Animal Science BSc

   
   
  

Fact file - 2019 entry

Qualification
BSc Hons Animal Science
UCAS code
D320
Duration
3 years full-time (also available part-time)
A level offer
ABB-BBB 
Required subjects
at least two science-based subjects at A level, (biology and chemistry preferred, but can include physics, maths, psychology and geography), and an additional A level or equivalent. Citizenship studies, critical thinking, general studies and leisure studies not accepted. We may consider ABC depending on predicted grades in specific subjects
IB score
32-30 including 5 in two science subjects at Higher Level (must include at least one of biology or chemistry)  
Course location
Sutton Bonington Campus 
Course places
45-55
School/department
 

Overview

Gain a broad scientific understanding of fundamental animal biology and the training to be able to apply this knowledge in areas of interest to you and your career aspirations.
Read full overview
  • Studying animal science at Nottingham will give you the scientific understanding of applied animal biology, and the flexibility to choose modules suited to your areas of interest.
  • Key elements include animal physiology and reproduction, biochemistry and nutrition, developmental biology and bioethics and animal welfare.
  • You will benefit from our extensive industrial and institutional research links with visits to relevant research organisations. We collaborate on work with companies such as the global agri-food businesses AB Agri and Cargill.
  • Gain insights through visits, field trips and guest lectures from our connections with organizations, which have previously included The Stabiliser™ Cattle Company, AHDB, a levy board funded by UK farmers and PDSA, a UK veterinary charity.
 

animal science

Ranked 1st for our animal science courses in The Complete University Guide 2019, Agriculture and Forestry rankings. The degree is based at the Sutton Bonington Campus, known internationally for its applied animal science research in fertility, nutrition, reproduction and product quality.

Interaction of animal science with the pharmaceutical industry is developing and links to human nutrition, biomedical science and physiology are advancing.

This requires well-trained and adaptable scientists who understand fundamental animal biology but who can apply their knowledge and understanding.

University Farm and Dairy Centre

Sutton Bonington Campus is home to the University Farm and Dairy Centre - a 450 hectare mixed farm, with arable crops, 200 robotically milked dairy cows, a sheep flock, environmental stewardship land and new and established woodland.

The farm is commercially run, with facilities for research and teaching, including a Farm Demonstration Centre; farm staff contribute to the teaching on our degree programmes.

We are taking the national lead for dairy research as the Centre of Dairy Science Innovation. This has led to considerable investment and expansion in our dairy centre to deliver world leading research in livestock health and production to deliver improved food security and farming sustainability. 

int agri bus man

 

Student stories

darcie profile
Darcie Stott
BSc Animal Science
"I chose to study animal science, because the modules taught are very diverse. Like many people I don’t yet know what career path I want to follow, which is why this degree is perfect. I like studying at Sutton Bonington, the campus has a great atmosphere, near to the countryside but also very accessible to the rest of the university."
flo j profile
Flo Jenkins
BSc Animal Science
"Studying animal science at the University of Nottingham has been wonderful! The course has a great mixture of practical and theory work that covers a wide range of topics, from micronutrition to physiology of tissues. The staff are also so enthusiastic about their subjects that it rubs off on you too, which creates a great learning environment for everyone. This has been enhanced further by the excellent on campus facilities, such as the robotic dairy farm, that have given me opportunities I would never have had otherwise."
 

Inspiring academics

ramiro profile
Dr Ramiro Alberio
Associate Professor in Developmental Epigenetics
Dr Alberio’s group investigates the cellular mechanisms that determine the formation of different cells such as gut, muscle or nervous system in an animal. He uses animal embryos to study how these decisions are made early in development and models the findings in embryos within vitro tools, such as embryonic stem cells, to dissect what genes are important for directing cell fate. This research teaches us about the general principles of developmental biology, but it also has important applications for regenerative medicine. Understanding how cells form and arrange themselves in an embryo can be used to generate cells in a laboratory that can be used for transplantation or for disease modelling.
 

Yearly overviews

Year one

During year one, you will follow a broad base of modules in the animal  sciences, including subjects like biology, biochemistry, physiology and nutrition. Using practical sessions and lectures, you’ll learn more about animal biology and explore the way in which animal product quality can be manipulated. You’ll get to explore the ultrastructure – the structure of a cell too small to be seen with an ordinary microscope – of animal, plant and bacterial cells and even viruses. 

