator types
  • Hydro and tidal power: resource assessment, turbine types and principles
  • Solar power, including PV cell equivalent circuit, analysis of losses, matching to DC and AC power systems
  • Wave power systems, including wave energy characteristics, types of energy converter
  • Characteristics of synchronous and induction generators
  • Embedded generation; types of generator and operation of RE within the power system
  • Economic and environmental assessment of energy conversion technologies.

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours

 

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 25.00 Sustainable energy case study: A written report.
Exam 75.00 Two Hour Paper. The examination will be based on the whole of the course.
Robotics, Dynamics and Control (spring)

This module gives and Introduction to electromechanical fundamentals in robotics, and introduces students to:

  • Direct Kinematics
  • Inverse Kinematics
  • Workspace analysis and and specifying appropriate robotic manipulators for industrial processes

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 1 hour

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 25.00 12.5 hours of student time
Exam 75.00 2 hour exam
Scalable Cross-Platform Software Design

Development and deployment of software for a variety of platforms ranging from the web and mobile devices through to large scale parallel computers.

Sensing Systems and Signal Processing (spring)

This module covers a selection of topics where information is acquired from sensors and subsequently electronically processed. Applications will typically include, optical, acoustic, non-destructive evaluation, medical and biophotonics.

Method and Frequency of Class:

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 9 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Practicum 2 weeks 1 week 3 hours


Method of Assessment:

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 50.00 Comprised of 3 pieces 
Exam 50.00  
The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules may change or be updated over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for the latest information on available modules.

Core

Industrial/Research Orientated Project

You’ll work on an individual project of direct industrial or research relevance which will be undertaken in collaboration with a suitable company, or research group within the University. The normal expectation is that the project specification will be drawn up following consultation between you, your project supervisor and an advisor at the collaborating company. You’ll work under the supervision of a member of staff with weekly individual tutorials and where appropriate will maintain contact with the collaborating company through meetings and visits.

Optional

Advanced AC Drives (spring)

This module covers the control of AC drives, covering drives for a variety of machine types and control strategies, for example, vector control.

This module:

  • provides a good understanding of the concepts of field orientation and vector control for induction and non-salient and salient PM AC machines.
  • provides information and guidance on the design of control structures and their implementations including parameter dependencies and field weakening
  • imparts design skills through the design of a vector controlled drive using manufacturer’s machine and converter data and defined design specifications
  • develops critical assessment skills through design evaluation

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 2 weeks 2 hours

 

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 50.00 2-hour written examination
Exam 50.00

Part 1: weight 20%, 20 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate fundamental acquisition of the module's learning outcomes.

Part 2: weight 30%, 30 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate application of the module's learning outcomes to realistic engineering design and implement tasks.

Advanced Control (autumn)

This module covers a range of advanced control techniques used in a wide range of engineering applications. Typical topics include multivariable state space modelling, linear and nonlinear systems, continuous and discrete domains and observer theory.

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 7 weeks 2 weeks 2 hours
Practicum 10 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 50.00

Part 1: weight 25%, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate fundamental acquisition of the module's learning outcomes.

Part 2: weight 25%, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate application of the module's learning outcomes to realistic engineering design and implement tasks.

Exam 50.00 Formative health & safety risk assessment
Advanced Electrical Machines (spring)

This module introduces advanced electrical machine concepts and applications in the area of more electric transport, renewable generation and industrial automation.

The module will help you to:

  • develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction of the electromagnetic, mechanical and thermal engineering disciplines related to electrical machine design.
  • develop analytical skills in modelling and design of electrical machines.
  • have a clear understanding of the different types and topologies of modern electrical machines.
  • develop skills in designing electrical machines
  • develop the ability to analyse and characterise an electric motor through its parameters and performance using FEA approach

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 2 weeks 2 hours
Practicum  10 weeks 1 week 2 hours

 

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 25.00

Part 1: weight 12.5%, 12.5 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate fundamental acquisition of the module's learning outcomes.

Part 2: weight 25%, 12.5 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate application of the module's leaning outcomes to realistic engineering design and implement tasks.

