Triangle

Catch-up

You can catch up on our live lectures and subject talks to experience what it’s like studying at University. 

To learn something new – select ‘Live lectures’ and filter by theme to find a lecture that sparks your interest.  

If you’d like to meet a tutor and find your ideal course – select ‘Subject talks’ and look through our range of subject areas.

This is not an open day - find out about our live lectures and subject talks

Supercritical fluids for green chemistry

Sustainable technologies

Supercritical fluids (SCFs) are gases, such as CO2 or steam, which are compressed until they are nearly as dense as liquids. They display a fascinating combination of the properties of gases and liquids. Like a gas they have to be contained in a closed vessel and can mix with other gases such as hydrogen or oxygen, and like liquids they can dissolve solids. First described in 1869, it is much more recently that Nottingham has pioneered the use of these fluids as solvents for carrying out chemistry in a greener, more environmentally acceptable way.

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Game of kings and queens

Our place in the world

"This royal throne of kings, this sceptered isle … this England". When we look at history, we tend to see it as a game of thrones between kings and queens. We may also focus on people and places, relying on Shakespeare or mythology to interpret the past. This can act as a catharsis, especially in troubled times — we need to believe in dragons, knights and damsels in distress. Of course, history is neither ‘better’ nor ‘worse’ than today. It can however help us understand how we got here, why we got here, and perhaps what we can do next.

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How using multiple sciences can help to solve the world's biggest problems

Digital futures

Solving global challenges, such as finding a cure for cancer or slowing climate change, need a joint effort to explore all the different options and approaches. Are you passionate about science and interested to find out more about how biology, chemistry, environmental science, geography, maths, physics and psychology are interconnected? We will explore how the boundaries between the different subjects are often artificial and blurred. By asking for your suggestions, I will demonstrate how by working together, the different sciences can contribute towards finding solutions to these global problems.

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Roman satire does social distancing - Martial and disgusting kisses

Our place in the world

Get a flavour of Roman life, including attitudes to status, bodies, and health. We'll examine the Roman poet Martial, who complains that Linus spends winter trying to 'kiss the whole of Rome' (Epigram 7.95). He forces his 'dog-like nostrils' and his 'icicles of mucus' on everyone. Not even people who give oral sex, or recently castrated Phrygian priests, are as terrifying, he jokes. Martial combines physical disgust with prejudices about morality, identity and social class. We'll explore how Roman culture is both familiar yet disturbingly different, as shown in the satires of late first century Rome.

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Polluting-home to eco-home

Building our world

How would you design a zero carbon eco-home? The talk explores where energy is used in our homes and how this contributes to global warming. More importantly you will be introduced to solutions such as climate responsive architecture, integrated renewable energy systems, passive and active building technologies. You will be encouraged to think about your own home and how it could be adapted from polluting to eco. To achieve our net zero carbon ambitions it is essential all of us live and work in sustainable buildings. The talk is informed by the unique research done by the University of Nottingham.

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Infant nutrition and well-being: let’s start at the very beginning

A new era of health

Did you know that early dietary habits formed as an infant play a significant role in shaping eating habits as teenagers and adults? This live lecture will explore how babies are fed. We will consider how much sugar a baby consumes, and the impact this has on the nation's health. We will also debate whose responsibility it is to instigate change in promoting healthy eating habits.

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Using maths in the fight against COVID-19

Digital futures

Over recent months we have seen many predictions about how COVID-19 will affect us. Some of these theories are based on mathematical modelling, others on speculation. Are you curious about how these modelled predictions can be used? During this lecture you will discover some of the approaches that are being taken to model the pandemic. You’ll learn why our ability to mathematically model epidemics is so critical for today and for future generations.

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Would you eat insects to help feed the world?

Building our world

Insects could provide a different source of protein to meat. But would you consider eating them?

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Technology, behaviour and addiction

A new era of health

What makes behaviour addictive? Can you be addicted to mobile games? Are they a dangerous habit, or a bit of harmless fun? Parents, politicians and the media have raised concerns about new types of online entertainment, but how addictive are they really? 

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The genes behind cancer: oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes

A new era of health

Oncogenes are genes that cause cancer. Tumour suppressor genes are meant to protect us from cancer. These two types of genes are important to understanding cancer and how it works. This lecture will look into the history of these genes, how they were identified, and why they're so important to cancer.

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Why make art? Power

Our place in the world

Explore how Renaissance art was used to gain and maintain power. The Renaissance is an essential period for History of Art students to learn about. It was when the relationship between artists and patrons expanded and diversified. One of the main Renaissance trends was an increase in the production of portraits of men and women in power. These images went beyond physical appearance, expressing ideas about class, gender and race. As such, we'll explore what these portraits can tell us about the social context in which they were made.

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Wastewater treatment and beyond - the road to sustainability and a circular economy

Sustainable technologies

Water is a valuable resource and we all rely on quality water to meet our needs, but what happens to the water we use? Engineering plays a vital role in designing wastewater treatment processes to clean our used water so it becomes fit for reuse. But what technological solutions are being engineered to address global challenges such as emerging pollutants in our used water? How can we embrace the circular economy, which is critical for ensuring sustainable water resources? And what will future wastewater treatment look like - where pollutants become products, and society’s waste may also be its wealth?