Year two

In year two, depending on your interests and future career aspirations, you can choose between two different pathways of study:

Physiology and Health examines reproduction, animal health, physiology and pharmcology. 

  • Animal health focuses on companion, farm and exotic animals, you’ll explore the main types of disease and how to assess the health status of an animal.
  • You’ll have a mix of lectures and practical laboratory sessions and gain experience in safe animal handling techniques.  

Production and Nutrition pathway;

  • You will learn applied animal science with visits to local livestock farms which will give you the opportunity to further develop your understanding within a ‘real-life’ context and are a core component of the module.
  • Animal nutrition examines topics such as: dietary energy and nutritional energetics, protein and amino acid nutrition, and regulation of appetite and energy expenditure. 

Year three

In year three you will carry out a major research project in a supervised environment. Our academics in animal science are at the forefront of research on reproduction, development, growth and health of domestic animals including major programmes in genetics, nutrition, reproduction, early development, animal biotechnology, neurophysiology and applied bioethics.

  • You may either work in close collaboration with animals (farm livestock, companion species) and/or laboratory procedures to study animal physiology or biochemistry at a molecular, tissue, organ and/or whole animal level.
  • Projects can be undertaken at other research institutes or zoos; we have links with nearby Twycross Zoo and the Durrell Wildlife Park in Jersey. 
  • Library-based projects that give you the opportunity to carry out an in-depth study of the scientific literature in an area of your interest are also available.
 

Study abroad and industry placements

You have the opportunity of taking a year in industry between years two and three of your degree, extending your degree to a four year programme. 

This optional year in industry, as a paid employee, gives you experience in a real-world environment to develop your skills further, which will significantly improve your employment prospects.

In addition, there are a variety of study abroad opportunities from a semester to a whole year. Depending on your subject you can;

  • apply to spend a semester of your second year at one of our highly ranked international partner universities including Australia, New Zealand, Canada or the USA via the University-wide exchange programme.
  • study abroad for an additional year at one of our highly ranked Erasmus+ partner universities in France, Austria or Spain. If you choose to transfer to this option you would take language modules in the relevant language during year two, and would have the option of studying abroad in your chosen language or in English, subject to availability.
  • take part in a summer school: we have a range of options in subjects such as business, entrepreneurship and languages available.

Find out more

You can decide to apply for a year in industry or apply to study abroad when you start your degree.
 

Additional year in Computer Science

Boost your degree even further by studying computer science for a year between years two and three of your degree, extending your degree to a four year programme.

A year spent in the University's School of Computer Science will give you training in software development and computing skills relevant to your final year research project and benefit you in your future career.

You can decide to transfer into this programme from your BSc course when you start your degree (subject to progression criteria).

 
 

Entry requirements

A levels: ABB-BBB, including at least two science-based subjects at A level, (biology and chemistry preferred but can include physics, maths psychology and geography), and an additional A level or equivalent.

Citizenship studies, critical thinking, general studies and leisure studies not accepted. We may also consider ABC depending on predicted grades in specific subjects.

English language requirements 

IELTS 6.0 (no less than 5.5 in any element)

For details of other English language tests and qualifications we accept, please see our entry requirements page.

 

If you require additional support to take your language skills to the required level, you may be able to attend a presessional course at the Centre for English Language Education, which is accredited by the British Council for the teaching of English in the UK.

Students who successfully complete the presessional course to the required level can progress onto their chosen degree course without retaking IELTS or equivalent.

Alternative qualifications 

For details please see alternative qualifications page

Foundation year - a foundation year is available for this course

Science Foundation Certificate

International students only

International students (non-EU) who do not have the required qualifications or grades to go directly onto an undergraduate degree course, may be interested in the Science Foundation Certificate delivered through The University of Nottingham International College. You are guaranteed a place on selected undergraduate courses if all progression requirements are met. 

Science with Foundation Year

Home, EU and international students

If you have achieved high grades in your A levels (or equivalent qualifications) but do not meet the current subject entry requirements for direct entry to your chosen undergraduate course, you may be interested in our one year science foundation programme. Applicants must also demonstrate good grades in previous relevant science subjects to apply. You are guaranteed a place on selected undergraduate courses if all progression requirements are met.  

Flexible admissions policy

In recognition of our applicants’ varied experience and educational pathways, the University of Nottingham employs a flexible admissions policy. We may make some applicants an offer lower than advertised, depending on their personal and educational circumstances. Please see the University’s admissions policies and procedures for more information.  
 