Exam 75.00  
Advanced Power Electronics

This module covers a range of advanced power electronic techniques and implementations for a variety of applications, including the design of power electronic converters for real applications. Both component-level design and the impact of non-idealities on modelling and operation are considered.

Method and Frequency of Class:

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 2 weeks 2 hours


Method of Assessment:

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 50.00

Part 1: weight 25%, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate fundamental acquisition of the module's learning outcomes.

Part 2: weight 25%, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate application of the module's learning outcomes to realistic engineering design and implement tasks.

Exam 50.00  
Applied Computational Engineering
Artificial Intelligence and Intelligent Systems (spring)

This module includes selected topics from the field of artificial intelligence with particular focus on the interface with electronic systems. It aims to provide knowledge of the fundamentals of artificial intelligence technologies, and their relevance to Electronic Engineering applications.

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Laboratory 10 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Lecture 12 weeks 2 weeks 2 hours

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 1 50.00

Part 1: weight 25%, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate fundamental acquisition of the module's learning outcomes

Part 2: weight 25%, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate application of the module's learning outcomes to realistic engineering design and implement tasks.

Exam 50.00  
Digital Signal Processing (autumn)

This module introduces the principles, major algorithms and implementation possibilities of digital signal processing at an advanced level.

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 2 weeks 2 hours
Workshop 10 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 50.00

Part 1: weight 25%, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate fundamental acquisition of the module's learning outcomes.

Part 2: weight 25%, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate application of the module's learning outcomes to realistic engineering design and implement tasks.

Exam 50.00  
Distributed Generation and Alternative Energy (spring)

This module covers the operation of modern power systems, including deregulated power systems, distributed generation, microgrids, the energy storage as well as technologies for producing clean energy and efficient HVDC power transmission.

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 2 weeks 2 hours
Practicum  10 weeks 1 week 2 hours

 

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 1 50.00

Part 1: weight 25%, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate fundamental acquisition of the module's learning outcomes.

Part 2: weight 25%, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate application of the module's learning outcomes to realistic engineering design and implement tasks.

Exam 1 50.00  
HDL for Programmable Devices (spring)

The module introduces both the syntax and application of HDL for the design of modern electronics. That would typically cover Xilinx, Mentor Graphics, and combinational and sequential circuits design. 

To introduce students to the VHDL syntax and its latest development. The module will use the software tools from both Xilinx and Mentor Graphics to present FPGA based digital system design flow with VHDL.

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 7 weeks 2 weeks 3 hours
Practicum 4 weeks 1 week 3 hours

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 50.00

Part 1: weight 10%, 10 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate fundamental acquisition of the module's learning outcomes.

Part 2: Weight 40%, 40 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate application of the module's learning outcomes to realistic engineering design and implement tasks.

Exam 50.00  
Instrumentation and Measurement (autumn)

This module is an introduction to the principles and practice of instrumentation and measurement systems in an engineering context. The module will cover the generally applicable basic principles and then look at specific classes of instrument and associated electronics and signal processing methods. Topics covered include:

  • Basic principles and instrument characteristics.
  • Measurement errors, basic statistics, noise and its control.
  • Dynamic characteristics of instruments, time and frequency domain responses.
  • System identification using correlation techniques.
  • Amplifiers, filters, ADCs and DACs.
  • Position, strain, pressure and motion sensors (resistive, capacitive, inductive, optical).
  • Flow sensors.    
  • Electronic and optical measurement instrumentation.

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 2 weeks 2 hours

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 50.00

Coursework Part 1: weight 0.5, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate fundamental acquisition of the module's learning outcomes.

Coursework Part 2: weight 0.5, 25 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate application of the module's learning outcomes to realistic engineering design and implement tasks.

Exam 50.00 2 hour exam.
Power Systems for Aerospace, Marine and Automotive Applications (spring)

This module aims to develop an understanding of the design and operation of power systems in aerospace, marine and automotive applications. With the introduction of more electrical technologies in these application areas, the understanding and expected performance of the power system has become a critical platform design issue.