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From F1 to road

Sustainable technologies

In this lecture we discuss how F1 technologies are being translated into mass volume cars and other transport.

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How do computers see?

Digital futures

Computer vision is one of the most important areas of artificial intelligence. Recreating what humans find easy to do is a real computational challenge.

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Why sandcastles stay up

Building our world

Using videos, schematics and a chalk and talk approach, the mechanics behind why sandcastles stand up will be introduced. This is a visual introduction to a principle taught to Year 1 Civil Engineering students.

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Ageing vs lifestyle - what decides your fate?

A new era of health

The UK’s population is ageing. Twenty percent of the UK is over 65 years of age, and one third of those born today are expected to live to 100 years of age.

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Proteins from the past - ancient bones and teeth share their biochemical secrets

A new era of health

Your bones can tell a story. Recently, scientists have realised that some proteins are exceptionally stable and survive in mineralised tissues (e.g. bones and teeth) for up to millions of years. We are able to analyse these proteins and create molecular reconstructions of ancient lifestyles, allowing us to see into the past and study the health and diseases of our ancestors.

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How a jet engine works

Sustainable technologies

This lecture will describe the principles behind the jet engine including background and history of its development and physics. Some of the maths used to calculate the thrust and efficiency of jet engines will be described and demonstrated and recent key technical developments will also be highlighted.

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Innovating the built environment with artificial intelligence

Digital futures

Today computers are everywhere and virtually in almost everything we touch, they are in our smart home devices, thermostats, appliances and cameras. The use of computers has accelerated and is transforming our lives at an increasing rate. Artificial intelligence technology is transforming the built environment sector, using techniques such as image recognition and analysis to measure occupancy, optimise facility management, automating surveillance, etc. In this lecture we will explore the emerging applications for this technology, and what are some ways in which it is already bringing benefits to built environment sector.

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Should Buddhists be social activists?

Our place in the world

Many modern Buddhists belong to social activist movements that aim to change the world for the better, like Extinction Rebellion. They usually argue that social activism is part of their commitments to compassion and relieving the suffering of others. But this is very questionable – there is little in the teachings of the Buddha that encourages AMBITIOUS LARGE-SCALE social activism. In fact, the Buddha usually argues against this sort of work. If that’s right, then we need to rethink the moral role of Buddhism in the modern world.

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Books to change the world

Our place in the world

From vampires to comic books, this lecture investigates writing and reading practices that make a tangible difference to our communities and to the wider world. It begins by looking at verbal and visual works from late eighteenth-century through to the present, considering the ways writers and artists use popular culture as a venue for enacting social change. Next we explore the role of ourselves as students and scholars in realising the creative and regenerative potentials of these texts. Finally, we will consider the way in which other popular media (tv, film and comics) contribute to politics and the medical humanities.

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Bacteria, antibiotics and treating infections

A new era of health

Bacterial infections and emerging bacterial resistance to antibiotics both present major healthcare challenges. This affects everyone globally.

How do our healthcare prescribers choose which antibiotic to use? How are agents (antimicrobials) used to control infection? How well can we limit the spread of resistance through hygiene strategies and the careful use of antibiotics?

Join our journey to understand the basics of bacteria, their structure, how they enter the human body and how they cause diseases.

We’ll explore some of the challenges in developing new antibiotics and the impact antimicrobial programmes have on treating infections effectively.

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Zootherapy – 'walking pharmacies'

A new era of health

Animal-based medicine, or 'zootherapy', was commonly practised in the past. Today, it is used in societies where there is a ‘non-Western’ approach to medicine. This suggests that animals have always been important in maintaining human health. Different views of ‘medicine’ are sometimes overlooked in studies of the past. We will use the European fallow deer (Dama dama) as a case study. We'll examine evidence that they were thought to have magico-religious medicinal qualities. They were an exotic species, well-represented in classical mythology and iconography, and had been moved by humans across the world in the past. Was this because they were seen as ‘walking pharmacies’?

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Artificial intelligence, atom by atom

Digital futures

"Can we build a Star Trek replicator? Can we break down matter into its component atoms and molecules? Can we reassemble matter into another form (including a good hot cup of Earl Grey)? Sadly we can’t— not yet, anyway.

However, with today’s technology we can see single atoms. We can watch them be prodded, pushed and pulled into more sophisticated nanostructures.

To do this, we use a microscope like no other. Without lenses or mirrors, the scanning probe microscope (SPM) allows us to move atoms.

Discover how SPMs are being integrated with artificial intelligence techniques to revolutionise our ability to change the atomic and molecular worlds. "

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How to feed the growing global population?

To feed the growing global population, we need to double our crop production by 2050. Climate change makes this target more challenging. We need to develop crops that can take up water and nutrients more efficiently. By identifying the genes that control the shape and branching of roots, we can breed more sustainable crops. This lecture shows how we are using imaging technology to look at plant roots growing in soil. We can then find traits that influence uptake of water and nutrients.

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