Modules

The following is a sample of the typical modules that we offer as at the date of publication but is not intended to be construed and/or relied upon as a definitive list of the modules that will be available in any given year. Due to the passage of time between commencement of the course and subsequent years of the course, modules may change due to developments in the curriculum and the module information in this prospectus is provided for indicative purposes only.

Typical year one modules

Core

Animal Biology

Animals – both pets and livestock – play a big part in our lives. In this module, you’ll be introduced to animal ecology and evolution and examine the basis of animal interactions with humans. You’ll then look at domestication and how animal production systems have been developed. Using practical sessions and lectures, you’ll learn more about animal biology and explore the way in which animal product quality can be manipulated.

 

The Biosciences and Global Food Security

How can you use science to help improve global food security? This module introduces you to the issues of global food security and the complexity existing in different parts of our food generation system. Looking across the food supply chain, you’ll cover the evolution of crops, crop and animal production, and the food industry. Importantly, you’ll also look at sustainable nutrition because food security isn’t just about supply – it’s important that people are getting the right kind of food. You’ll learn about these issues through a mix of lectures and practical laboratory sessions. You’ll also develop professional skills to work safely in laboratory situations.
 
Biochemistry - The Building Block of Life
Have you ever wondered how some crops can resist diseases? This module provides you with the fundamentals for understanding biochemical processes in living organisms. You’ll be introduced to the basic structure, properties and functions of the four key biological macromolecules: nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. You’ll also look at the metabolic pathways occurring in cells, such as respiration, photosynthesis and the biosynthetic pathways for the key macromolecules. In addition to lectures, you’ll have practical laboratory sessions to learn how to use key biochemical techniques for the separation and analysis of macromolecules and measurement of the metabolic process.
 
 
Genes and Cells 1
The basic functional units of life are cells. In this module you’ll learn about the growth and development of cells, focusing on mitosis, meiosis, cell division and differentiation. You’ll get to explore the ultrastructure – the structure of a cell too small to be seen with an ordinary microscope – of animal, plant and bacterial cells and even viruses. Once you have this foundation understanding, the second part of the module covers fundamental genetic principles and you’ll be able to answer the questions: What are the Mendelian laws of inheritance? How are genes expressed? You’ll have lectures from current researchers in the field and the opportunity to apply your learning in the laboratory and in workshops.
 
 
Genes and Cells 2
In a series of lectures, workshops and practicals you’ll further develop your understanding of gene structure, function and regulation and investigate how this knowledge can be applied in recombinant DNA technology through DNA sequencing and genetic engineering.  
 
 
Introduction to Nutrition 
Nutrients are vital to humans and animals, but how do they work? In this module you’ll be given a comprehensive introduction to the key concepts in the field of nutrition, including macronutrients, energy metabolism, vitamins and minerals. Depending on your interest, you’ll be able to focus on human or animal nutrition. This means you can choose to look at the role of nutrition in human disease (including coronary heart disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes), or learn about animal nutrition and what it means for food production. You’ll learn about nutrition through a mix of lectures, practical sessions and e-learning.
 
Introductory Physiology
This module introduces the major physiological systems which are essential for animal life: the central nervous system, the respiratory system, the cardiovascular system, the renal system and the digestive system. You’ll learn about the structures and functions of the major organs and the functions of individual cell types. The module will cover animal functions including their reactions to the internal and external environments, reproduction and development. You’ll have weekly lectures and various practical classes.
 
Biosciences Tutorials and Foundation Science

The tutorials component of this module is intended to enhance your transition into university and guide you through the academic expectations of your degrees. This part of the module is spread throughout the year and includes three generic sessions on ‘study skills and plagiarism’, ‘study opportunities’ and ‘career and personal development’, and a series of small group tutorials with your academic tutor to develop generic skills such as finding crucial information, oral presentation, data handling and presentation of results, preparation for examinations, and essay writing skills relevant to biosciences.

The Foundation Science content has three elements: chemistry, maths and statistics and physics. The chemistry element will include: elements and periodic table; atomic structure and bonding; intermolecular attractions, chemical equilibrium; acids and bases, oxidation and reduction; rates of reaction; basic organic chemistry, isomerism, and rings. The maths and statistics element will include: calculations, algebra, functions and relationships, powers, logarithms, descriptive statistics, significance, regression and presenting data. The physics element will include: units and dimensions; power, energy and heat; light and the electromagnetic spectrum; attenuation/absorption; and radioactivity.