Method and Frequency of Class:

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 11 weeks 2 weeks 2 hours
Practicum  10 weeks 1 week 2 hours


Method of Assessment:

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 25.00

Part 1: weight 12.5%, 12.5 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate fundamental acquisition of the module's learning outcomes.

Part 2: weight 12.5%, 12.5 hours of student effort; assessment of student ability to demonstrate application of the module's learning outcomes to realistic engineering design and implement tasks.

Exam 75.00  
RF Electronics (spring)

This module covers the main concepts in design of high-speed circuits and devices. These typically include passive circuits, amplifiers and active devices.

Delivery

Activity Number of Weeks Number of sessions Duration of a session
Lecture 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours
Practicum 12 weeks 1 week 2 hours

Assessment method

Assessment Type Weight Requirements
Coursework 50.00

Part 1: 20 hours of student effort. Part 2: 30 hours of student effort.

Exam 50.00  
The above is a sample of the typical modules we offer but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Modules may change or be updated over the duration of the course due to a number of reasons such as curriculum developments or staffing changes. Please refer to the module catalogue for the latest information on available modules.

Fees and funding

UK students

£9,250
Per year

International students

To be confirmed in 2020*
Keep checking back for more information
*For full details including fees for part-time students and reduced fees during your time studying abroad or on placement (where applicable), see our fees page.

If you are a student from the EU, EEA or Switzerland starting your course in the 2021/22 academic year, you will pay international tuition fees.

This does not apply to Irish students, who will be charged tuition fees at the same rate as UK students. UK nationals living in the EU, EEA and Switzerland will also continue to be eligible for ‘home’ fee status at UK universities until 31 December 2027.

For further guidance, check our Brexit information for future students.

Scholarships and bursaries

The University offers a wide range of bursaries and scholarships. These funds can provide you with an additional source of non-repayable financial help:

Home students*

Over one third of our UK students receive our means-tested core bursary, worth up to £1,000 a year. Full details can be found on our financial support pages.

* A 'home' student is one who meets certain UK residence criteria. These are the same criteria as apply to eligibility for home funding from Student Finance.

International/EU students

We offer a range of Undergraduate Excellence Awards for high-achieving international and EU scholars from countries around the world, who can put their Nottingham degree to great use in their careers. This includes our European Union Undergraduate Excellence Award for EU students and our UK International Undergraduate Excellence Award for international students based in the UK.

These scholarships cover a contribution towards tuition fees in the first year of your course. Candidates must apply for an undergraduate degree course and receive an offer before applying for scholarships. Check the links above for full scholarship details, application deadlines and how to apply.

Careers

With the broad range of skills acquired from this degree, you will have excellent career prospects in areas such as; software development, fibre optic and mobile communications, aerospace technology, automotive systems and renewable energy technologies.

Average starting salary and career progression

86.7% of undergraduates from the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering secured graduate level employment or further study within 15 months of graduation. The average annual salary for these graduates was £30,810.*

* HESA Graduate Outcomes 2020. The Graduate Outcomes % is derived using The Guardian University Guide methodology. The average annual salary is based on graduates working full-time within the UK.

Studying for a degree at the University of Nottingham will provide you with the type of skills and experiences that will prove invaluable in any career, whichever direction you decide to take.

Throughout your time with us, our Careers and Employability Service can work with you to improve your employability skills even further; assisting with job or course applications, searching for appropriate work experience placements and hosting events to bring you closer to a wide range of prospective employers.

Have a look at our careers page for an overview of all the employability support and opportunities that we provide to current students.

The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain’s leading graduate employers (Ranked in the top ten in The Graduate Market in 2013-2020, High Fliers Research).

Institute of Engineering and Technology

This course is accredited by the Institute of Engineering and Technology.

This degree has been accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council. Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC).

An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng).

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Related courses

The University has been awarded Gold for outstanding teaching and learning

Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) 2017-18

Disclaimer

This online prospectus has been drafted in advance of the academic year to which it applies. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate at the time of publishing, but changes (for example to course content) are likely to occur given the interval between publishing and commencement of the course. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply for the course where there has been an interval between you reading this website and applying.