There is also an IT element, which interfaces with generic IT training for undergraduates provided within the University.

 
 

Typical year two modules

Core Physiology and Health pathway

Reproductive Physiology
Understanding reproduction is important for many different aspects of animal science. In this module, you’ll become familiar with the physiology and regulation of male and female mammalian reproduction, the control of avian reproduction and lactational physiology. You’ll look at reproduction in male and female mammals, including physiological control, cyclicity and reproductive efficiency. You’ll also consider the principal features of avian physiology and reproduction in domestic fowl, with an emphasis on the nutritional and metabolic challenges associated with commercial rates of egg lay. Lactational physiology will also be discussed, and you’ll learn about the development of mammary tissue, the biochemistry of milk synthesis, the endocrine control of milk secretion, and the metabolic correlates of lactation in dairy ruminants. You’ll have a mix of lectures and practical laboratory sessions for experimental work and dissection.
 
 
Principles of Animal Health and Disease 1
Animal health and diseases can have serious health implications for people and livestock. In this module you’ll learn how diseases affect the body’s physiological and immunological systems. Focusing on companion, farm and exotic animals, you’ll explore the main types of disease and how to assess the health status of an animal. You’ll have a mix of lectures and practical laboratory sessions and gain experience in safe animal handling techniques.
 
 
Physiology of Electrically Excitable Tissues
Building on the physiology of year one, this module considers the physiology and pharmacology of systems involving the principal electrically excitable tissues in the body i.e. the nervous system, musculature and cardiovascular system. You will investigate how the nervous system controls and modulates these tissues (e.g. muscles including cardiac tissue) in an integrated system. You will have lectures and practical classes to learn how to collect, analyse and present real data from the neuromuscular, somatosensory and cardiovascular systems as well as how to perform a quantitative pharmacological investigation.
 
Professional Skills for Bioscientists 
In this module you will develop and consolidate your professional competencies and abilities as a bioscientist. You’ll improve your core professional skills in the scientific method, experimentation, data analysis and measurement techniques that enable you to carry out scientifically-sound research in animal, crop or management science. You’ll also cover discipline-specific topics. There will be a mix of lectures, workshops and group activity sessions for you to work on your skills.
 
Endocrine Control Systems

This module introduces students to the physiology and biochemistry of the mammalian endocrine system and to the endocrine control of homeostasis and metabolism. You will cover a more comprehensive and detailed appreciation of theoretical and applied aspects of endocrinology with lectures and group work. For example you will learn about the structure and biochemistry of hormonally active molecules as a tool for understanding endocrine physiology; how the endocrine system regulates calcium and glucose concentrations in the blood; how the central nervous system interacts with the main endocrine axes, and how these axes regulate major physiological and metabolic systems. 

 


Core - Production and Nutrition pathway

Reproductive Physiology 
Understanding reproduction is important for many different aspects of animal science. In this module, you’ll become familiar with the physiology and regulation of male and female mammalian reproduction, the control of avian reproduction and lactational physiology. You’ll look at reproduction in male and female mammals, including physiological control, cyclicity and reproductive efficiency. You’ll also consider the principal features of avian physiology and reproduction in domestic fowl, with an emphasis on the nutritional and metabolic challenges associated with commercial rates of egg lay. Lactational physiology will also be discussed, and you’ll learn about the development of mammary tissue, the biochemistry of milk synthesis, the endocrine control of milk secretion, and the metabolic correlates of lactation in dairy ruminants. You’ll have a mix of lectures and practical laboratory sessions for experimental work and dissection.
 
Applied Animal Science 

A highly applied module, you’ll learn about animal physiology, nutrition and management and use your knowledge to think critically about production systems. Focusing on the nutrition, growth and welfare of farmed animals, you’ll cover a wide range of subjects, including investigating the energy and protein evaluation systems for ruminants and non-ruminants and the differential maturity of individual carcass components. You’ll compare systems of production for all major species of livestock and explore how these different systems integrate with each other and other enterprises on farms. Visits to local livestock farms will give you the opportunity to further develop your understanding within a ‘real-life’ context and are a core component of the module.

 
Professional Skills for Bioscientists

In this module you will develop and consolidate your professional competencies and abilities as a bioscientist. You’ll improve your core professional skills in the scientific method, experimentation, data analysis and measurement techniques that enable you to carry out scientifically-sound research in animal, crop or management science. You’ll also cover discipline-specific topics. There will be a mix of lectures, workshops and group activity sessions for you to work on your skills. 

 
Endocrine Control Systems

This module introduces students to the physiology and biochemistry of the mammalian endocrine system and to the endocrine control of homeostasis and metabolism. You will cover a more comprehensive and detailed appreciation of theoretical and applied aspects of endocrinology with lectures and group work. For example you will learn about the structure and biochemistry of hormonally active molecules as a tool for understanding endocrine physiology; how the endocrine system regulates calcium and glucose concentrations in the blood; how the central nervous system interacts with the main endocrine axes, and how these axes regulate major physiological and metabolic systems.  

 
Principles of Animal Nutrition 
How important is protein quality in an animal's diet? How can you formulate an optimum diet? In this module you’ll learn about diet formulation and food analysis. You’ll examine topics such as: dietary energy and nutritional energetics, protein and amino acid nutrition, and regulation of appetite and energy expenditure. You’ll be able to calculate the different energy requirements of animals in different physiological or pathological states. There will be a mix of lectures, seminars and computer-based workshops to apply what you’ve learned.
 


Optional modules (both pathways) include:

Animal Behaviour 
This module provides, through lectures, a comprehensive introduction to the study of animal behaviour, from the physiological and genetic bases of behaviour to its development and adaptive significance in the natural environment. Using examples from across the animal kingdom, it emphasizes how predictive modelling, experimental and observational approaches integrate to explain how and why animals behave as they do. 
 
Agricultural and Food Marketing
Marketing is a lot bigger than just advertising. In this module, you’ll learn about the importance of a marketing-orientated approach to successful rural and food businesses. A hands-on module, you’ll use an agricultural or food company of your choice as a case study and, in small teams, analyse its market and create your own marketing plan. Guest lecturers will be invited so you can learn more about how marketing theory is applied in practice and there will be a field visit to a local farm to see their marketing strategy in action. 
 
Physiology of Electrically Excitable Tissues 
Building on the physiology of year one, this module considers the physiology and pharmacology of systems involving the principal electrically excitable tissues in the body i.e. the nervous system, musculature and cardiovascular system. You will investigate how the nervous system controls and modulates these tissues (eg muscles including cardiac tissue) in an integrated system. You will have lectures and practical classes to learn how to collect, analyse and present real data from the neuromuscular, somatosensory and cardiovascular systems as well as how to perform a quantitative pharmacological investigation.
 
Economic Analysis for Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Economic analysis can help you answer important management questions: how much fertiliser should I apply to my wheat? If demand for beer is going up, how will that affect the price I receive for my barley? Through this module you’ll gain an understanding of economic ideas and principles and be able to apply them to a range of problems of interest to agricultural and environmental scientists and managers. You’ll also examine the arguments for government intervention to correct ‘market failures’ with reference to the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and look at CAP support mechanisms and their impact on arable and animal production. In addition to lectures and farm visits, you’ll have computer-aided learning sessions to teach you planning techniques that will enable you to use your economic skills to analyse the impact of the market and policy environment on business performance and stability.

 
Principles of Animal Nutrition
How important is protein quality in an animal's diet? How can you formulate an optimum diet? In this module you’ll learn about diet formulation and food analysis. You’ll examine topics such as: dietary energy and nutritional energetics, protein and amino acid nutrition, and regulation of appetite and energy expenditure. You’ll be able to calculate the different energy requirements of animals in different physiological or pathological states. There will be a mix of lectures, seminars and computer-based workshops to apply what you’ve learned.
 
Principles of Immunology

What are the main events of the immune response when the body is infected by intra and extra-cellular parasites, essential components of many diseases? In this module you’ll be introduced to the fundamental concepts behind cellular and molecular immunology. You’ll learn about the main characteristics and features of the innate and adaptive immune system, their functions and how they relate to each other. You’ll explore current immune-techniques, modern concepts of immune-deficiency and hypersensitivities, and contemporary topics in animal and human diseases.

 
Applied Animal Science

A highly applied module, you’ll learn about animal physiology, nutrition and management and use your knowledge to think critically about production systems. Focusing on the nutrition, growth and welfare of farmed animals, you’ll cover a wide range of subjects, including investigating the energy and protein evaluation systems for ruminants and non-ruminants and the differential maturity of individual carcass components. You’ll compare systems of production for all major species of livestock and explore how these different systems integrate with each other and other enterprises on farms. Visits to local livestock farms will give you the opportunity to further develop your understanding within a ‘real-life’ context and are a core component of the module.

 
 

Typical year three modules

Core - both pathways

Research Project

This module will provide you with an opportunity to use your initiative and knowledge to undertake an original research project under the supervision of an individual member of academic staff. You will be involved in designing the study, gain familiarity with the techniques, undertake data collection, debate ethical issues and where appropriate safety procedures relevant to the topic. You’ll undertake appropriate quantitative analysis and prepare a report of approximately 5000 words.

Our academics are at the forefront of research into reproduction, development, growth and health of domestic animals including major programmes in genetics, nutrition, female reproduction, early development, animal biotechnology, neurophysiology and applied bioethics.

You may either work in close collaboration with animals (farm livestock, companion species) and/or laboratory procedures to study animal physiology or biochemistry at a molecular, tissue, organ, and/or whole animal level.

Some library-based projects that give you the opportunity to carry out an in-depth study of the scientific literature in an area of your
interest are available.

Some projects are undertaken at other research institutes or zoos; we have a formal link with nearby Twycross Zoo. The University Farm and Dairy Centre are on campus.

 


Core - Physiology and Health pathway

Coordinated Physiological Functions

How does the brain control physiology and its associated behaviours? In this module you’ll examine the physiological basis of integrated behaviours. You’ll cover hypothalamic control of the endocrine system, body temperature, emotion, appetite and their associated behaviours. You’ll have lectures and laboratory sessions, including a significant practical component looking at the integrative aspects of exercise physiology.

 
Reproduction and Fertility
Drawing on your knowledge from earlier modules, the Reproduction and Fertility module involves the advanced study of fertility regulation and manipulation in mammals. You’ll learn about the artificial control of reproductive cycles in the female and mechanisms involved in pregnancy recognition and maintenance. You’ll explore recent developments in reproductive technology and embryology as it applies to farm species, humans and endangered species. You’ll have lectures and laboratory practical sessions to apply your learning.
 
Systems Neurophysiology
How does the central nervous system sense the environment and react to it? In this module, you’ll learn about central nervous control of sensory and motor pathways and how these systems interact. In particular, you’ll examine the anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of sensory and motor systems and their integration in posture, coordinated movement and protective reflex responses. A strong emphasis will be on the physiology and pharmacology of acute and chronic pain and you’ll study the use of analgesics to treat these conditions. You’ll also gain an understanding of the methodology behind a number of neuroscientific techniques and their application in novel research. You’ll have a mix of lectures, computer-based learning and practical laboratory sessions to reinforce and apply your knowledge. 
 


Core - Production and Nutrition pathway

Livestock Production Science

How can production systems be adapted to meet demands for animal products in contrasting global markets? In this module, you’ll use your knowledge of physiology, nutrition, genetics, health, welfare and management to study the production of meat, milk and eggs, and the wellbeing of the animals in these production systems. You’ll undertake a detailed study of the integration of the production, nutrition, product quality, management and health of beef and dairy cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry at UK and global scales. You’ll critically analyse key performance indicators and provide solutions to problems encountered in livestock production enterprises. You’ll have a mix of lectures, group work and farm visits to develop and apply your knowledge. 
 
Animal Nutrition

This module will further develop your specialised knowledge of animal nutrition. At an advanced level, you’ll learn about the role of micronutrients and trace minerals in the nutritional requirements for animal health and growth in both ruminant and non-ruminant species. You’ll also examine the various factors involved in the regulation of animal growth and product quality and look at selected examples of metabolic disorders. Using the most up-to-date scientific research, you’ll explore specialist aspects of ruminant nutrition and produce scientific work of your own. 

 


Optional - both pathways

Applied Bioethics 1: Animals, Biotechnology and Society

Animal-human interactions raise some prominent ethical issues. In this module, you’ll examine the ethical dimensions concerning animal agriculture, modern biotechnologies and research in the biosciences, in relation to both humans and non-human species. You’ll learn about the ethical frameworks used to analyse specific dilemmas raised by the human use of animals. Using specific animal and biotechnology case studies, you’ll interpret the main ethical theories and principles and apply them these case studies to inform professional decision-making. You’ll have a mix of lectures and seminars to explore these concepts.
 
 
Companion Animal Science
Want to know more about the nutrition your dog or horse needs, or maybe what an elephant needs? In this module, you’ll study the scientific principles governing the nutrition, health and welfare of major companion species, including dogs, cats, horses, rabbits and zoo animals/exotic species. You’ll learn about the cross-disciplinary principles and the interactions between nutrition, health and longevity within the broad area of ‘clinical nutrition’. Bringing in current research, you’ll look at the problems arising from keeping animals in captivity, and in particular the policies governing zoo animals/exotics in terms of intervention strategies. You’ll have lectures from current researchers and have a field trip to see what you’ve learnt in practice.
 
Molecular Nutrition
This module will examine the concept of metabolic control at the gene, cell and tissue level with particular reference to the role of nutrients in regulating this process. Selected processes by which nutrients and hormones act via receptors and their signal transduction pathways to regulate tissue growth and metabolism will be described along with the mechanisms by which nutrients can act directly on the processes controlling gene expression. You’ll have a mix of lectures and practical sessions for this module.
 
 
Applied Bioethics 2: Sustainable Food Production, Biotechnology and the Environment
Building on Applied Bioethics 1, you’ll investigate widely accepted ethical principles and apply your insights to contemporary ethical issues in agricultural, food and environmental sciences. You’ll explore the ethical dimensions of prominent issues raised by the agricultural practices (including the use of biotechnology and GM crops) designed to meet the nutritional needs of the global population. You’ll also learn about how ethical theory can inform professional choices and public policies related to food production and environmental management. You’ll have a mix of lectures, tutorials and team-based exercises to develop a sound understanding of ethical principles.
 
Animal Nutrition 
This module will further develop your specialised knowledge of animal nutrition. At an advanced level, you’ll learn about the role of micronutrients and trace minerals in the nutritional requirements for animal health and growth in both ruminant and non-ruminant species. You’ll also examine the various factors involved in the regulation of animal growth and product quality and look at selected examples of metabolic disorders. Using the most up-to-date scientific research, you’ll explore specialist aspects of ruminant nutrition and produce scientific work of your own.
 
Epigenetics and Development

This module introduces current concepts of molecular mechanisms in animal development. A goal is to convey how developmental programs are remarkably conserved among species, including humans. You’ll have lectures and a practical session to aide your learning during this module.

 

Rural Business Management

How do you apply management principles to modern rural businesses? This module will develop your knowledge of business management principles and provide you with an opportunity to apply these principles to the type of problems facing rural businesses at the present time. You’ll construct and interpret business accounts, use investment appraisal techniques, learn about labour and machinery management, explore the different forms of business organisation, and consider taxation. Using a ‘real-life’ case study, you’ll also learn and practice teamwork, time management and data analysis skills, which are vital when working in business. You’ll have a mix of lectures and practical classes, as well as guest lectures from invited speakers to give you insights into the management and finance of rural businesses.
 
Biotechnology in Animal Physiology

Through lectures you will be given an understanding of the structure of the biotechnology industry, of the techniques involved, and of the opportunities offered by biotechnology. You’ll learn about the genetic and epigenetic basis of gene expression, and how this knowledge is used to develop treatments for disease.

 
Coordinated Physiological Functions
How does the brain control physiology and its associated behaviours? In this module you’ll examine the physiological basis of integrated behaviours. You’ll cover hypothalamic control of the endocrine system, body temperature, emotion, appetite and their associated behaviours. You’ll have lectures and laboratory sessions, including a significant practical component looking at the integrative aspects of exercise physiology.
 
Management Consultancy
Consultancy is a strong growth area for jobs, particularly in the agricultural industry. In this module you’ll be introduced to the practicalities of management consultancy and have the opportunity to integrate your knowledge of management principles to a real-life case study of your choice based on the University Farm. You’ll learn how to appraise individual enterprises and whole firms with a view to improving the respective financial and technical performance of the business. With a strong focus on working productively as an individual, you’ll assess problems and opportunities, analyse information and data, and identify and meet objectives in order to aid managerial decision-making. To find out more about how consultancy works in practice, you’ll have guest lectures from invited speakers from industry in addition to your lectures and workshops. 
 
Reproduction and Fertility
Drawing on your knowledge from earlier modules, the Reproduction and Fertility module involves the advanced study of fertility regulation and manipulation in mammals. You’ll learn about the artificial control of reproductive cycles in the female and mechanisms involved in pregnancy recognition and maintenance. You’ll explore recent developments in reproductive technology and embryology as it applies to farm species, humans and endangered species. You’ll have lectures and laboratory practical sessions to apply your learning.
 
Systems Neurophysiology
How does the central nervous system sense the environment and react to it? In this module, you’ll learn about central nervous control of sensory and motor pathways and how these systems interact. In particular, you’ll examine the anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of sensory and motor systems and their integration in posture, coordinated movement and protective reflex responses. A strong emphasis will be on the physiology and pharmacology of acute and chronic pain and you’ll study the use of analgesics to treat these conditions. You’ll also gain an understanding of the methodology behind a number of neuroscientific techniques and their application in novel research. You’ll have a mix of lectures, computer-based learning and practical laboratory sessions to reinforce and apply your knowledge. 
 
Principles of Animal Health and Disease 2
The module will develop concepts introduced in year two with a series of lectures, leading to an advanced understanding of how to assess the health of animals. The effects of disease in domesticated animals will be covered including their physiological and immunological responses to disease, and the economic, welfare and legal impacts of disease. Examples from companion, farm and rodent species will be used.
 
 
 
 

Industry placement year 

The optional year in industry takes place between years two and three of your degree, extending your degree to a four year programme. Students apply for a placement during year two of the degree programme.

A year in industry can help you:

  • Gain the opportunity to put your learning into practice, giving you a better understanding of your studies and the chance to solidify your knowledge in an industry setting. 
  • Stand out from the crowd as a graduate: many students secure a graduate job as a direct result of their placement year.
  • Learn about what you enjoy doing, and your strengths and weaknesses, putting you in a strong position when considering your future career.

The school has excellent links with a wide range of businesses and research institutes, examples of relevant companies include The Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition, the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, McDonald’s, Chester Zoo, the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust, Port Lympne Reserve, and AB Agri.

The dedicated School Placement Team work with you to help you search for, apply and secure a placement, as well as supporting you prior to, during and after the placement.

Student placement stories

 

Careers

Our animal science degree is highly regarded by a wide range of employers. The unique blend of fundamental science, practical application (including human nutrition and physiology) and insight into social perspectives has enabled graduates to follow a wide variety of careers.

Recent destinations of graduates include:

  • para-medical/para-veterinary sciences
  • the pharmaceutical industry
  • technical nutrition involved with research and development for the animal feed industry or within government advisory institutes
  • academic and industrial research programmes in basic and applied physiology, nutritional biochemistry and animal production both in
    the UK and overseas, often leading to higher degrees
  • business consultancy in management, sales and marketing in the feed and human food industries 

Average starting salary and career progression

In 2017, 95% of undergraduates in the school who were available for employment had secured work or further study within six months of graduation. The average starting salary was £22,000 with the highest being £30,000.*

*Known destinations of full-time home undergraduates 2016/17. Salaries are calculated based on the median of those in full-time paid employment within the UK.

The University of Nottingham is consistently named as one of the most targeted universities by Britain’s leading graduate employers
(Ranked in the top ten in The Graduate Market in 2013-2017, High Fliers Research).

Careers support and advice

Studying for a degree at the University of Nottingham will provide you with the type of skills and experiences that will prove invaluable in any career, whichever direction you decide to take.

Throughout your time with us, our Careers and Employability Service can work with you to improve your employability skills even further; assisting with job or course applications, searching for appropriate work experience placements and hosting events to bring you closer to a wide range of prospective employers.

Explore career options 

 
 

Fees and funding

Scholarships and bursaries

The University of Nottingham offers a wide range of bursaries and scholarships. These funds can provide you with an additional source of non-repayable financial help. For up to date information regarding tuition fees, visit our fees and finance pages.

Home students*

Over one third of our UK students receive our means-tested core bursary, worth up to £2,000 a year. Full details can be found on our financial support pages.

* A 'home' student is one who meets certain UK residence criteria. These are the same criteria as apply to eligibility for home funding from Student Finance.

International/EU students

Our International Baccalaureate Diploma Excellence Scholarship is available for select students paying overseas fees who achieve 38 points or above in the International Baccalaureate Diploma. We also offer a range of High Achiever Prizes for students from selected countries, schools and colleges to help with the cost of tuition fees. Find out more about scholarships, fees and finance for international students.

 
 
 

Key Information Sets (KIS)


KIS is an initiative that the government has introduced to allow you to compare different courses and universities.


Assessment

This course includes one or more pieces of formative assessment.

How to use the data

Disclaimer
This online prospectus has been drafted in advance of the academic year to which it applies. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information is accurate at the time of publishing, but changes (for example to course content) are likely to occur given the interval between publishing and commencement of the course. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply for the course where there has been an interval between you reading this website and applying.

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